What the **** (long post) Watch

ANO-NI-MUS
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My parents are diplomats and we keep shifting to a different country every three years or so. I did however stay in England for a few months so I could do my GCSEs in England. I was advised to do international A levels since it will be easier to navigate with them around the world. The international school I went to in England did CIE A levels and the standard is pretty much the same as your AQA and OCR and all that. There were also a fair number of British kids, all of whome selected mostly three or maybe four A levels. Anything more was considered suicide due to the workload. Anyway so my dad gets posted in the consulate in India and I join a international school in India doing CIE a levels as well. Almost exactly similar to the school back in England apart from one huge thing. Doing just three or four A levels is unheard of here. EVERYONE does atleast five and most do six with some doing seven. I'm not sure if it's a university requirement in India or what but yeah. And they're all really good. The most recent batch most graduated with a majority A* and with one or two As. Just for context, the student who performed the worst had A*AAAAB. And they're all hard subjects, not stuff like media or whatever.
So I reached two conclusions
For those doing CIE A levels, it's the Asians who pull up the grade boundaries (though that's hardly surprising lol)
British students, teachers, advisors etc. overreact when saying that the workload wouldn't be manageable beyond three or four A levels.
Or honestly I don't know if their brains are just wired a different way. When I told them most students in England take three, some four A levels, they looked at me so weirdly lol. I felt really dumb.
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RazzzBerries
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I mean, I personally think England is doing the right thing. Whether a brilliant English student with 4 A-Levels or a brilliant Indian student with 7 A-Levels apply to a uni, chances are they'll both be accepted. Obviously it's amazing they're doing well in more, but what's the point going under extra pressure when you reach the same goal anyway?
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ANO-NI-MUS
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(Original post by RazzzBerries)
I mean, I personally think England is doing the right thing. Whether a brilliant English student with 4 A-Levels or a brilliant Indian student with 7 A-Levels apply to a uni, chances are they'll both be accepted. Obviously it's amazing they're doing well in more, but what's the point going under extra pressure when you reach the same goal anyway?
Agreed. Plus I've realised that it's actually university requirements here. And to be honest, it's no secret that Asians in general have always been academically talented (not to say others aren't obviously, just talking about Asians in specific). Honestly it was more of shock for me. In England I did math, biology and chemistry and struggled to maintain A*s all round (as did many others) and over here in India there are ten kids doing math, biology, physics, chemistry and further math, maintaining A*s in all. Indians are smart....they really are lol.
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