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    When is it no longer acceptable?

    Would you consider it pathetic if, for example, someone in their early twenties, no longer at Uni, had a flat and car bought for them by their parents? When is it time to wholly stand on your own two feet?
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    I would never move back in with my parents after uni... and I want to pay my own way in life so I wouldn't accept a flat or a car from my parents (crazy I know but I just wouldn't)
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    I personally think as soon as possible after uni. my brothers, 26 and 23, still live at home (to my angst and annoyance), they pay rent and buy there own stuff like cars etc. but financially on your own 2 feet is nothing in comparison to mentally. the youngest brother has never moved out (never went to uni) and is attached . the other just needs courage to move out. i do personally think it is pathetic but it depends on the person and their situation.
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    erm...about 17/18 in my opinion. I stopped getting things bought for me when i was 12 and got my first job. I hate my mum and dad anyway, and they're both too lazy to be able to afford to buy me anything anyway, so they can buy all the tabacco they want
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    I think, basically, it's scrounging when you have the money or can get the money (without, for example, disrupting your studies) yourself, or are asking for far more than you need. So living off your student loan with a bit of money on the side from your parents is ok, but living off your parents' money and sticking your student loan straight into the bank isn't ok, and getting a student loan then asking for it to be tripled because you can't have your usual food from Harrods isn't ok.
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    Bit of a tough one really. I think it's okay to receive gifts (things that you haven't asked for) regardless of your financial situation. But to get money etc from your parents when you are able to support yourself does seem a bit like scrounging. That said, I think it does depend entirely on the situation.
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    (Original post by 0129Hippy)
    erm...about 17/18 in my opinion. I stopped getting things bought for me when i was 12 and got my first job. I hate my mum and dad anyway, and they're both too lazy to be able to afford to buy me anything anyway, so they can buy all the tabacco they want
    You've got money, so why should they buy you stuff? My parents are the same. As soon I started 6th form, I had to buy all my own clothes and other stuff I need/want. (apart from food & drink, which they buy)
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    I think its scrounging as soon as you finish full time education (unless you can't help it, i.e. you have no money so need somewhere to stay, but are looking for a job etc.).
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    Absolutely. Personally, as soon as you go to university, I think you should relinquish all hold on your parents feet and use your own.
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    30.
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    I haven't taken money off my parents since I was 15. Yeh i live here, and i don't pay rent, but I don't get pocket money, and i'm in full time education and if i wanted to go out at the weekend or buy things then i had to pay for them. If your capable of working and aren't then you're scrounging as far as I'm concerned. My brother was 17 before he got a job, he was asking for money of my parents to go out on saturdays and they had to buy him a phone because he needed one and he had no money. And he's still the same, they bail him out
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    i will happily accept money from my parents for as long as they give it to me

    the way i see it is that when they are old and disgusting i will have to look after and care for them and seeing as i'm not keen on old people they owe me one
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    When you earn enough to be able to survive on your own. When I graduate I see myself back at home for a short time until I work out what I want to do but hopefully I will have some sort of job and will be able to contribute. My parents do give me money for rent at uni and for other things too like they have just lent me money to cover new glasses which I will pay back in the summer. They often give me money for train fares and stuff as a nice gesture which is really nice. As a side note, my grandma still sends me 'pocket-money' every month, all the grandchildren get it from her when in full time education at uni so we can use it for treats and not feel guilty about spending money on something like a haircut or theatre tickets.
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    My brother is 23 and has never had to pay for his own clothes. That's scrounging.
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    As soon as you're old enough and have your own job tbh, whether that's before or after uni.
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    My brother is 23 and has never had to pay for his own clothes. That's scrounging.
    My brother is the same and he's 20. I however, have to pay for all my own clothes.
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    I'm a scrounger My student loan is in my ISA while my parents pay my rent and fees- not because I asked them to but because they wanted to and had saved up with a special account to do so. Also all of my spare money goes to running three horses, which is not cheap however much my yard helps me. But I never ask for anything- my parents just feel happier helping me when they can. I won't let it last beyond uni though
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    when you're 45 and still single, living at home and spending every waking hour on tsr
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    When you're 40, work as a teacher, and still live with them just so you can spend all your money on shiny toys.

    Sorry, just a little rant about a teacher I know there. :mad:
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    Definitely by the time you start proper work, so 16-18 or 21/22 if you went to uni. I think fair enough if you're at uni and they pay for your food etc and don't charge you rent during the holidays, but once you've finished you shouldn't be relying on them for things like cars and flats. I lived off my student loan and overdraft at uni, and when I graduated I lived at home for a year rent-free, but I had a job and bought my own clothes, holiday, car, etc, and I was pregnant for some of it so needed to save.
 
 
 
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