Bsc Supply chain management or LLB Law

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BesideThePoint
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#1
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Very different degrees but I'm torn. In terms of employment prospects, value, difficulty, what do you think...? I was leaning more towards supply chain management but some aspects are so technical and require mathematical skills that I really do not possess (though I could learn...) so maybe I would do better at law?

Any thoughts would be appreciated
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Themysticalegg
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I did a degree in Business Management (With a specialism in SCM) and I ended up working in SCM. I don't believe the Maths is that difficult I only did GCSE Maths. Employment prospects are what you make of it in my opinion, I think if you gained relevant work experience it makes finding a graduate role much easier. What course content does the SCM degree have, what university are you considering? I don't think I applied that much knowledge from the degree into the jobs. A lot of it was learning from the job but it was a means to an end to getting that job.
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BesideThePoint
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
I did a degree in Business Management (With a specialism in SCM) and I ended up working in SCM. I don't believe the Maths is that difficult I only did GCSE Maths. Employment prospects are what you make of it in my opinion, I think if you gained relevant work experience it makes finding a graduate role much easier. What course content does the SCM degree have, what university are you considering? I don't think I applied that much knowledge from the degree into the jobs. A lot of it was learning from the job but it was a means to an end to getting that job.
I'm considering logistics & supply chain management from Technological University Dublin. The course content is actually what made me worry about the maths :ashamed2: I was seeing things like financial accounting, spreadsheet modelling, management science etc. Did you encounter anything of that sort in your degree?

Interesting that you don't think you applied much knowledge from the course. This uni does seem very practical with many links to the industry though.. I think there's also a work placement involved so taking advantage of that would probably help like you suggested.
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Perksy121
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I studied International Supply Chain with Shipping Management, the only serious maths I did was in my Logistics module which wasn’t all that challenging tbh. Maths can seem scary but once you get into it’s really not that terrible, I’ve found maths at university much easier than maths at school because it’s actually applied to something practical in the real world.

SCM is very employable too, I chose to go down the Shipping route personally but that’s because that’s my professional background, I actually really enjoyed the SCM side of the degree.
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999tigger
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(Original post by BesideThePoint)
Very different degrees but I'm torn. In terms of employment prospects, value, difficulty, what do you think...? I was leaning more towards supply chain management but some aspects are so technical and require mathematical skills that I really do not possess (though I could learn...) so maybe I would do better at law?

Any thoughts would be appreciated
Why do you think you would fare any better with an LLB? there is a current saturation of the market and it is very competitive. If you are determined and havestrong academics then go to the best uni you can plus get some work experience. If supply chain management has too much maths then find something else.
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Themysticalegg
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I must say I love this course content you're actually going to use a lot of this! (I did a Business degree not straight SCM) After reading through a bunch of the modules the Maths is actually quite easy. Financial Accounting is not too hard on the ol' maths at all. Management Science is fine.The hardest thing Maths wise in that module is literally addition and subtraction for Critical Path Analysis which highlights it's not hard. :rofl: Spreadsheet modelling, Excel does the work for you... I encountered all of these modules and judging by the module contents at TUD it is the same thing. Half of the module contents just has scary words like simulation which makes it sound far more difficult than it actually is. Working in industry will help you put theory into practice and it makes you more interesting at interviews!
(Original post by BesideThePoint)
I'm considering logistics & supply chain management from Technological University Dublin. The course content is actually what made me worry about the maths :ashamed2: I was seeing things like financial accounting, spreadsheet modelling, management science etc. Did you encounter anything of that sort in your degree?

Interesting that you don't think you applied much knowledge from the course. This uni does seem very practical with many links to the industry though.. I think there's also a work placement involved so taking advantage of that would probably help like you suggested.
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 3 years ago
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Themysticalegg
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I couldn't of said it any better, the maths is actually worse at school. :rofl:
(Original post by Perksy121)
I studied International Supply Chain with Shipping Management, the only serious maths I did was in my Logistics module which wasn’t all that challenging tbh. Maths can seem scary but once you get into it’s really not that terrible, I’ve found maths at university much easier than maths at school because it’s actually applied to something practical in the real world.

SCM is very employable too, I chose to go down the Shipping route personally but that’s because that’s my professional background, I actually really enjoyed the SCM side of the degree.
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BesideThePoint
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Ha clearly my trauma from secondary school maths is making me more scared than I need to be Thank you for your replies and the encouragement!




(Original post by Themysticalegg)
I must say I love this course content you're actually going to use a lot of this! (I did a Business degree not straight SCM) After reading through a bunch of the modules the Maths is actually quite easy. Financial Accounting is not too hard on the ol' maths at all. Management Science is fine.The hardest thing Maths wise in that module is literally addition and subtraction for Critical Path Analysis which highlights it's not hard. :rofl: Spreadsheet modelling, Excel does the work for you... I encountered all of these modules and judging by the module contents at TUD it is the same thing. Half of the module contents just has scary words like simulation which makes it sound far more difficult than it actually is. Working in industry will help you put theory into practice and it makes you more interesting at interviews!
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Themysticalegg
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No worries, if you have any other questions feel free to ask.
(Original post by BesideThePoint)
Ha clearly my trauma from secondary school maths is making me more scared than I need to be Thank you for your replies and the encouragement!
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Notoriety
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Both sound tragic.
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Themysticalegg
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I was actually gonna tag you for an insight Papa Noto you read my mind. :rofl:
(Original post by Notoriety)
Both sound tragic.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by BesideThePoint)
Very different degrees but I'm torn. In terms of employment prospects, value, difficulty, what do you think...? I was leaning more towards supply chain management but some aspects are so technical and require mathematical skills that I really do not possess (though I could learn...) so maybe I would do better at law?

Any thoughts would be appreciated
Do you want to manage a supply chain?
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
I was actually gonna tag you for an insight Papa Noto you read my mind. :rofl:
I don't really have a clue how employable an SCM degree is, as I've never heard of it as a degree. I can't really give an insight.

I would always lean towards the more vocational course as they tend to lead more easily into a job. E.g. nursing or teaching or optometry or paramedic science.
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Themysticalegg
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I meant for LLB Law!
(Original post by Notoriety)
I don't really have a clue how employable an SCM degree is, as I've never heard of it as a degree. I can't really give an insight.

I would always lean towards the more vocational course as they tend to lead more easily into a job. E.g. nursing or teaching or optometry or paramedic science.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
I meant for LLB Law!
But what am I comparing it to? A completely unknown entity. Which makes the advice without foundation.

Only do a law degree is you really think you fancy law. It is not a degree for the half-committed. That's business and history.
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Themysticalegg
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If you asked me this question 4 years ago I'd be like what's a supply chain? (I wasn't originally on the SCM path in university, I was doing Business.) :rofl: I just got work experience in one section of SCM and I was like wow this is actually quite interesting, I could make a career out of this!

Back to OP. Depending on the size of the company you may genuinely manage the entire supply chain if it's a small company. (I did my first work experience in a small-medium sized company and SCM consisted of three people who genuinely managed the entire supply chain.) If you're working in a big company realistically the whole SCM function is split into more than 5 sections with an SCM team that could even reach 30+ employees. (Placement year + current exp) Each employee would focus on different areas of SCM.

These areas could include indirect procurement, direct procurement,supplier management, supply chain planning, warehousing and distribution, risk management, tactical supply chain management etc.

(Original post by nulli tertius)
Do you want to manage a supply chain?

To be honest I don't think anyone can really compare SCM to Law, I was just expecting some insight into Law on it's own as you've just given! In my case you aren't wrong about half-committed I only chose Business originally because I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. Ow the truth hurts! :rofl:
(Original post by Notoriety)
But what am I comparing it to? A completely unknown entity. Which makes the advice without foundation.

Only do a law degree is you really think you fancy law. It is not a degree for the half-committed. That's business and history.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
In my case you aren't wrong about half-committed I only chose Business originally because I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. Ow the truth hurts! :rofl:
Doing Business and then finding your future in SCM is one thing; I suspect a degree in SCM is more like a degree in dentistry. Few transferable skills if you don't much like fixing teeth.
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Themysticalegg
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Kind of. With this particular degree from TCD I did a count and only about 80/240 ECTS credits are modules which are only useful for SCM. The other 160/240 are generic Business Management modules like financial accounting, marketing, macroeconomics, HRM etc. I can't speak for other SCM degrees though as I've only looked at the one OP mentioned! So in conclusion OP can still apply for any jobs a generic business student can. However if OP applies for something else they may want to make it clear on their CV that they did modules which are generic business modules as the title of the degree may mislead people into thinking they did an entire degree on SCM!
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Doing Business and then finding your future in SCM is one thing; I suspect a degree in SCM is more like a degree in dentistry. Few transferable skills if you don't much like fixing teeth.
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 3 years ago
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