Can a psychiatrist prescribe antidepressants that GPs can’t access? Watch

Anonymous #1
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Awaiting a referral to psychiatrist however growing impatient, I’m struggling unfortunately. Question pretty self explanatory
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Anonymous #2
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Do you know why the GP can’t access the medication ? Psychiatrist are medical doctors and able to prescribe medication
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Anonymous #1
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Sorry, I’m just wondering whether psychiatrists can access antidepressants that GPs can’t because of their specialism and because they’re dealing with more complicated/severe cases
(Original post by Anonymous)
Do you know why the GP can’t access the medication ? Psychiatrist are medical doctors and able to prescribe medication
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black tea
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sorry, I’m just wondering whether psychiatrists can access antidepressants that GPs can’t because of their specialism and because they’re dealing with more complicated/severe cases
I don't think there are any antidepressants that only psychiatrists can prescribe, but they might have more experience is using some less common antidepressants.
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StormyOcean
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The answer is a yes but no answer. So GPs can prescribe antidepressants and quite a few however usually if the patient is under the age of 18 or has tried a few with no success a referral to a psychiatrist will be made for a full assessment to make sure antidepressants are the correct treatment, and they can use their specialist knowledge to select the right one. Depending on what trust you fall under based on your location really depends on what GPs can prescribe and do. When I moved from one area of the country to another I had to stop taking my tricyclic antidepressant and move to a different one as GPs couldn't prescribe it at that practice. As a general rule I think most GPs can prescribe SSRIs (fluoxitine, sertraline and citalopram) and some SNRI's as these cause the least side effects. It is TCAs and MAOIs that probably need a psychiatrist. However I am not a professional, just a patient. Maybe book a GP appointment and talk to them? It might be worth also looking into counselling in the meantime as waiting lists can be very long!
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suitepee
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Awaiting a referral to psychiatrist however growing impatient, I’m struggling unfortunately. Question pretty self explanatory
Not a doctor, but a mental health social worker. In my area there are not restrictions as such, but the GP will not prescribe certain medications that require a specialist assessment. e.g. some rarer antidepressants, lithium, mood stabilisers, antipsychotics. However, once prescribed by a psychiatrist, the GP will do the repeat. In some areas, if you are on a significant dose of antipsychotics then you will always need to be under the care of a psychiatrist.

Just a side note - it's not always about antidepressants with depression - often if someone is deemed "treatment resistant" I've seen psychiatrists try having someone on both an antidepressant and a antipsychotic/mood stabiliser - it can be much more effective than some of the older antidepressants. Plus the old antidepressants can have a bad side effect profile.
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