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Do employers really care about your Masters degree? watch

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    If you received a Masters degree in the Humanities (Liberal Arts, History, Philosophy, etc.) would that impair you from getting a good job in the UK or elsewhere in Europe? Even if the degree was from a Top School in the United States (think Harvard, Stanford, Yale)?
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    what kind of job are you applying for. if you're looking into technical/engineering jobs, they would possibly be very useful, but apart from teaching jobs, a humanities degree is a mere expensive waste of time im afraid.
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    Lots of managerial positions in retail, restuarants, other companies prefer people with degrees. It shows you are clever enough to get into uni and can work hard enough for a degree. Usually humanities degrees are unrelated to the job, so people will just twist and squeeze for all kinds of reasons why the degree is relevant, i.e. shows I am good with working with people as we studied in groups, shows I'm effective in achieving goals, blablahetc. If it is from a top uni then you can add the fact that you have always been a great/clever/amazing person as shown by your entry into this prestigious place.
    ETA: also, if you did something like history, and you're applying to be a manager at somewhere like an estate agent or something, you could say that what you know about history could be used to better evaluate and market houses from different periods, and gives you more knowledge about architectural history and how it relates to modern day house prices blablablah.
    You just have to use whatever little points you can to make the degree seem relevant. Even philosophy can be used in this way. No degree is ever redundant you're applying for a specialist position i.e. sciences.

    I agree with chris to an extent, humanities do tend to be expensive wastes of time, but a degree will always help in getting a job over other people. Small companies tend to get excited when people from top unis want to join them, too, so double kudos to you.
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    (Original post by YankeeUK2008)
    If you received a Masters degree in the Humanities (Liberal Arts, History, Philosophy, etc.) would that impair you from getting a good job in the UK or elsewhere in Europe? Even if the degree was from a Top School in the United States (think Harvard, Stanford, Yale)?
    I think most "reasonable" employers will not count higher degrees against you but they may not see the higher degrees as adding value to your application.
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    To the OP: no, it definitely won't impair you and is likely to enhance your application. However, if you look at it from a purely utilitarian perspective, it may not do so sufficiently to justify the (no doubt hefty) course fees. The fact that you want to study in the humanities suggests you have good academic reasons for wanting to take the Masters - in which case, go for it, as your enjoyment will make it worth it!

    (Original post by annarchy)
    ETA: also, if you did something like history, and you're applying to be a manager at somewhere like an estate agent or something, you could say that what you know about history could be used to better evaluate and market houses from different periods, and gives you more knowledge about architectural history and how it relates to modern day house prices blablablah.
    No offense, but that is precisely what you do not do. You'd emphasise transferrable skils, not your extensive knowledge of the 1920s housing market because frankly an estate agent will not care. If you can sell houses, you're in.

    (Original post by annarchy)
    I agree with chris to an extent, humanities do tend to be expensive wastes of time, but a degree will always help in getting a job over other people. Small companies tend to get excited when people from top unis want to join them, too, so double kudos to you.
    It depends what you're doing, though. A masters is better than an undergraduate degree in almost every circumstance simply because you've covered an advanced degree. Yes, the subject will matter in certain cases - I suspect by 'good jobs' the OP was thinking more along the lines of investment banking than estate agencies in which case economics is probably the most desirable, but not essential (although the OP might be best posting in the various careers forums). However the majority (60%) of graduate employers do not look for specific degrees. In those cases, your personal performance is the most important - and this is obviously enhanced by a Masters regardless of subject.
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    How on earth would it impair you? If the employer is prejudice, it's probably best not to work for them then!
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    (Original post by Eubacterium)
    How on earth would it impair you? If the employer is prejudice, it's probably best not to work for them then!
    I think the key is to do your research. If the job you want doesn't ask for higher qualifications then don't dwell on them in your application. Concentrate instead on those personal achievements which are relevant. It isnt the degree that impairs you but falling into the trap of writing about your entire history of academic achievement rather than focusing on those aspects relevant to the job.
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    (Original post by YankeeUK2008)
    If you received a Masters degree in the Humanities (Liberal Arts, History, Philosophy, etc.) would that impair you from getting a good job in the UK or elsewhere in Europe? Even if the degree was from a Top School in the United States (think Harvard, Stanford, Yale)?
    just a few things:

    1. subject knowledge - do you want to work in an area that specialises in arts/humanities (such as the museum industry, education, publishing houses etc)? if so, then the subject knowledge acquired through the masters could be very relevant to your job. some jobs out there are very specialist and require a masters degree as a minimum qualification.

    2. skills developed - a masters degree in the arts/humanities can be a lot harder than your undergrad degree, and this allows you to extend your abilities. apart from critical, verbal and written reasoning, you may be involved in hands on archival work for history or english, you may be on a dig in some exotic part of the world for archeology, or you may be educating a group of adult learners about sociocultural differences regarding burial rites in ancient greece. masters degrees offer so many opportunities to hone/extend existing skills and acquire new ones.

    3. fun - there is more to study than simply finding a job. if you love the arts/humanities, want to spend another year at university studying in more depth and enjoy learning, then go for it.

    4. money - some employers offer more money for a masters, just an extra step on the ladder, but its better than nothing. this may not be typically the case, but it does certainly happen. also, some depts. may have a scholarship competition that offers reduced fees or no fees, so if you are working part time, studying part time, and have reduced or no fees, then the money situation can look very different compared to studying full time with no work and no support from the university. just keep your ear to the ground for scholarship and university work opportunities.

    life isn't as simple as some of the posters in this thread have made out, and studying for a masters isn't as simple as saying "no, it's expensive". it's all context sensitive.
 
 
 

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