MFL good career? Watch

Vanessa Rose 01
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Can modern foreign languages lead to any highly paid jobs? I'm passionate about languages but I want a really successful career at the same time... Is anyone able to advise me please?

I'm choosing my A Level subjects for this year so your advice will be really useful for that.
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HannahLGriffiths
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Definitely! Linguists are so highly sought after atm in the UK so it is 100% a viable career path. I recently saw a job on Indeed for a German-speaker to translate game commentary. It will open so many doors!
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Vanessa Rose 01)
Can modern foreign languages lead to any highly paid jobs? I'm passionate about languages but I want a really successful career at the same time... Is anyone able to advise me please?

I'm choosing my A Level subjects for this year so your advice will be really useful for that.
Yes. A lot of high paying jobs do not require a degree in a specific subject.
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HannahLGriffiths
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Yes. A lot of high paying jobs do not require a degree in a specific subject.
MFL jobs usually require a degree or the person to be native e.g. German living in the UK
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Quick-use
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(Original post by Vanessa Rose 01)
Can modern foreign languages lead to any highly paid jobs? I'm passionate about languages but I want a really successful career at the same time... Is anyone able to advise me please?

I'm choosing my A Level subjects for this year so your advice will be really useful for that.
Languages are very highly sought after and eternally rewarding!

At university, I did French, Spanish and Japanese. After graduating, I did some freelance interpreting in Japan while working at a private firm assisting medical and business clients with English translation. Now, I'm back to studying in the UK and am applying for postgraduate courses in International Relations with the hope of applying for the British diplomatic service.

My friends who did a Japanese degree have gone onto the following jobs: working in immigration offices in Japan, working in local Japanese governments such as Fukushima, Beppu and Kyoto (one such example: https://rediscoverfukushima.com/), working at the consulate general (embassy) in Edinburgh, working for the NHK (Japan's version of BBC) in both Tokyo and London, investment banking, working in Japanese translation (environmental and video games), practicing Law in Japan, working at a local sake brewery in Okayama (https://www.originsake.com/?fbclid=I...0neClapyuUuqyY), lecturing at universities in Japan and the UK and so on and so forth.

My university friends who studied French and Spanish have gone onto working at the European Parliament, investment banking, tourism and so on.

When you study a languages degree, you don't just study the language. For example, during my undergraduate degree I took various modules on Japan-China foreign policy, international relations, politics, French immigration laws, Spanish journalism writing etc. What's more, regarding the language component of our degrees, there were modules consisting of translations of dense political documents, medical documents, historical religious documents, both classical and contemporary literary texts as well as journalistic articles among many others.

Although I don't regret studying languages at university, I might have considered studying something like Economics or International Relations alongside a language or two because recently I've realised that those are the fields that I'd like to apply my linguistic background in. That said, when I first applied to university I didn't know what I wanted to do, so in that sense I was a little lost because my degree wasn't focused on a specific career. But, the good thing was that languages can be applicable to many different sectors.

If you'd like to do languages, go for it. If you'd like to do languages + something like Law/Economics/IR/whatever, go for that too. If you're not sure at all, maybe consider a Scottish university where you study 3 subjects equally in your first 2 years. You can do 2 languages + another subject in almost anything. Gradually, you can decide to continue your degree with your 2 languages or 1 language + your other subject or just 1 language.

Originally, I remember thinking that I wanted to be an interpreter or a translator. Now, I'm pretty sure that I want to join either the diplomatic service or go into academia. :fluffy:

I'm also going to tag another fellow language graduate IzzyAnne.
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