Are people from the Republic of Ireland Irish or British? Watch

Obolinda
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#21
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#21
well ni is not in Britain, but idk
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L i b
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#22
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Not everyone living in Canada is a Canadian. Not everyone living in Northern Ireland (or any other part of the UK) is British. Ultimately it's a question of legal citizenship (and there are plenty of people there who hold Irish or other citizenships) and the separate question of identity, in which case people can call themselves whatever they want.

(Original post by Obolinda)
well ni is not in Britain, but idk
Northern Ireland isn't in Great Britain. In general, 'Britain' alone is just shorthand for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, so in that sense it is.

We're not terribly consistent about this, but that's the most common usages.
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gjd800
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#23
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The can be either or both.
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Obolinda
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#24
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Thanks
(Original post by L i b)
Not everyone living in Canada is a Canadian. Not everyone living in Northern Ireland (or any other part of the UK) is British. Ultimately it's a question of legal citizenship (and there are plenty of people there who hold Irish or other citizenships) and the separate question of identity, in which case people can call themselves whatever they want.


Northern Ireland isn't in Great Britain. In general, 'Britain' alone is just shorthand for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, so in that sense it is.

We're not terribly consistent about this, but that's the most common usages.
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londonmyst
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#25
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#25
They are all British citizens, many also hold Irish nationality.
It depends on individual preferences; some identify as British, others as Northern Irish, some Irish.
I know a few who describe themselves as all three.
Last edited by londonmyst; 1 week ago
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naem071
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#26
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Under the Good Friday Agreement, citizens born in Northern Ireland are in a unique position in that they can choose either British or Irish citizenship and have the right to hold both if they wish to do so. This is obviously where the sectarian divide plays a role in forming national identity, I'll use the example of two of my friends. One of them is a Catholic from Derry, he holds Irish citizenship and doesn't identify as a British citizen as such, a typical pattern in nationalist areas. The other is a Protestant from Co. Antrim and he holds British citizenship only, his area is overwhelmingly loyalist, in fact there's a saying that 'we're more British than the British!'.
Last edited by naem071; 1 week ago
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BlueIndigoViolet
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#27
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many people in NI have a strong affinity to the rest of the UK, so may identify as British, while others are proud to be called Irish or even both
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