bubble123987
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I'm going into year 12 next year but I want to be sure about what I want to do at uni, and I'm leaning towards chemical engineering. I'm doing maths, further maths physics and chemistry for A level and I feel like it would be a suitable career path to take, but I don't actually know what it entails. What sort of skills should a chemical engineer have? And what is the working environment like? (do you have to be in industry all the time or is it possible to work in an office too?)
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Newcastle University Student Ambassador
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Hi bubble123987,

I'm just coming to the end of an MEng in Chemical Engineering at Newcastle so I should be able to answer some of your questions. Your A-Levels have set you up perfectly for studying chemical engineering at uni so I wouldn't worry about those. In terms of skills you'll obviously develop a good understanding of engineering principles and improve your maths skills from A-level, but you'll also develop a lot more wide ranging skills like your team work and team leadership skills from group projects, time management from completing projects alongside lectures etc., analytical skills, IT skills from using advanced engineering software and coding alongside things like business knowledge from economics modules and communication skills again from group projects but also from completing presentations (at the following link you can look at every module we teach at Newcastle and the key skills you'll learn from each https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails).

Regarding the work environment, there's a huge variety of roles available so that you can spend as much or as little time in the field as you want (i.e. a deployed area engineer responsible for the upkeep of a plant would be on site most of the week whereas a design engineer working for a consultant would spend most of their time in the office). A lot of people with chemical engineering jobs also go into jobs like finance, IT/ coding or project management due to the transferable skills you'll learn throughout the degree.

If you've got any more questions (about chemical engineering, chemical engineering at Newcastle or Newcastle in general) please feel free to either reply here or send me a private message and I'll get back to you as soon as possible!

Good luck with whatever you choose,
Matthew
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Sheperd23
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(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi bubble123987,

I'm just coming to the end of an MEng in Chemical Engineering at Newcastle so I should be able to answer some of your questions. Your A-Levels have set you up perfectly for studying chemical engineering at uni so I wouldn't worry about those. In terms of skills you'll obviously develop a good understanding of engineering principles and improve your maths skills from A-level, but you'll also develop a lot more wide ranging skills like your team work and team leadership skills from group projects, time management from completing projects alongside lectures etc., analytical skills, IT skills from using advanced engineering software and coding alongside things like business knowledge from economics modules and communication skills again from group projects but also from completing presentations (at the following link you can look at every module we teach at Newcastle and the key skills you'll learn from each https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails).

Regarding the work environment, there's a huge variety of roles available so that you can spend as much or as little time in the field as you want (i.e. a deployed area engineer responsible for the upkeep of a plant would be on site most of the week whereas a design engineer working for a consultant would spend most of their time in the office). A lot of people with chemical engineering jobs also go into jobs like finance, IT/ coding or project management due to the transferable skills you'll learn throughout the degree.

If you've got any more questions (about chemical engineering, chemical engineering at Newcastle or Newcastle in general) please feel free to either reply here or send me a private message and I'll get back to you as soon as possible!

Good luck with whatever you choose,
Matthew
how does the maths compare to FM a level? is it much harder, or focuses more on mechanics for example?
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avacados1
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(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi bubble123987,

I'm just coming to the end of an MEng in Chemical Engineering at Newcastle so I should be able to answer some of your questions. Your A-Levels have set you up perfectly for studying chemical engineering at uni so I wouldn't worry about those. In terms of skills you'll obviously develop a good understanding of engineering principles and improve your maths skills from A-level, but you'll also develop a lot more wide ranging skills like your team work and team leadership skills from group projects, time management from completing projects alongside lectures etc., analytical skills, IT skills from using advanced engineering software and coding alongside things like business knowledge from economics modules and communication skills again from group projects but also from completing presentations (at the following link you can look at every module we teach at Newcastle and the key skills you'll learn from each https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails).

Regarding the work environment, there's a huge variety of roles available so that you can spend as much or as little time in the field as you want (i.e. a deployed area engineer responsible for the upkeep of a plant would be on site most of the week whereas a design engineer working for a consultant would spend most of their time in the office). A lot of people with chemical engineering jobs also go into jobs like finance, IT/ coding or project management due to the transferable skills you'll learn throughout the degree.

If you've got any more questions (about chemical engineering, chemical engineering at Newcastle or Newcastle in general) please feel free to either reply here or send me a private message and I'll get back to you as soon as possible!

Good luck with whatever you choose,
Matthew
I have no computer knowledge whatsoever but i really want to do an online course over the holidays. Do you what coding languages I could do that would be most useful before applying for chem eng ? Sorry if that sounds dumb but I just don’t know any thing to do with computing 🙁
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UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences
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Hey Aavacados1234

I've just finished my third year of Chem Eng at Birmingham, I got firsts all three years and did absolutely no computing/programming prep before uni, the uni knows you won't have any experience with coding and will teach you everything from the very beginning!

Focus on writing a great personal statement and getting good A levels, you don't need to be worrying about learning to code before uni, the only other thing I'd recommend is going to open days to find out more about the degree and what it entails!

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergr...ays/index.aspx


let me know if you have any more questions!


Thanks
Harry
(Original post by avacados1234)
I have no computer knowledge whatsoever but i really want to do an online course over the holidays. Do you what coding languages I could do that would be most useful before applying for chem eng ? Sorry if that sounds dumb but I just don’t know any thing to do with computing 🙁
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avacados1
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(Original post by UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences)
Hey Aavacados1234

I've just finished my third year of Chem Eng at Birmingham, I got firsts all three years and did absolutely no computing/programming prep before uni, the uni knows you won't have any experience with coding and will teach you everything from the very beginning!

Focus on writing a great personal statement and getting good A levels, you don't need to be worrying about learning to code before uni, the only other thing I'd recommend is going to open days to find out more about the degree and what it entails!

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergr...ays/index.aspx


let me know if you have any more questions!


Thanks
Harry
Thanks for replying. It’s not that I’m forcing myself to get ahead , I’m just interested in it because I’m taking a gap year and so won’t be applying this year anyways.
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UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences
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In that case avacados, I'd reccomend learning python.

At university we use MATLAB, it's not open source so you'd need a licence and that can be pricey, MATLAB is also specifically a scientific programming language and not that often used in industry, python is pretty similar in syntax wise, but you can do ALOT more with it and it's free and a very marketable skill.

So that'd be my advice!

thanks Harry
(Original post by avacados1234)
Thanks for replying. It’s not that I’m forcing myself to get ahead , I’m just interested in it because I’m taking a gap year and so won’t be applying this year anyways.
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yoxox
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Hi Harry, I'm a chemical engineering applicant and offer holding, currently waiting for my A-level results. I did A-level Biology, chemistry and maths. How hard is chemical engineering, is it manageable for someone who didn't take A-level physics? I did do mechanics in maths. Is the physics in Chem Eng, things associated with physical chemical like Thermodynamics, kinetics etc?
(Original post by UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences)
Hey Aavacados1234

I've just finished my third year of Chem Eng at Birmingham, I got firsts all three years and did absolutely no computing/programming prep before uni, the uni knows you won't have any experience with coding and will teach you everything from the very beginning!

Focus on writing a great personal statement and getting good A levels, you don't need to be worrying about learning to code before uni, the only other thing I'd recommend is going to open days to find out more about the degree and what it entails!

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergr...ays/index.aspx


let me know if you have any more questions!


Thanks
Harry
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Newcastle University Student Ambassador
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Hi yoxox,

I am a recent graduate of MEng Chemical Engineering at Newcastle University and I did not study A-Level Physics and I found it manageable. I must admit the degree can be a tad bit tricky as Physics do come into play a bit, however, everything you learn is all relatively new material so please do not worry too much! Most physic-related material do tend to fall under engineering mathematics, so as long as you have your mathematical knowledge, you should be fine especially since you have mentioned you do mechanics. The degree usually goes through everything again for revision, just in case there those like ourselves who have not studied A-Level Physics. There are modules such as Thermodynamics and kinetics - but again, everything you learn is all new and they teach from the beginning. But you can start ahead and learn these stuff if you so wish. I went on my uni's website to see what modules there are and so I could prep myself for the year. Here is the link if you wish to have a look:

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails

I hope this has helped!
Shaki

(Original post by yoxox)
Hi Harry, I'm a chemical engineering applicant and offer holding, currently waiting for my A-level results. I did A-level Biology, chemistry and maths. How hard is chemical engineering, is it manageable for someone who didn't take A-level physics? I did do mechanics in maths. Is the physics in Chem Eng, things associated with physical chemical like Thermodynamics, kinetics etc?
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UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences
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Yeah i agree with Shaki, I have lots of friends who didn't do physics at A level and it never held them back, knowledge of biology is in my opinion as usual as physics for some modules. So whilst you might find some transport phenomena stuff hard, you'll be better equipped for the bio chemical engineering stuff! It all balances out and I really wouldn't worry.

Thanks
Harry
(Original post by yoxox)
Hi Harry, I'm a chemical engineering applicant and offer holding, currently waiting for my A-level results. I did A-level Biology, chemistry and maths. How hard is chemical engineering, is it manageable for someone who didn't take A-level physics? I did do mechanics in maths. Is the physics in Chem Eng, things associated with physical chemical like Thermodynamics, kinetics etc?
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yoxox
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Thank you so much, this is very helpful!
(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi yoxox,

I am a recent graduate of MEng Chemical Engineering at Newcastle University and I did not study A-Level Physics and I found it manageable. I must admit the degree can be a tad bit tricky as Physics do come into play a bit, however, everything you learn is all relatively new material so please do not worry too much! Most physic-related material do tend to fall under engineering mathematics, so as long as you have your mathematical knowledge, you should be fine especially since you have mentioned you do mechanics. The degree usually goes through everything again for revision, just in case there those like ourselves who have not studied A-Level Physics. There are modules such as Thermodynamics and kinetics - but again, everything you learn is all new and they teach from the beginning. But you can start ahead and learn these stuff if you so wish. I went on my uni's website to see what modules there are and so I could prep myself for the year. Here is the link if you wish to have a look:

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails

I hope this has helped!
Shaki
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yoxox
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Thank you so much
(Original post by UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences)
Yeah i agree with Shaki, I have lots of friends who didn't do physics at A level and it never held them back, knowledge of biology is in my opinion as usual as physics for some modules. So whilst you might find some transport phenomena stuff hard, you'll be better equipped for the bio chemical engineering stuff! It all balances out and I really wouldn't worry.

Thanks
Harry
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Cpj16
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(Original post by bubble123987)
I'm going into year 12 next year but I want to be sure about what I want to do at uni, and I'm leaning towards chemical engineering. I'm doing maths, further maths physics and chemistry for A level and I feel like it would be a suitable career path to take, but I don't actually know what it entails. What sort of skills should a chemical engineer have? And what is the working environment like? (do you have to be in industry all the time or is it possible to work in an office too?)
hi!
Chem eng is for some people and it isn't for others.

If I were you, go on youtube and look at online lectures. I am in 3rd year rn and I am not liking it
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avacados1
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(Original post by Cpj16)
hi!
Chem eng is for some people and it isn't for others.

If I were you, go on youtube and look at online lectures. I am in 3rd year rn and I am not liking it
Why are you not liking it if u don’t mind me asking ?
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University of Bradford
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(Original post by bubble123987)
I'm going into year 12 next year but I want to be sure about what I want to do at uni, and I'm leaning towards chemical engineering. I'm doing maths, further maths physics and chemistry for A level and I feel like it would be a suitable career path to take, but I don't actually know what it entails. What sort of skills should a chemical engineer have? And what is the working environment like? (do you have to be in industry all the time or is it possible to work in an office too?)
Hi

It's great that you're thinking about what you want to study

I thought you might like to hear a student’s perspective on studying Chemical Engineering :thumbsup:

“After I’d done my GCSEs, I decided I’d like to do something involving Maths or Chemistry. I chose Chemical Engineering because it involves a bit of everything and I don’t want to be limited at this stage...”

“Doing a placement shows you how what you’re learning translates into the real world and gives you a better understanding of why you’re studying what you’re studying. It makes you stand out to employers once you graduate”

Benjamin has some more great advice which you can check out here: https://bit.ly/2SUPWcB

Feel free to ask any questions :yy:

Becky
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