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    I've currently got a really good grasp of HTML/XHTML and can code both of them in accordance to the W3C strict doctype specification and I also have comprehensive knowledge of CSS and code write a valid stylesheet. I also have good awareness of web usability and accessibility.

    The question I have now is where do I move onto from here?
    I have been advised to learn a C syntax language such as JavaScript or PHP. I know JavaScript basics but I just tend to think for all the solutions I need in JavaScript, the code is already done online in libraries but not for PHP.

    I know a little of PHP but want to do more of it. I have been recommended to read this book. Can anyone recommend any other reads to introduce me to PHP and MySQL or can second the opinion about the book being a good guide?

    Opinions and advice are greatly appreciated.

    Cheers
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    I would advise you to look into PHP, out of server-side scripting languages it's probably the easiest one and you can do anything in it... And which site/book? Any, put into google "php tutorials" and you will get plenty of sites...
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    I would also recommend this.
    It's a fairly quick introduction to PHP & MySQL - very easy to follow and very well written.
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    PHP is a mess, although a useful mess. Python and Ruby are now mature enough to use for server-side web programming. Try Rails, Django, merb and a few other frameworks to see if you like them.
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    (Original post by DeadLine)
    And which site/book? Any, put into google "php tutorials" and you will get plenty of sites...
    I usually learn through online tutorials, but this time I want to learn systematically through a book as PHP is a huge topic and I want quality-controlled consistency from the same author instead of mixing and matching different tutorials by different contributors who write in different styles.

    If it doesn't trouble you, could you recommend any books in particular?
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    I recommend learning PHP, it's quite easy to get to grips with the basics and has a huge online support base for when you're stuck with anything. They way I started to learn it was basically to just jump straight in. I started by downloading a couple of sample scripts and working out how they worked, and then just set myself a goal (for example make a simple login script) and went through trying to make it, looking on php.net for any functions I needed help with.
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    (Original post by Rob801)
    I recommend learning PHP, it's quite easy to get to grips with the basics and has a huge online support base for when you're stuck with anything. They way I started to learn it was basically to just jump straight in. I started by downloading a couple of sample scripts and working out how they worked, and then just set myself a goal (for example make a simple login script) and went through trying to make it, looking on php.net for any functions I needed help with.
    yes I agree. I've got some of the very (emphasis on very) basics of PHP from PHP.net as the mannual. It is brilliant in helping with the syntax and showing examples and well as explaining and defining the tags as well. But I'm looking for a nice solid guide as well to help explain things and walk me through PHP as I want to secure myself a good foundation.
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    If you're going to learn PHP, I'd recommend downloading the Documentation from: http://www.php.net/download-docs.php. It's a really helpful reference to have on your computer.
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    (Original post by purplefrog)
    I usually learn through online tutorials, but this time I want to learn systematically through a book as PHP is a huge topic and I want quality-controlled consistency from the same author instead of mixing and matching different tutorials by different contributors who write in different styles.

    If it doesn't trouble you, could you recommend any books in particular?
    Well, I could give you a reference to the book which I was learning from, but it is in Czech language (and by Czech author), so probably not very helpful for you...
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    (Original post by DeadLine)
    Well, I could give you a reference to the book which I was learning from, but it is in Czech language (and by Czech author), so probably not very helpful for you...

    ^^; ah ok, never mind then :p:

    The only czech i know is "dorby den" which means "hello", I think. Forgive me if the spelling/pronunciation is wrong.
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    To be honest I don't think it really matters which web language you learn first. You can pick one and learn how to use it and then dabble in others to see which one suits you and your needs. I do most web programming in Java (J2EE) which may not be the easiest for a beginner to pick up, but any of the languages mentioned in this thread would be fine.
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    (Original post by Baron)
    To be honest I don't think it really matters which web language you learn first. You can pick one and learn how to use it and then dabble in others to see which one suits you and your needs. I do most web programming in Java (J2EE) which may not be the easiest for a beginner to pick up, but any of the languages mentioned in this thread would be fine.
    Probably better in the long term too.

    I tend to find that after learning java, web languages normally become easier to grasp.
    CSS for example I picked up in 30 minutes.
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    Well, CSS isn't language at all... I wouldn't recomend java as first language, since it's quite complicated to grasp object-oriented model and all that stuff, most people (me including ) tend to to use PHP as Pascal = simply and very easy. As long as you don't want to do really good career with web programming you don't need it. Btw. it is "dobry den" .
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    (Original post by DeadLine)
    Well, CSS isn't language at all... I wouldn't recomend java as first language, since it's quite complicated to grasp object-oriented model and all that stuff, most people (me including ) tend to to use PHP as Pascal = simply and very easy. As long as you don't want to do really good career with web programming you don't need it. Btw. it is "dobry den" .
    True.
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    (Original post by DeadLine)
    Well, CSS isn't language at all... I wouldn't recomend java as first language, since it's quite complicated to grasp object-oriented model and all that stuff, most people (me including ) tend to to use PHP as Pascal = simply and very easy. As long as you don't want to do really good career with web programming you don't need it. Btw. it is "dobry den" .
    Agreed on the CSS part its a "sheet" of defining rules. My bad for saying its a language.

    So if I was to aim for a promising career in web programming (my design skills are pathetic anyway), it is recommended I learn PHP?
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    (Original post by purplefrog)
    So if I was to aim for a promising career in web programming (my design skills are pathetic anyway), it is recommended I learn PHP?
    Learn to code well generally. HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Learn about databases, data structures and data generally. Use whatever back-end languages you are comfortable with. But do remember that languages come with baggage. If you learn PHP, you can often fall into the trap of learning some of it's bad practices. If you use languages and frameworks which don't allow you to make those kinds of mistakes, then you won't make them.

    And there's a good trade in Ruby on Rails and Django expertise these days. Think about it.
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    (Original post by tommorris)
    If you learn PHP, you can often fall into the trap of learning some of it's bad practices.
    I've heard that a few times now, but what kind of bad practices exactly does it teach?
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    PHP, Java, XML.
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    (Original post by Wineblood)
    I've heard that a few times now, but what kind of bad practices exactly does it teach?
    Mostly stuff to do with not separating out behaviour and presentation - for instance, putting all your database access code 'at the top of pages'. There are also some security things which many new developers don't know about. And because PHP doesn't encourage testing and type checking (etc.), it's very easy to write insecure code or code which is very unpredictable.

    It's improved a lot with PHP 5, but still, it's not a language I like coding in if I can avoid it.
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    http://www.amazon.co.uk/PHP-MySQL-Dy...2824896&sr=8-3

    To get yourself out of your total n00b-state.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Practical-We...846355&sr=1-14

    And any of the Apress books to develop your understanding further.

    Python and Ruby have much potential for the future but PHP is still the best language to learn for web scripting.
 
 
 
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