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    I want to improve my vocabulary and spelling. As i was writing that i had to check how to spell vocabulary to ensure i got it right.

    I think its because alot of the time i use a computer and when i don't know how to spell either the checker does it for me, or i google the word.

    It's not all words, just the ones that are spelt funny, like successful.

    I want to broaden my vocabulary aswell. Alot of the members on here inspire me with there large words. Honestly.

    I already read loads of technical manuals due to the nature of my work but never manage to remember many of the bigger words.

    Any ideas?
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    Read! Seriously, best way to improve your vocabulary, spelling, sentence structure... whatever, reading's the answer.
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    Read fiction? Also, try and type with all correct spellings and no abbreviations and whenever you come across a word you can't spell or don't understand, look it up. You will soon learn new words. I learnt how to spell abbreviations today.
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    It's really good that you want to learn I'd suggest reading if you don't already (you'll spot new words, you'll be reading words that you might often spell wrong) and becoming more aware of words that you do see everyday, whether it's in books, newspapers, magazines or online. Even if you *are* using spell checker, try and remember the corrected version of the word that you got wrong.

    For things like successful, we learnt about "rules" in English class. If you kept them, dig up your old exercise and grammar/vocab books and take a look through them. Maybe there are textbooks in your local library?

    I do think it's good that you're willing to learn, so good luck.
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    (Original post by upturnedpalms)
    Read! Seriously, best way to improve your vocabulary, spelling, sentence structure... whatever, reading's the answer.
    But i do. I never read novels or fiction but more technical manuals and computer related books; some of the words in them are difficult to understand.
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    I was about to say the same thing - it's really commendable that you really actively want to improve. Most people don't care.

    As well as reading more, change your routine when you're writing - try and spell the word by yourself first, and then look it up to check yourself. You could even test yourself at the end of every week if you want to get really serious - write down all the words that you find difficult during the week and then test yourself on them at the weekend using the Look, Cover, Write, Check method.
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    Read! :p:

    It is the best way to improve. If you don't mind reading newspapers, it's well worth reading them as the journalists have to communicate the information clearly and concisely. This will gradually develop your frame of mind in terms of phrasing, sentence structure as well develop your vocabulary. Obviously steer clear of the tabloids such as the Sun, Mirror and Star and stick to the likes of the Guardian, Times, Telegraph etc.

    Reading good fiction also helps a lot. However, you got to be a lot more patient with it as you have to plough through a book. I myself love fantasy reads (good epic ones as well) which take quite a while to read as they are several hundred pages.

    The newspapers are the easiest option as you can read articles into topics you are interested in e.g, science, politics, sport etc and can also gain knowledge in that area as you go along. You don't even have to buy the paper, they all have websites with tons of articles on them. The BBC is a great source as well.

    Hope that helps.
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    subscribe to the word of the day http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/list/

    every day you receive an email from the dictionary that includes definitions of the word and texts where the word is used. you can use that word a couple of times during the day when you're speaking to family and friends, works amazingly well lol
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    Best way is too read - sorry if you don't like doing it but it's the best way
    Find a subject you enjoy and then read as many books as you can about it. Work your way up from the basics, even dropping down an age grade to start easily, and then get to the classics. The added bonus if that it expands your mind as well.
    Go for more modern books to begin with. I doubt anyone would set you Shakespeare to begin with but you don't want to end up speaking like Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray) or Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo).

    www.freerice.com is kinda fun for new big words

    If you can on your PC, don't get your Spellchecker to automatically change the word, but just to underline it. Then go back through it and see what it recommends the word is. Might help.

    Well done for wanting to improve yourself
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    purplefrog - while I agree with everything else you've said, I don't agree about the BBC being a good source. I've just read an article on there with some of the most awful syntax you've ever seen, and I see spelling mistakes on there sometimes as well.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    purplefrog - while I agree with everything else you've said, I don't agree about the BBC being a good source. I've just read an article on there with some of the most awful syntax you've ever seen, and I see spelling mistakes on there sometimes as well.
    Better than The Sun
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    I like that Free Rice site. I just learn't what obnoxious means, probably because i am just that at times.
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    (Original post by Mrgd291190)
    Better than The Sun
    Not difficult
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    (Original post by cascadingstylez)
    I like that Free Rice site. I just learn't what obnoxious means, probably because i am just that at times.
    No probs, have a good time

    Sure you're not
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Not difficult
    I'd love to do one of those Reading Age tests on an article from the Sun

    Probably about age 7 or something :rolleyes:
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    I might also dedicate 30 mins (i mean minutes) a day before bed to read the Dictionary. I knew someone that did this but he was a brain box anyway.
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    Dictionary is boring. Get some fiction books from the library and read them; longer/expressive words are much more memorable when in context.
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    You'll be an expert on everything from Aardvark to Avocado in no time
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    What I do is when I read a book with some particularly hard words in it, write them down. If you don't know what they mean, make a note of a definition too. Then just look back to them every now and then. It does work, seriously.
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    If I encounter a new word then I make a flip card for it, with the definition on the other side, and review it every few days. (The longer I've known it, the less I review it.) Using this method, I have learned over 150 new words in a single month.
 
 
 
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