GCSE AQA Physics Exam- 11th of June- Super Hard Questions.

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Princeoftermina
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Okay, let's face it- we're going to get into that exam and we're going to come across that one (or likely a few) question(s) that seem(s) impossible to complete. To avoid this, maybe it's a good idea to post questions that you deem quite hard to answer, and we all have a go at answering them.

These questions can be from sheets that you've been given or even from the january paper (the paper that some of us still don't have). It would be even better if people could think up some of these questions (remember, they may be calculations or theory based).

I'll start us off:

What precautions can be taken to avoid damaging computers with static electricity?

Highlight the following for answers (please tell me how to use spoiler boxes!): Grounding the computer system and ensuring that all tools are rubber tipped (straight from the teachers mouth, they are).
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Aaron_1507
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A 4 kilogram block of ice is removed from a freezer where its
temperature was maintained at – 20 degrees Celsius. How much heat
does the ice absorb as it is warmed to – 10 degrees? (The specific
heat capacity of ice is 2,000 joules per kilogram degree Celsius.)
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QED
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80,000 joules, isn't it?
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Princeoftermina
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(Original post by Aaron_1507)
A 4 kilogram block of ice is removed from a freezer where its
temperature was maintained at – 20 degrees Celsius. How much heat
does the ice absorb as it is warmed to – 10 degrees? (The specific
heat capacity of ice is 2,000 joules per kilogram degree Celsius.)
I didn't know this initially, I'll have you know.

I looked at QED's answer (whether that was right or wrong) and tried this working:

Per kilogram degree celcius would mean that you multiply the amount of kilo's by the 2000J, giving you 8000J. We know that the temperature increased by 10 degrees celcius, so we multiply that answer by 10, and voila!

Please correct me if my working is wrong.
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Mr Nonsense
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do we need to know this for physics??
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Princeoftermina
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(Original post by hughey)
do we need to know this for physics??
The above question? I'm not too sure- but all the information was given in that question (AQA absolutely love to ask questions like that). In fact, I wouldn't be surprised to see a question like that with no equation, just the facts.
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Raminder1992
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(Original post by Princeoftermina)
The above question? I'm not too sure- but all the information was given in that question (AQA absolutely love to ask questions like that). In fact, I wouldn't be surprised to see a question like that with no equation, just the facts.
they give you the formulas! its ridiculous i know!! But its what they know do!
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Aaron_1507
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(Original post by Princeoftermina)
I didn't know this initially, I'll have you know.

I looked at QED's answer (whether that was right or wrong) and tried this working:

Per kilogram degree celcius would mean that you multiply the amount of kilo's by the 2000J, giving you 8000J. We know that the temperature increased by 10 degrees celcius, so we multiply that answer by 10, and voila!

Please correct me if my working is wrong.
Haha if you got it well down i just searched on google 'hard physics quesitons' Sorry :cool:
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Aaron_1507
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(Original post by QED)
80,000 joules, isn't it?
yeah i just looked at it, it isnt hard at all. Stupid search engine
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Robbie10538
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Good idea!

Trolley A of 200 grams moving at 1.5m/s to the right collides with a stationary Trolley B. Trolley B weighs 100 grams more than Trolley A. After the collision they move off together. Calulate the velocity that they move off. Include units in your answer. You may use the equation mass = momentum/velocity.

hint
I added lots of annoying stuff into this question . Keep in mind its AQA though- anythings possible

If I re-write the question properly:

Trolley A = 0.2KG
Trolley B = 0.3KG

Trolley A moves 1.5m/s to the right. Collides with a stationary Trolley B. After the collision they move off together. Velocity afterwards?
mass X Velocity = momentum.

Answer
Using conservation of momentum, the total momentum before is the total momentum afterwards. (before) mom = 0.2 X 1.5 = 0.3 kgm/s
(after) 0.3 = 0.5 (0.2+0.3) * Velocity
Velocity = 0.6 m/s


In white btw
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Princeoftermina
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(Original post by Robbie10538)
Good idea!

Trolley A of 200 grams moving at 1.5m/s to the right collides with a stationary Trolley B. Trolley B weighs 100 grams more than Trolley A. After the collision they move off together. Calulate the velocity that they move off. Include units in your answer. You may use the equation mass = momentum/velocity.

hint

Answer


In white btw
Wow- that was nicely made! I think that's what AQA will make us do- rearranging equations, realising we don't need some parts, not to mention the 'trolley B weighs 100grams more than trolley A' bit.

Gave it a try and got there in the end. Thanks Robbie!
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Ahmed_7
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An ice skater of mass 60kg travelling at a velocity of 3.0m/s bumps into a stationary child skater of mass 30kg on the ice and they move together after the collision.

A: Calculate the momentum of the ice skater before the collision.
B: Show that the ice skater and the child skater moved at a velocity of 2.0m/s after the collision.

(I stole this from AQA's activity sheet )
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Twitchy
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One of the questions I got in a mock P3 asked you to explain why waves of different frequencies diffract more or less than each other. I think this was referring to sound waves.
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The smaller the wavelength, the smaller the number of particles that will be affected in a wave's path. If a particle is affected by a wave, this effect will be transmitted to surrounding molecules through electromagnetism, and so the wave will spread out (diffract). So waves of a higher frequency diffract less than waves of lower frequencies.
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BHAM!
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was there any hard questions in the january physics paper? sorry i dont have a copy u c
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BHAM!
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okay i know this isnt really hard but i found it difficult 2 explain and i remember readin it sumwer. Why is it that when we touch a dusty tv screen we sometimes hear a crackling sound and feel a small shock? does the screen get discharged to earth?
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Princeoftermina
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(Original post by BHAM!)
was there any hard questions in the january physics paper? sorry i dont have a copy u c
Oh, there were many:

An aircraft has a take off mass of 320, 000kg. Each of the 4 engines can produce a maximum force of 240kn.

Use the equation in the box to calculate the maximum acceleration of the aircraft.

*box* resultant force= mass x acceleration *box*

Show clearly how you work out your answer and give the unit.

(3 marks).
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j1991
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...
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toby_ling
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(Original post by j1991)
So seriously Do you guys think Physics 2 will be hard?

Because I think I've done well in Biology 2 and Chemitry 2 and my coursework was an A*

So I don't wanna be messing up now....
Considering you did well in those two and the ISA, you don't have much to worry about. If I was you, I'd put Physics second on my subject list. Just don't screw up big time on the Physics, though!

My ISA was 100%, however my Biology exam was dire! Hopefully Chem and Physics will come to the rescue!
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j1991
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^^^ Thanks for that!
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Robbie10538
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(Original post by Princeoftermina)
Oh, there were many:

An aircraft has a take off mass of 320, 000kg. Each of the 4 engines can produce a maximum force of 240kn.

Use the equation in the box to calculate the maximum acceleration of the aircraft.

*box* resultant force= mass x acceleration *box*

Show clearly how you work out your answer and give the unit.

(3 marks).
Thanks- I should have put troley B is 0.1kg more than trolley A to be more realistic of AQA , here is my attempt at that question

Spoiler:
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I dont know what "kn" is. I assume its kilo-newtons i.e. 240000 newtons

so intergrating the values I get (240000 X 4) = 320000 X A
which leaves A as 3 so 3m/s2 ?
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