Balancing redox in basic solution help!!!!

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Rasaa22
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Hi guys, I have just balanced a redox reaction in a basic solution, everything adds ups, apart from the charges at the end...
I’ve got -4 on one side and -2 on the other. Is it normal for the charges to not balance sometimes? And if so, what is it this called?
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Interea
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As far as I'm aware your charges should balance in a redox equation (unless I'm misunderstanding you). Could you possibly post what you've got?
(Original post by Rasaa22)
Hi guys, I have just balanced a redox reaction in a basic solution, everything adds ups, apart from the charges at the end...
I’ve got -4 on one side and -2 on the other. Is it normal for the charges to not balance sometimes? And if so, what is it this called?
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Rasaa22
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Yes, question: HCN > CO3^2- + NH3. In a basic solution. (CO3^2- as in Carbon and 3 oxygen with -2 ion charge)

Ended up:
4OH- + HCN > CO3^2- + NH3 + H2O
The atoms balance but not the charge
(Original post by Interea)
As far as I'm aware your charges should balance in a redox equation (unless I'm misunderstanding you). Could you possibly post what you've got?
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Interea
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I think in this case you can just add electrons to balance the charges, as it is not a full redox equation (i.e. combining 2 half equations). See what anyone else says though, I've got a headache so I'm not exactly with it right now...
(Original post by Rasaa22)
Yes, question: HCN > CO3^2- + NH3. In a basic solution. (CO3^2- as in Carbon and 3 oxygen with -2 ion charge)

Ended up:
4OH- + HCN > CO3^2- + NH3 + H2O
The atoms balance but not the charge
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Rasaa22
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THANK YOU SO MUCH! That’s exactly what I thought, adding electrons at the end to balance the charge. But I wondered if there was any rules, and what does it mean by ‘not a full redox equation’
Sorry to hear it, hope you feel better soon!! Xxxx
(Original post by Interea)
I think in this case you can just add electrons to balance the charges, as it is not a full redox equation (i.e. combining 2 half equations). See what anyone else says though, I've got a headache so I'm not exactly with it right now...
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Interea
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Sometimes they refer to equations with electrons and only either oxidation or reduction as half equations, and then when you combine a reduction and oxidation equation (balancing to cancel out electrons) you get a full redox equation.
(Original post by Rasaa22)
THANK YOU SO MUCH! That’s exactly what I thought, adding electrons at the end to balance the charge. But I wondered if there was any rules, and what does it mean by ‘not a full redox equation’
Sorry to hear it, hope you feel better soon!! Xxxx
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