The new Solicitors Qualifying Exam (SQE)

Watch
UniversityOfSunderland
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Legal education and training will change in 2021 with the introduction of the new Solicitors Qualifying Exam (SQE).

We were recently joined by our own Head of Law Caroline Gibby for our podcast series to discuss the biggest shake up to legal education in decades.

In the episode we cover why and when the change is taking place, what to expect from the new assessment method and how this will affect both current and future students.

https://www.sunderland.ac.uk/study/law/

Listen here
Last edited by UniversityOfSunderland; 2 years ago
0
reply
LGBTvoice
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
The SRA have successfully put myself and many others off even attempting to enter the legal profession - as if the competition in the market wasn't enough. I'm entering my third year in studying law at university and have instead decided to follow careers in the public sector. The SQE can quite rightly go do one, all the best to it! :top:

(Original post by UniversityOfSunderland)
Legal education and training will change in 2021 with the introduction of the new Solicitors Qualifying Exam (SQE).

We were joined by our own Head of Law Caroline Gibby for our podcast series to discuss the biggest shake up to legal education in decades.

In the episode we cover why and when the change is taking place, what to expect from the new assessment method and how this will affect both current and future students.

https://www.sunderland.ac.uk/study/law/

Listen here
2
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by LGBTvoice)
The SRA have successfully put myself and many others off even attempting to enter the legal profession - as if the competition in the market wasn't enough. I'm entering my third year in studying law at university and have instead decided to follow careers in the public sector. The SQE can quite rightly go do one, all the best to it! :top:
Why has it put you off?
0
reply
LGBTvoice
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
Opening the flootgates (pardon the pun) to essentially anyone with a degree. Competition for training contracts is rife enough with people who have law degrees or have taken the GDL, let alone with those from any degree background. I've not read the fine details of the qualification but I know enough having attended interviews and firm events to have decided I don't want a career in the legal profession with this development.
Having said that, I admit I am being slightly naive as I started my legal education before the changes are to be implemented, and so I can still rely on the current system. I just deeply worry for future generations.
(Original post by Notoriety)
Why has it put you off?
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by LGBTvoice)
Opening the flootgates (pardon the pun) to essentially anyone with a degree. Competition for training contracts is rife enough with people who have law degrees or have taken the GDL, let alone with those from any degree background. I've not read the fine details of the qualification but I know enough having attended interviews and firm events to have decided I don't want a career in the legal profession with this development.
Having said that, I admit I am being slightly naive as I started my legal education before the changes are to be implemented, and so I can still rely on the current system. I just deeply worry for future generations.
I personally don't think too much will change, other than flexibility that only a small number will take advantage of or which will apply in the recognised training period (the QWE, I believe it's called).

I think it would continue to be rather difficult to sit SQE1 just off your own self-teaching, so I think practically people are gonna have to do SQE1 prep at an HEI (i.e. a version of the GDL) or use the knowledge from the LLB with a little bit of self-teaching.
0
reply
LGBTvoice
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by J-SP)
If anything, I can see the pool of people getting smaller.

Pass rates will be much lower for the SQE than the LPC, and so by default there will be far fewer NQs knocking around.

Also one advantage is the QWE - not having to commit to two years with one employer will mean more job opportunities arise, even in firms that will stick to the traditional TC model.

The floodgates have been open for quite some time given how many LPC courses are available each year. Thousands of LPC places remain infilled each year - I don’t think this will be much different.
Yeah I understand where you’re coming from. I am a fan of the ability to have more than one employer as well to be fair, it provides more opportunities to prospective solicitors. I think it will be interesting how it works, I worry partly for people who have never studied law before maybe they will be worse hit. But who knows, I’m no expert 🤷🏼*♂️
0
reply
LGBTvoice
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by J-SP)
They always were worse off though having to complete the GDL.

My concern is that prep courses will be focused on passing assessments rather than gaining practical skills and knowledge. There will also be a trainee “purgatory” where people who gain parts of the qualifying process but not all of it, sit for many more than 2 years (eg pass SQE1 + gain 2 years QWE, but continually fail SQE2). It has the danger of creating a system like accounting where there are many who are either over qualified but under experienced or who are under qualified and over experienced...
Yeah I see what you mean totally. Just makes me doubt it even more to be honest 😂 I’m really not keen on the legal profession anymore however. The culture I’ve experienced in particular firms isn’t for me, and the culture of some (not all of course) staff puts me off massively.
0
reply
LGBTvoice
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by J-SP)
It definitely isn’t a career for the majority of people. It’s such a quirky profession really so I’m not surprised to hear it - I didn’t really fit in to it for all the time I worked in it, which is one of the reasons I changed to what I do now.
I understand what you mean. I know I’m still a student and you’ve actually experienced it first hand but there is definitely a stark contrast between expectation and reality.
0
reply
A.ME108
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 months ago
#9
Is there any info on whether you can do the SQE and then the new york bar exam?? Any help would be appreciated as I have no idea where to look
0
reply
Gmaster1980
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 months ago
#10
(Original post by A.ME108)
Is there any info on whether you can do the SQE and then the new york bar exam?? Any help would be appreciated as I have no idea where to look
You can't. Look up the new york bars requirements.
1
reply
A.ME108
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Gmaster1980)
You can't. Look up the new york bars requirements.
So...I would have to do a traditional law degree then instead I guess.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What support do you need with your UCAS application?

I need help researching unis (14)
14.14%
I need help researching courses (8)
8.08%
I need help with filling out the application form (6)
6.06%
I need help with my personal statement (40)
40.4%
I need help with understanding how to make my application stand out (25)
25.25%
I need help with something else (let us know in the thread!) (2)
2.02%
I'm feeling confident about my application and don't need any help at the moment (4)
4.04%

Watched Threads

View All