An inspector calls help Watch

springrollz
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Hi, im terrible at inspector calls and need help so if somebody wants to mark this i would appreciate it. Thanks


Throughout the play, Priestly presents Mrs Birling as a highly ignorant woman towards the working class due to her own efforts to detach herself from them. During Mrs Birling’s interrogation in Act Two, we as the audience see her repeatedly detach herself from the working class in general when referring to Eva Smith as ‘a girl of that sort’. Consequently, the audience learn that Sybil dehumanises the lower class through the use of the determiner “that” - here, Priestley emphasises Mrs Birling’s efforts to almost physically distance herself from working class women because “that” creates the image of something being physically distant. Mrs Birling’s attitude here is somewhat ironic, considering she chooses to work for the ‘Brumley women’s charity organisation’ yet turns away a woman in need. This further amplifies her complete lack of association with the lower class as is confirms that her reason for turning away Eva Smith is completely because of her class, emphasising her prejudiced nature. Mrs Birling is again shown to dehumanise the lower class by referring to it as’that class’. Here,there is an extreme generalisation of the working class women. Gtg
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Davy611
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Throughout the play, Priestley presents Mrs Birling as a highly ignorant woman; she is especially unpleasant towards the working class and her own efforts to detach herself from them are made obvious. She is a product of a conservative Victorian society. During Mrs Birling’s interrogation in Act Two, we as the audience, see her repeatedly detach herself from any association with the working class in general when referring to Eva Smith as ‘a girl of that sort’. Consequently, the audience learn that Sybil dehumanises the lower class through the use of the determiner “that” - here, Priestley emphasises Mrs Birling’s efforts to almost physically distance herself from working class women because “that” creates the image of something being physically distant. Mrs Birling’s attitude here is somewhat ironic, considering she chooses to work for the ‘Brumley women’s charity organisation’ yet turns away a woman in need. This makes the audience question her motives for this 'charity' work. Is it to satisfy her own ego? Her complete lack of association with the lower classes is emphasised as her reason for turning away Eva Smith is completely because of her class: her prejudiced nature is clear. She is guilty of holding an extremely generalised opinion of the working class women at best; at worst, she lacks humanity and compassion on a grand scale.

Hi. This is a good paragraph of analysis. I've made some minor changes to aid fluency. If you were to write three paragraphs of this quality with an appropriate introduction and conclusion then you could expect to attain around about grade 7.
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Davy611
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By the way, you're clearly not 'terrible' at 'An Inspector Calls'
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springrollz
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Hi, thank you so much for your help!!
(Original post by Davy611)
Throughout the play, Priestley presents Mrs Birling as a highly ignorant woman; she is especially unpleasant towards the working class and her own efforts to detach herself from them are made obvious. She is a product of a conservative Victorian society. During Mrs Birling’s interrogation in Act Two, we as the audience, see her repeatedly detach herself from any association with the working class in general when referring to Eva Smith as ‘a girl of that sort’. Consequently, the audience learn that Sybil dehumanises the lower class through the use of the determiner “that” - here, Priestley emphasises Mrs Birling’s efforts to almost physically distance herself from working class women because “that” creates the image of something being physically distant. Mrs Birling’s attitude here is somewhat ironic, considering she chooses to work for the ‘Brumley women’s charity organisation’ yet turns away a woman in need. This makes the audience question her motives for this 'charity' work. Is it to satisfy her own ego? Her complete lack of association with the lower classes is emphasised as her reason for turning away Eva Smith is completely because of her class: her prejudiced nature is clear. She is guilty of holding an extremely generalised opinion of the working class women at best; at worst, she lacks humanity and compassion on a grand scale.

Hi. This is a good paragraph of analysis. I've made some minor changes to aid fluency. If you were to write three paragraphs of this quality with an appropriate introduction and conclusion then you could expect to attain around about grade 7.
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