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    And they lived here more than six years, would they be regarded as British or Spanish?

    I thought Spanish but somebody is telling me that if you live in a country for more than six years, you become that countries nationality.

    Is this true?
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    You become eligible for dual nationality.
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    Depends on your choice really, you can apply for citizenship whenever you chose.
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    Thanks for the replies. I was sure they were wrong but they're adamant and won't change their mind or admit they're wrong
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    You become eligible for dual nationality.
    Yeah, you don't automatically "acquire" it, I think you have to take the test the immigrants take (about culture etc.).

    However, whether or not you get dual nationality will sorta depend on the two countries in question. Britain recognises people that have two "origins", so we say they've got dual nationality. However, in America, if you had British parents but were born in America (I think), you have to pick one or the other.
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    it depends on the country. here, as someone said, you can apply for dual nationality - but you still have a spanish nationality...but you don't/can't give up your old nationality.
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    (Original post by kaal1010)
    over a 6 year period you usually lose your tan first and then if your from seville you lose your bull fighting interest and aquire a dislike for sangria
    and then you lose the accent and start eating sunday lunches
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    they are both EU countries and you have the right to live and work in either anywway so isnt it rather a moot point? or is there some huge perk to Spanish citizenship that I dont know about..?
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    wasn't there more pages yesterday
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    it depends on the country. here, as someone said, you can apply for dual nationality - but you still have a spanish nationality...but you don't/can't give up your old nationality.
    Actually, you can surrender your old nationality. It is quite common to do so if there is some sort of stigma attached to your birth nationality. For example, during WWII many germans living abroad surrendered their german nationality in favour of another. Quite often Lichtenstein in fact You have to apply to do it and have another nationality also (you can't be left without nationality), but you definitely can give up Spanish nationality if you want to.
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    (Original post by Llamaaa)
    Actually, you can surrender your old nationality. It is quite common to do so if there is some sort of stigma attached to your birth nationality. For example, during WWII many germans living abroad surrendered their german nationality in favour of another. Quite often Lichtenstein in fact You have to apply to do it and have another nationality also (you can't be left without nationality), but you definitely can give up Spanish nationality if you want to.
    so this means when i move to Australia, if ieventually become a citizen, I will be able to vote in both British and Australian elections? and thus have twice the influence on world affairs as the average person?!
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    (Original post by undercover agent)
    so this means when i move to Australia, if ieventually become a citizen, I will be able to vote in both British and Australian elections? and thus have twice the influence on world affairs as the average person?!

    So long as you remain on the electoral register, yes. I, for example, vote in the elections both in the UK and in Peru. It's all good fun
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    (Original post by Llamaaa)
    Actually, you can surrender your old nationality. It is quite common to do so if there is some sort of stigma attached to your birth nationality. For example, during WWII many germans living abroad surrendered their german nationality in favour of another. Quite often Lichtenstein in fact You have to apply to do it and have another nationality also (you can't be left without nationality), but you definitely can give up Spanish nationality if you want to.
    well...here ou go. i knew you could give up your nationality in other countries, but not in this one
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    well...here ou go. i knew you could give up your nationality in other countries, but not in this one
    Aye, tis governed by international law, so it applies to all nations I was examined on this just a week ago
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    (Original post by Muppety_Kid)
    Britain recognises people that have two "origins", so we say they've got dual nationality. However, in America, if you had British parents but were born in America (I think), you have to pick one or the other.
    I think you get American nationality and British nationality, specifically by origin. My baby cousin when born will get American nationality and British by origin (two British parents, with Irish, French and Spanish passports between them).
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    (Original post by Muppety_Kid)
    However, in America, if you had British parents but were born in America (I think), you have to pick one or the other.
    Not true. My little cousin was born in the US and his parents live there but are British citizens still, and he has dual nationality.

    I like the idea of becoming an Australian citizen and retaining my British nationality however. That's my overall life plan!
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    sorta related to this, ive heard that the spanish govt. does not accept dual nationality. My mum's spanish n i never acquired spanish nationality at birth, im now 18 n looking to get my spanish nationality, but do not want to give up my British one, is that possible?
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    (Original post by georgia)
    Not true. My little cousin was born in the US and his parents live there but are British citizens still, and he has dual nationality.

    I like the idea of becoming an Australian citizen and retaining my British nationality however. That's my overall life plan!
    No, I meant that here in Britain he'd have dual nationality, but if he wanted to live in the States as an American, they'd make him give up British citizenship (i.e. they don't recognise dual nationality).

    I don't know whether we're disagreeing because I'm wrong (likely) or because we've misunderstood each other. I'll look it up
 
 
 
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