Naorlo
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What is an example Beta Radiation Isotope?
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Sinnoh
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Wow, you have to know this?

Beta emission occurs when a nucleus has an excess of protons (for \beta ^+ radiation) or neutrons (for \beta^- radiation). Potassium-40 is a well-known one to decay via \beta^- radiation.

If this is a GCSE question, this distinction is not required.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Naorlo)
What is an example Beta Radiation Isotope?
As sinnoh explained above, there are two possible decays for beta radiation, namely beta(+) and beta(-). In terms of beta(-) a neutron relases a proton and an electron (e-). For beta(+) in turn a proton relases a neutron and a positron (e+)

For beta(-), the Isotope caesium 137 decays into barium 137. Number of protons increases from 55 to 56.

For beta(+), sodium 22 decays into neon 22. Number of protons decreases from 11 to 10.
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