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How can I power on a computer over a network? watch

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    I'm pretty sure there is an option for it in the bios, but I've no clue how to actually set it up. Ideally I'd like to be able to power on the computer from anywhere, through the internet, onto my home network and through my router, coruse I might have to forward a few ports and what not. Can anyone get me started?
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    You want to boot a computer over the Internet? For that, you need port forwarding, a static IP address, and incredible technical expertise... get a laptop?

    Quick fix: set up a Linux/UNIX box and forward port 23 to the internal IP address of that box. Then you can Telnet into it from pretty much anywhere. The only drawback concerning that, of course, is that you're basically just using an ASCII terminal, so no graphical environments.

    What you you actually want it for, anyway? Just get a subnotebook or something.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    You want to boot a computer over the Internet? For that, you need port forwarding, a static IP address, and incredible technical expertise... get a laptop?

    Quick fix: set up a Linux/UNIX box and forward port 23 to the internal IP address of that box. Then you can Telnet into it from pretty much anywhere. The only drawback concerning that, of course, is that you're basically just using an ASCII terminal, so no graphical environments.

    What you you actually want it for, anyway? Just get a subnotebook or something.
    You don't really need a static ip address, there are fairly simple solutions for that end. I just wanted to know what you actually use to power it on.

    And why am I doing it? Because I can mainly. Wanted something to do, thought I'd set up an ftp server on it, along with keeping an eye on my parents while I'm at university.
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    Webcam ?

    If there's a solution for static IP addresses, then what is it? I've a Reno setup at home that I've done so I can access it from any machine; my only problem is that it's a non-static IP address, so I can't remember the address to access the machine.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Webcam ?

    If there's a solution for static IP addresses, then what is it? I've a Reno setup at home that I've done so I can access it from any machine; my only problem is that it's a non-static IP address, so I can't remember the address to access the machine.
    I've used stuff like no-ip before on servers, of course there is the inconvenience of having to run a program on your server to keep updating the ip. Worked like a treat last time I used it. I suppose this is only a minor point, since if I placed the server well it's unlikely it'll get turned off, and it can power back up after a cut.
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    So with that, I can assign a new IP address, that'll be redirected to the current address at home?
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    What do you mean by assign a new ip address? I've always used it for when my ip address changes via ISP voodoo.
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    What I mean is, can I use that so I only have to learn one IP address, instead of a new one every day.
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    (Original post by steelmole)
    I'm pretty sure there is an option for it in the bios, but I've no clue how to actually set it up. Ideally I'd like to be able to power on the computer from anywhere, through the internet, onto my home network and through my router, coruse I might have to forward a few ports and what not. Can anyone get me started?
    First thing's first, you need to enable Wake-On-LAN in your motherboard BIOS. Then, set up port forwarding for your PC - typically I think it's port 9. Next, you'll need to find the MAC address of the ethernet card you'll be sending to.

    Now, it gets a little bit more complicated. Unless you are happy writing a script to create and send a packet (in Python or Perl, say) you'll need to use one of the free services online. If you google 'Wake on LAN', I'm sure you can find one.

    If you want to write your own, then you need to know what sort of packet you're going to be sending. The so-called "Magic Packet" which the Motherboard is waiting for consists of 6 bytes of ones (i.e. FF FF FF FF FF FF) followed by 16 repetitions of the remote machine's MAC address. Then use sockets to send it off over port 9. I've never done this, mind, so I don't know how easy it will be.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    What I mean is, can I use that so I only have to learn one IP address, instead of a new one every day.
    If your router supports one of the free dynamic DNS services, then you can learn a domain (my.router.com) and have the DNS server update it to your IP address.
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    (Original post by DoMakeSayThink)
    First thing's first, you need to enable Wake-On-LAN in your motherboard BIOS. Then, set up port forwarding for your PC - typically I think it's port 9. Next, you'll need to find the MAC address of the ethernet card you'll be sending to.

    Now, it gets a little bit more complicated. Unless you are happy writing a script to create and send a packet (in Python or Perl, say) you'll need to use one of the free services online. If you google 'Wake on LAN', I'm sure you can find one.

    If you want to write your own, then you need to know what sort of packet you're going to be sending. The so-called "Magic Packet" which the Motherboard is waiting for consists of 6 bytes of ones (i.e. FF FF FF FF FF FF) followed by 16 repetitions of the remote machine's MAC address. Then use sockets to send it off over port 9. I've never done this, mind, so I don't know how easy it will be.
    I was about to say the same. Look at wiki article on this. They have quite a few useful incl scripts. Look under Wake-on-LAN programs
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    Thankyou! That's what I was getting at, I didn't know what kind of packet needed to be sent etc. Doesn't help that I couldn't remember it was called wake on lan. We'll see how things go.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    What I mean is, can I use that so I only have to learn one IP address, instead of a new one every day.
    www.dyndns.org - learn a web address rather than an IP. Netgear routers support this as standard. If you've got a suitable router you run the client on your machine for it to report you IP back to them.
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    I've got a Netgear router. This means, I suppose, that I'd have to buy a domain name?
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    I've got a Netgear router. This means, I suppose, that I'd have to buy a domain name?
    No, DynDNS give you a choice of subdomains. The ones I use end in .ath.cx
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    If it's a Netgear you'll most likely have to change the subnet mask, as you can't forward a .255 address on them. Not sure if you can do wake-on-LAN as a unicast, I'm fairly sure it's designed to be broadcast packets but who knows it might work.

    I don't think the port (or the protocol for that matter, doesn't have to be TCP) actually matters on WOL, but I could be wrong.
 
 
 
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