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    I'm doing IB next year and I just want to know how it's like in general.

    1) Is there a lot of coursework or is it more exam based?

    2) How is maths standard? Is it a lot harder than Higher GCSE Maths?

    3) Any suggestions for CAS? I already do quite a bit of sports and play a few instruments, but I don't think its enough. I don't do much community service and the last time I did it, I found it slightly tedious (I was doing the basic filing papers, gluing bits of paper). Any ideas for more enjoyable choices?

    4) What do you do in theory of knowledge exactly?

    5) Can the extended essay be on just about anything that is curriculum based?

    6) I'm doing higher english so I have to study 15 novels. Should I start reading during the summer break or would there be to much pressure and workload if I start in September?

    7) Lastly, I'm planning to take higher psychology. I've never done psychology before, so would it be too much to handle and digest?

    Any help is appreciated.
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    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    I'm doing IB next year and I just want to know how it's like in general.
    Personally, if i could take upper and power sixth all over again i would do the A-levels, it is much easier relatively to get 3 A's than 40-42+ points (the equivalent of 6 As at A-level) which is asked for by Oxbridge, Med school, etc.

    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    1) Is there a lot of coursework or is it more exam based?
    As far as i can remember most subjects have a coursework component of about 10-20%, it really depends on your choices.

    The problems come with exams, you are examined on everything you have learnt in the whole of the 2 years, a lot rides on the performance of those exams, it is a lot of work, a lot of stress and it can undo everything. With AS's and A levels it is very modular, so by the time of your last exams, you may already have a B or a C grade and if you do mess up the exam or don't get the grade you want you simply retake it, rather than retaking everything.

    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    2) How is maths standard? Is it a lot harder than Higher GCSE Maths?
    Are we talking about maths studies or maths methods? Studies is a pile of piss, my mates said the hardest topic was simultaneous equations, methods on the other hand shares many of the topics of the higher level course but in half the lesson time.

    It depends on what teacher you have, how it is taught, etc, but to give you an idea, i went from an A* at GCSE to a 4 in methods.

    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    3) Any suggestions for CAS? I already do quite a bit of sports and play a few instruments, but I don't think its enough. I don't do much community service and the last time I did it, I found it slightly tedious (I was doing the basic filing papers, gluing bits of paper). Any ideas for more enjoyable choices?
    Driving Lessons? Learning to coach in a chosen sport? Seriously, it is not difficult. There are 52 weeks in a year, the IB goes on for about 1.5/2 years, we're talking about less than an hour per week, the hours quickly rack up if you play tennis every saturday, play cricket for the local club occasionally during the summer and do your oboe lessons every wednesday evening. As for service, again, not difficult, 50 hours is 5 good days work, within a week of work experience/voluntary work your service is done.

    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    4) What do you do in theory of knowledge exactly?
    It is very much like Theology/Philosophy. We used to have debates surrounding concepts such as, 'Is it possible to have thought without knowledge?' and then the homework would be to write an essay on it. Marmite. You used to go round and round in circles with sometimes the teacher not being able to come to a conclusion, personally i hated it.

    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    5) Can the extended essay be on just about anything that is curriculum based?
    I believe it has to be in a topic that you are studying and it has to be off the syllabus.

    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    6) I'm doing higher english so I have to study 15 novels. Should I start reading during the summer break or would there be to much pressure and workload if I start in September?
    If you have the reading list already it would pay to have at least read through some literature assessments/summaries to give yourself an idea of what is actually going on and what to look out for, many are online.
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    ch0c0h01ic has basically said it all, but I'd like to add a few bits.

    IB is hard, but if you're academic you'll enjoy it. I love IB and would never want to change to A levels, but then I'm quite geeky and enyoy all of my subjects. Most people go through a phase of thinging ''Why am I doing this?!?!?!'' but most of the get over it. But I'd like to say again, it is hard.
    There is CW in most subjects and more than one CW in some, which can be stressful to get finished. Be prepaired to put your life on hold for a couple of weeks to get it done.
    Extended essay is FUN! (once you've got over the stress of finding a topic you'll enjoy writing about). It's actually very interesting to study in detail a particular topic. You can do it for any subject but it can't directly relate to anything on the syllabus or in your CW.
    If you can get the reading list, start reading. It wont do you any harm, and it might make things easier later.

    7) Lastly, I'm planning to take higher psychology. I've never done psychology before, so would it be too much to handle and digest?

    I do SL psy after not doing it at GCSE and I did find it a challenge, but not impossible. You need to keep on top of things, and make sure you understand what information applies to which question.

    If you have any more questions feel free to PM. Good luck with it
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    what is an IB

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    (Original post by malsi101)
    what is an IB

    IB stands for International Baccalaureate. It's an alternative to A levels. If you do a search you'll find atleast 1 thread about this.
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    yes, maths is much harder than GCSE maths. i went from A* GCSE maths to level 3/4 IB Higher Maths... and now ( 6 months later) level 5. this is higher level, but standard level maths isnt really that much easier.

    CAS hours arent hard to get at all. if you are learning an instrument and training for a sport, then your C and A are pretty much ok. its not that hard to get service hours either. I got them for teaching a bunch of kindergarten kids english. if you live in HK, theres quite alot of volunteer work that doesnt involve filling paper.
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    (Original post by k4di3)
    yes, maths is much harder than GCSE maths. i went from A* GCSE maths to level 3/4 IB Higher Maths... and now ( 6 months later) level 5. this is higher level, but standard level maths isnt really that much easier.
    Seconded!! But, if you try hard, and work consistently (it needs working outside of the class I think, too) you'll be fine!! I think people coming from GCSE need to have their wits about them if they want a 7 in Math though, it's a HUGE leap.
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    (Original post by FutureEconomist)
    Seconded!! But, if you try hard, and work consistently (it needs working outside of the class I think, too) you'll be fine!! I think people coming from GCSE need to have their wits about them if they want a 7 in Math though, it's a HUGE leap.
    I'm in set 3 (out of 9) for maths and most of the people in my class are doing higher. I'm wondering how they're going to manage that. I'm only doing standard method so that I can get a 6 or 7 much easier than in higher.

    I see that you do economics. I'm doing it in HL, but I'm an A* student in IGCSE economics. How's it like? Is it just basically extending the basic stuff you learnt in GCSE? I'm planning to take it in uni but i'm not sure if they'll accept me with only maths standard.
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    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    I'm in set 3 (out of 9) for maths and most of the people in my class are doing higher. I'm wondering how they're going to manage that. I'm only doing standard method so that I can get a 6 or 7 much easier than in higher.

    I see that you do economics. I'm doing it in HL, but I'm an A* student in IGCSE economics. How's it like? Is it just basically extending the basic stuff you learnt in GCSE? I'm planning to take it in uni but i'm not sure if they'll accept me with only maths standard.
    I didn't take Econ before I did the IB... so I wouldn't know. But when you start IB Econ you're not expected to have prior knowledge (so any you do have will only be helpful!!). The course start out with the absolute basics with a section of the syllabus called 'Introduction to Economics'.

    If you want to study Econ at university, most of the top universities will require (or at least prefer) Math HL. But Math SL shouldn't be too much of a problem; it's probably best to contact the universities you're interested in and ask. I know a few people who've got in to Oxford for Econ&Management with Math SL, so Math HL is obviously not essential, but it's to your advantage to do it, as you'll likely be compared to students with it.

    Say you are predicted 40 points and take Math SL, and then another student is predicted 40 points and takes Math HL, the Math HL student is more likely to get the place.
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    hey xrawriorx what school do u go to?
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    set 3 of 9 doing HL?! thats crazy. unless your school is amazingly smart. and if you want to do econ at uni your going to need maths HL, unless yous ettle for EPAIS (econ andpol) like i do :P: or ppe or something...
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    (Original post by xrawriorx)
    I'm doing IB next year and I just want to know how it's like in general.

    1) Is there a lot of coursework or is it more exam based?

    2) How is maths standard? Is it a lot harder than Higher GCSE Maths?

    3) Any suggestions for CAS? I already do quite a bit of sports and play a few instruments, but I don't think its enough. I don't do much community service and the last time I did it, I found it slightly tedious (I was doing the basic filing papers, gluing bits of paper). Any ideas for more enjoyable choices?

    4) What do you do in theory of knowledge exactly?

    5) Can the extended essay be on just about anything that is curriculum based?

    6) I'm doing higher english so I have to study 15 novels. Should I start reading during the summer break or would there be to much pressure and workload if I start in September?

    7) Lastly, I'm planning to take higher psychology. I've never done psychology before, so would it be too much to handle and digest?

    Any help is appreciated.
    1) This depends on the course. The best advice I can give is to read the syllabuses. They have a break down of how marks are weighed, and you will find it very useful.

    2) Math SL is essentially an extension of IGCSE Maths. If you found IGCSE Maths easy, you should be able to cope with Math SL without too much stress. However, do note that some Unis require HL Math for certain courses. Choose the right option!

    On a slightly different note, if you are doing HL Math I advise self-studying the A/S Math Units C1 and C2. The practise definitely helps bridge the jump.

    3) Regular weekly commitments is that fastest way to do CAS. It really builds up. Perhaps join the Orchestra or a School team? The IB really like initiative. So for Service perhaps start a Charity, or do visits to elderly people's homes. Maybe publicity work to raise awareness? Or perhaps going to primary schools to help teach.

    4) ToK focuses on epistemology. That is to say, the study of knowledge it self. It focuses a lot on yourself. How do you know yourself? How do you know what you know? It addresses reasoning and logical thinking. It really helps you form coherent arguments, so enjoy it!

    5) The EE has to be on an actual IB subject. However, it does not have to be a subject you are currently studying. I have friends doing EEs in subjects my school does not offer, but have teachers who know those areas really well.

    6) Read them over the break. No, seriously. Even for SL English I read them over Summer. It was one of the best things I did, because my teachers just launched straight into teaching in September. For me, reading them in Summer was of the best things I did. Your school might be different, but it helps to have ideas about the books beforehand. And while you read, make notes about what you understood and didn't, so you can ask your teachers about the plots and stuff when you get back.

    7) While I don't take Psych, my friends do. It's writing intensive (apparently) but you don't have to have done the GCSE. It also seems to be very fun.

    For Economics, there is no assumed knowledge so I doubt Psych will have assumed knowledge.

    Hope this all helps!
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    With IB you MUST i repeat MUST be very very organised and if you want to succeed next yeasr when you start do some work over the summer for your taken subjects! which are what by the way?
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    (Original post by Ari_ben_ami)
    With IB you MUST i repeat MUST be very very organised and if you want to succeed next yeasr when you start do some work over the summer for your taken subjects! which are what by the way?
    HL: Economics, Psychology, English
    SL: Maths (method), French, Textiles

    I don't do textiles in GCSE, but I do graphics which is similar in quite a few ways (but it doesn't interest me as much as textile/fashion desigh) and i know relatives that are in the textile industry

    hmm...i'm not too organised actually. but i can be quite motivated if i want to, so i think i can manage to change my habits without too much dificulty.

    (Original post by k4di3)
    hey xrawriorx what school do u go to?
    I got to SIS. you?

    (Original post by andy_cole2)
    set 3 of 9 doing HL?! thats crazy. unless your school is amazingly smart. and if you want to do econ at uni your going to need maths HL, unless yous ettle for EPAIS (econ andpol) like i do :P: or ppe or something...
    Are you serious? I'm not great at maths, but i'm not bad either. I suppose I might change psychology to maths higher if I get A* this summer. My school is pretty smart with mainly asian students that excel at maths so set 3 is really not all too shabby since everyone but three of the people in my class are predicted A*s.

    The thing is the maths involved in economics is rather easy (at least at GCSE level), and can all be done in a calculator. It's not like there's any complex algebra and calculus involved, is there? I just don't understand why they need higher maths because it's mainly theory based where english skills is more important?
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    Oke English i can talk to you about the rest nooooo! lol find out what your set texts are and read them this summer trust me the more you know earlier the easier it will be!
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    Hi..Well i am moving to Norway in august to apply for the IB and im really REALLY nervus. ive been reading all you all have to say and its helped me alot. to digest everything, and what im getting my self in to.
    i have no idea what i whant to study yet, im thinking of psicology. but just dont know yet. if i whant to go to uni or what. im corrently living in gran canaria Spain. So its going to be a massive change of scenery.
    So please of u have any advice if you are doing the IB in norway. please i would love to hear from you.
 
 
 

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