Court of Appeal: UK weapons sales to Saudi Arabia UNLAWFUL Watch

Palmyra
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UK arms sales to Saudi Arabia unlawful, court of appeal declares

"Ruling prompts government to suspend new arms sales to Saudi Arabia while it urgently reviews its processes.

British arms sales to Saudi Arabia have been declared unlawful by the court of appeal because ministers failed to properly assess their contribution to civilian casualties in indiscriminate bombing in Yemen.

The unexpected ruling has prompted the British government to suspend new arms sales to Saudi Arabia while it urgently reviews its processes – although Liam Fox, the international trade secretary, has said the government would also seek to appeal.

The appeal court judges had been asked by Campaign Against Arms Trade whether the UK’s sales of arms to Saudi Arabia for use in the Yemeni civil war was in breach of its own international humanitarian law guidance. They concluded that the decision making process was “wrong in law in one significant respect” and told Fox to launch an immediate review over concerns that British licensed bombs were killing civilians in Yemen.

Announcing the court’s decision, Sir Terence Etherton, the master of the rolls, said the government “made no concluded assessments of whether the Saudi-led coalition had committed violations of international humanitarian law in the past, during the Yemen conflict, and made no attempt to do so”. Etherton, sitting alongside Lord Justice Irwin and Lord Justice Singh, said ministers must now reconsider the arms sales approval process and “must then estimate the future risks” of breaches to international humanitarian law “in light of their conclusions about the past”.

Shortly after the ruling Fox made an emergency statement to the Commons and confirmed that the government would seek to appeal. “We are carefully considering the implications of the judgment for decision-making,” Fox told MPs. “While we do this, we will not grant any new licences for export to Saudi Arabia and its coalition partners which might be used in the conflict in Yemen,” the minister added.

The UK has licensed the sale of at least £4.7bn worth of arms to Saudi Arabia since the start of the civil war in Yemen in March 2015, with most of the recorded sales taking place before 2018. Both Johnson and Hunt have defended the UK’s arms relationship with Riyadh, although other European countries have halted sales. Germany said it would no longer supply arms following the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi by Saudi agents in Istanbul last autumn.

Latest figures estimate that the death toll in the complex civil war in Yemen since 2016 is fast approaching 100,000 – although there is currently a partial ceasefire – with nearly 11,700 civilians killed in attacks that have directly targeted them."

https://www.theguardian.com/law/2019...lared-unlawful
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londonmyst
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Finally.
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Notoriety
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Appeal court judges.

I thought they were called Lord Justices of Appeal.

What have they been teaching you at Anglia Ruskin?
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Appeal court judges.

I thought they were called Lord Justices of Appeal.

What have they been teaching you at Anglia Ruskin?
tbf the article was probably written by an English Lit grad from Exeter
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ByEeek
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I always found it bizarre that morals, ethics and laws are applied to the creation of devices designed to kill.
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Trotsky's Iceaxe
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But but but the authoritarian wahhabist regime in Saudi Arabia is a friend and ally of our Conservative government. A few dead children is a worthy price to pay for continuing to support the British arms industry.
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modifiedgenes
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(Original post by ByEeek)
I always found it bizarre that morals, ethics and laws are applied to the creation of devices designed to kill.
I agree. It appears that the government are very happy to have a huge arms industry based in the UK but seem to have a peculiar hope that these same companies won't ever sell their products to anyone who might use them on anyone else.

Selling weapons to Saudi Arabia or similar is a moot point; we are already doing business with them and have diplomatic ties for other reasons and how their government and country operates is no mystery to anyone. We should be ashamed.
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Prussianxo
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It's only taken the Saudi arms sales to make the highest percentage of Britain's GDP to realise it's probably not a good idea to sell arms to a government with terrorist links.
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Palmyra
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(Original post by ByEeek)
I always found it bizarre that morals, ethics and laws are applied to the creation of devices designed to kill.
So you see no difference between drone strikes that target specific military targets (ammo depots or terrorist leaders) and strikes that spread fragments of metal etc at great spread across a 100m blast radius, brutally piercing the skin of everyone they indiscriminately come into contact with and inflict a horrific, prolonged death on (for example)?
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ByEeek
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(Original post by Palmyra)
So you see no difference between drone strikes that target specific military targets (ammo depots or terrorist leaders) and strikes that spread fragments of metal etc at great spread across a 100m blast radius, brutally piercing the skin of everyone they indiscriminately come into contact with and inflict a horrific, prolonged death on (for example)?
Interesting that you mention drone strikes. How on earth can you be 100% you are hitting an ammo store based on grainy satellite images. How would you feel if drones started hovering over your house and started watching you and your family? How would you feel if those drones then started attacking your community? If ever there was a weapon of terror it is an unmanned drone.

At keast you have the opportunity to attemp to avoid a grenade and take action to get the chap who lobbed it at you. The communities of rural Pakistan and Afghanistan are helpless to do anything about US drone strikes that are conducted from thousands of miles away.
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Palmyra
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Interesting that you mention drone strikes. How on earth can you be 100% you are hitting an ammo store based on grainy satellite images. How would you feel if drones started hovering over your house and started watching you and your family? How would you feel if those drones then started attacking your community? If ever there was a weapon of terror it is an unmanned drone.

At keast you have the opportunity to attemp to avoid a grenade and take action to get the chap who lobbed it at you. The communities of rural Pakistan and Afghanistan are helpless to do anything about US drone strikes that are conducted from thousands of miles away.
No answer? :cool:
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