JzANonM
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Right i know this is a dumb question, butai just wanted to know

If you titrate and acid against a base, does that mean that the acid is in the flask.

Like some qs will word it "NaOH was titrated with Ethanoic Acid"

is titrated another word for added to?
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anonymoussse
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NaOH is in the conical flask in that question. it depends on the phrasing of the question. if it's "X is titrated with...." X goes in the flask
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JzANonM
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(Original post by anonymoussse)
NaOH is in the conical flask in that question. it depends on the phrasing of the question. if it's "X is titrated with...." X goes in the flask
so if its "NaOH is titrated against Ethanoic Acid" would it still be NaOH?
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anonymoussse
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yeah i think so! that's what my teacher told me.
But i don't think it matters which one goes where, it says it in the cgp.
apparently, usually acids go in the burette.
(Original post by JzANonM)
so if its "NaOH is titrated against Ethanoic Acid" would it still be NaOH?
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JzANonM
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(Original post by anonymoussse)
yeah i think so! that's what my teacher told me.
But i don't think it matters which one goes where, it says it in the cgp.
apparently, usually acids go in the burette.
thanks m8 for your help😁 apologies for the dumb question 😂😁
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anonymoussse
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lots of ppl have asked the same thing! it's actually a really good question u need to actually ask all of ur "dumb" questions to ur teachers and other people. it's going to take a lot of courage because u think you'll look stupid but those unasked questions will actually cost you so many marks and it's not worth it!

plus, youre confused for a REASON. it's never because you're stupid. also, you'll find that the rest of the class agrees with u so u dont even look stupid

however, some questions will actually make u look like a stupid FOOL lol i won't lie to u, but u NEED to ask ur teacher anyway! that's what having courage is (unless it's something sooo trivial and that u can find out for urself.)
(Original post by JzANonM)
thanks m8 for your help😁 apologies for the dumb question 😂😁
Last edited by anonymoussse; 1 year ago
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David Tan
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(Original post by JzANonM)
Right i know this is a dumb question, butai just wanted to know

If you titrate and acid against a base, does that mean that the acid is in the flask.

Like some qs will word it "NaOH was titrated with Ethanoic Acid"

is titrated another word for added to?
1) If X is titrated against Y, it usually means that Y is the titrant (placed in burette) and X is the analyte. However, it is not always the case. Just read the instructions carefully.

2) The example that you stated is one of a weak acid vs strong base titration, which means that there would be a buffer region. If the weak acid is the analyte, then maximum buffering capacity volume = 0.5 x equivalence volume. If the weak acid is the titrant, then maximum buffering capacity volume = 2 x equivalence volume.

Although the acid is typically placed in the burette, in this example the weak acid is preferably placed in the conical flask. Otherwise, the volume required to achieve maximum buffering capacity may exceed the volume of the burette. This would contribute to a greater titrant reading error.

Hope it helps. Cheers.
Last edited by David Tan; 1 year ago
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JzANonM
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(Original post by David Tan)
1) If X is titrated against Y, it usually means that Y is the titrant (placed in burette) and X is the analyte. However, it is not always the case. Just read the instructions carefully.

2) The example that you stated is one of a weak acid vs strong base titration, which means that there would be a buffer region. If the weak acid is the analyte, then maximum buffering capacity volume = 0.5 x equivalence volume. If the weak acid is the titrant, then maximum buffering capacity volume = 2 x equivalence volume.

Although the acid is typically placed in the burette, in this example the weak acid is preferably placed in the conical flask. Otherwise, the volume required to achieve maximum buffering capacity may exceed the volume of the burette. This would contribute to a greater titrant reading error.

Hope it helps. Cheers.
Absolute Legend, thank u so much 🙏
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