mangofarmer
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I currently study maths A Level, but not economics. I've decided to pursue economics at uni, but I'm worried my lack of experience in economics will set me back. Mostly because people are so dumbfounded whenever I tell them I want to study economics.

Does anyone have any advice? Also, what is the best way to make sure I am making the right decision to study this? I'm so scared I'm making an uninformed choice.
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rosieredcheeks1
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This is probably not that bad but there’s basic economic theory you learn in A Level economics. Your peers who have done the a level will have tons of knowledge they already know that you don’t. This isn’t bad as long as you’re willing to work hard. Also, consider this: you can’t take a mathematics degree without doing a level maths so why take an economics degree without doing economics?
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euphoricat
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(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
I currently study maths A Level, but not economics. I've decided to pursue economics at uni, but I'm worried my lack of experience in economics will set me back. Mostly because people are so dumbfounded whenever I tell them I want to study economics.

Does anyone have any advice? Also, what is the best way to make sure I am making the right decision to study this? I'm so scared I'm making an uninformed choice.
Why did you decide to read economics? Have you read any economics books, The Economist, watch economics lectures, etc.? And if so, are you genuinely interested? Many people go for any economics degree without having studied it at A level so you aren't alone. It may be a good idea to gain some exposure in the summer. May I ask what uni this is?
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mangofarmer
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As I enjoy Mathematics and my EPQ was based on an economics topic. I'm not 100% sure which uni yet, I guess the best ones I can get into without experience.
(Original post by euphoricat)
Why did you decide to read economics? Have you read any economics books, The Economist, watch economics lectures, etc.? And if so, are you genuinely interested? Many people go for any economics degree without having studied it at A level so you aren't alone. It may be a good idea to gain some exposure in the summer. May I ask what uni this is?
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mangofarmer
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Oh that is very true. I'm really uncertain of what to do now.
(Original post by rosieredcheeks1)
This is probably not that bad but there’s basic economic theory you learn in A Level economics. Your peers who have done the a level will have tons of knowledge they already know that you don’t. This isn’t bad as long as you’re willing to work hard. Also, consider this: you can’t take a mathematics degree without doing a level maths so why take an economics degree without doing economics?
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by rosieredcheeks1)
Also, consider this: you can’t take a mathematics degree without doing a level maths so why take an economics degree without doing economics?
By that reasoning, students should only take degrees in subjects they studied at A-level which would be more than a little silly. There wouldn't be many engineers or doctors...
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rosieredcheeks1
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(Original post by ageshallnot)
By that reasoning, students should only take degrees in subjects they studied at A-level which would be more than a little silly. There wouldn't be many engineers or doctors...
I agree but it’s only crucial when the unis require you to. Also, there’s no harm in getting prior knowledge on a degree either.
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ageshallnot
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(Original post by rosieredcheeks1)
I agree but it’s only crucial when the unis require you to. Also, there’s no harm in getting prior knowledge on a degree either.
And in this case it is absolutely NOT essential for the OP to study economics at A-level.
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Dat1Guy
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I've just finished my 1st year of economics at Warwick- i didn't do maths EDIT *ECONOMICS at A-level (ofc i did maths.. it's necessary!! If you have any questions, shoot them my way
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mangofarmer
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Thanks so much! I hear Warwick is great for economics, congratulations on studying there! I have quite a lot of questions, it would be great if you could please help me by answering them.

You say you didn't take maths A Level, but did you take economics A Level?
What experiences, reading or 'proof' of being interested in economics did you put in your personal statement?
Is the course very mathematical, or more essay based?
What are some essay questions you have been given?
Best and worst bits of studying for an economics degree?
(Original post by Dat1Guy)
I've just finished my 1st year of economics at Warwick- i didn't do maths at A-level! If you have any questions, shoot them my way
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bpn365
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I do economics at Warwick. I'm confused that the previous replier didn't do maths a level as you have to have maths a level or equivalent to do economics (L100) at Warwick. I know for the the joint degrees you don't need maths a level as they do different modules but for pure economics an A in A level maths is a requirement.

Firstly, I wouldn't worry about not having economics at a level. Although the majority do have it, several people don't and a lot of the content is quite different to the a level stuff so I wouldn't worry at all. I know lots of people who don't have it and it hasn't been a problem for them. To be honest, I'd say that doing S2 and FP1 for further maths are more important than having economics at a level, though I know that around half of economics students have further maths a level so I wouldn't worry about this either. Maths, however, is definitely your most important a level as there is lots of calculus and statistics. Having maths A level is far more important than having economics A level.

I put several books on my personal statement, including Tim Harford, Cathy O'Neil and Joseph Stiglitz. I don't think the personal statement is that highly valued by Warwick, but it is important to show an interest in economics and a broad understanding of it, especially as you haven't done the a level.

The Warwick pure economics course is a lot more mathematical than essay based. I only submitted three essays all year and all of these were only 1200 words. Micro, maths and stats have no essay writing; economic history is completely essay based; and macro has a mixture of essay writing and maths.

The macroeconomics essay question was about the potential trade off between inequality and deficit reduction.
For economic history, for each essay there was a choice of 5 questions. These tended to be debate style questions on different topics you'd learned.
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
Thanks so much! I hear Warwick is great for economics, congratulations on studying there! I have quite a lot of questions, it would be great if you could please help me by answering them.

You say you didn't take maths A Level, but did you take economics A Level?
What experiences, reading or 'proof' of being interested in economics did you put in your personal statement?
Is the course very mathematical, or more essay based?
What are some essay questions you have been given?
Best and worst bits of studying for an economics degree?
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Nununu
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(Original post by mangofarmer)
Oh that is very true. I'm really uncertain of what to do now.
You absolutely do not need to do Economics at A level to study it at degree levels. Don't listen to that person.
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rajbrown
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(Original post by Dat1Guy)
I've just finished my 1st year of economics at Warwick- i didn't do maths EDIT *ECONOMICS at A-level (ofc i did maths.. it's necessary!! If you have any questions, shoot them my way
Hello, im thinking of doing economics at uni or maths, but can't decide which. I've heard maths is a bit more "abstract" at uni, is economics maths heavy or lots of essays and writing? or both ahah?
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returnmigrant
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Maths is the crucial subject - if students have that ability/aptitude then you can teach them Economics, it doesnt necessarily work the other way around.

Low down on Applying For Economics here : https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Economics_Degree
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ml55
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(Original post by Dat1Guy)
I've just finished my 1st year of economics at Warwick- i didn't do maths EDIT *ECONOMICS at A-level (ofc i did maths.. it's necessary!! If you have any questions, shoot them my way
hey, do you have any recommendations for prior reading considering i wanna do an economics degree and am not doing econ a level
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by ml55)
hey, do you have any recommendations for prior reading considering i wanna do an economics degree and am not doing econ a level
This one would give you a good start and be useful reference later on : "Economics" Sloman and Guest - make sure you get the most recent edition, I think they are up to the 10th by now. You can prob get 2nd hand copies on Ebay etc
Or, if you want something really brief to start with, Very Short Introductions 'Economics' and 'Economic History' provide a good summary and ideas about future reading. You also might find this reading list from Warwick useful - https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/econom...-reading-list/
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Dat1Guy
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(Original post by ml55)
hey, do you have any recommendations for prior reading considering i wanna do an economics degree and am not doing econ a level
Strictly there's no prior knowledge necessary for most econ degress (warwick included); what would definitely help is just understanding the basics of economics. The very short introduction to micro/macro is a heavy read and i'd say probably too detailed to be of any use - i remember reading it and didn't take much of it in, it's like reading a textbook in an area you haven't covered yet in class. Your best bet is to read the economist and financial times, try and understand supply and demand ideas, global economic trends and economies of scale etc.

There's a lot of interesting things going on in the world at the moment from the trade war, Brexit, Argentina's political turmoil linked with the huge accumulated sovereign debt.

I hope that helps, remember, it's best to have a good overview of economics rather know any particular areas in detail
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