I want to flat share with people I don't know. How does it work? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
Let's say I go on spareroom.com and find a house to share with people around my age that I don't know.


Would I need to give my ID/bank statements/references etc. to the people my age who already live there, for them to give to the landlord?

Or would I go straight to the landlord? If so, would the landlord then ask the housemates if they agree and possibly show them all of my ID details?

Thank you
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999tigger
Badges: 19
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
Let's say I go on spareroom.com and find a house to share with people around my age that I don't know.


Would I need to give my ID/bank statements/references etc. to the people my age who already live there, for them to give to the landlord?

Or would I go straight to the landlord? If so, would the landlord then ask the housemates if they agree and possibly show them all of my ID details?

Thank you
1. Nope references and id are nothing to do with the tenants and you should not provide them.
2. In rare circumstances your agreement is with the head tenant and they sub let the room to you hence they become the kind of LL. This is rare and sometimes they have no legal authority to sub let. It depends.
3. You are more likely to be dealing with the LL or letting agents and the references etc should be dealt with through them.
4. If you find somewhere, then make sure you think you will be compatible with the tenants, they may or may not want you there. It is very important you get this right. Do not agree to move in somewhere without feeling absolutely sure as once you agree and sign then you are committed for the year. It will be difficult to get out of. Be sure to check about how bills are handled as well as. Check the kitchen and bathroom plus preferably meet all housemates. You need to assess them carefully about whether you can live with such people.
5. Post back if they start demanding documents along with the context of the situation. I dont see any harm in showing them your uni id card so they can establish you are a student.
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Anonymous #1
#3
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
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(Original post by 999tigger)
1. Nope references and id are nothing to do with the tenants and you should not provide them.
2. In rare circumstances your agreement is with the head tenant and they sub let the room to you hence they become the kind of LL. This is rare and sometimes they have no legal authority to sub let. It depends.
3. You are more likely to be dealing with the LL or letting agents and the references etc should be dealt with through them.
4. If you find somewhere, then make sure you think you will be compatible with the tenants, they may or may not want you there. It is very important you get this right. Do not agree to move in somewhere without feeling absolutely sure as once you agree and sign then you are committed for the year. It will be difficult to get out of. Be sure to check about how bills are handled as well as. Check the kitchen and bathroom plus preferably meet all housemates. You need to assess them carefully about whether you can live with such people.
5. Post back if they start demanding documents along with the context of the situation. I dont see any harm in showing them your uni id card so they can establish you are a student.
ahh thank you! so in theory some weird old man could go up to a landlord and say he wants to move into this house with these younger people, and if the landlord has no issues with it, he will move in without the housemates permission?!
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999tigger
Badges: 19
#4
Report 3 months ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
ahh thank you! so in theory some weird old man could go up to a landlord and say he wants to move into this house with these younger people, and if the landlord has no issues with it, he will move in without the housemates permission?!
Depends on the LL and the way the property is let.
Sometimes LL lets out rooms so its up to the LL to fill them. Think of a hotel.
Other times he lets out the whole house which means its the responsibility of the current tenants to pay the rent and if they are one short then that is the students problem so they are keen to find another occupant so they arent paying for an empty room. I would say this is the more likely scenario.

Anyway the point is make sure you assess the flatmates and look around before committing.
Last edited by 999tigger; 3 months ago
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Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
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ty
(Original post by 999tigger)
Depends on the LL and the way the property is let.
Sometimes LL lets out rooms so its up to the LL to fill them. Think of a hotel.
Other times he lets out the whole house which means its the responsibility of the current tenants to pay the rent and if they are one short then that is the students problem so they are keen to find another occupant so they arent paying for an empty room. I would say this is the more likely scenario.

Anyway the point is make sure you assess the flatmates and look around before committing.
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