TSRMedics™ BASICS 1 Overview of Specialties - What are they and common misconceptions

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ecolier
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Welcome to TSRMedics™BASICS
TSRMedics™BASICS is the section for discussion of basic (basic to us anyway!) information about different roles and information in the medical, nursing and allied health professions.

TSRMedics™BASICS 1 Overview of Medical Specialties
What are medical specialties?
Different roles for doctors that you will work and train in.

What are sub-specialties?
Once you are in the specialty, there are sub-specialties that you can join. e.g. Spinal surgery in Neurosurgery, Paediatric Cardiology in Paediatrics.

What specialties are there?
There are many - a lot can be classified into Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry. The rest are more "standalone". There will be a list further down.

How does a junior doctor join a specialty?
All UK medical graduates have to complete 2 years of Foundation Training (see seperate article) prior to joining a specialty.

Depending on the specialty, a junior doctor may have to do a 2-3 year Core Specialty Training (e.g. Core Surgical Training, Core Psychiatry Training, Internal Medicine Training) and then apply to the specialty.

Some specialties do not have this Core period, and doctors enter into the specialty training straight after Foundation Year 2. These are called "run through" specialties. e.g. Obs and Gynae.

How long does it take to train in a specialty?
It depends on the specialty.

General Practice takes 3 years after Foundation Year 2; total 5 years after medical school.

Most hospital-based specialties take 6-8 years after Foundation Year 2; total 8-10 years after medical school.

Do you get paid during training?
Yes. You get paid for working from the August that you graduate. Your salary will go up after Foundation Year 1, Foundation Year 2, and Core / Specialty Training Year 2. There are plans to introduce another step-up in pay after Specialty Training Year 6.

2018/19 pay:
FY1 - £27,146 / year
FY2 - £31,422 / year
CT1 / CT2 - £37,191 / year
ST3 - ST8 - £47,132 / year
(* excluding on-call supplements)

2019/20 pay:
FY1 - £27,689 / year
FY2 - £32,050 / year
CT1 / CT2 - £37,935 / year
ST3 - ST8 - £48,075 / year
(* excluding on-call supplements)

Current (2020/21) pay:
FY1 - £28.243 / year
FY2 - £32,691 / year
CT1 / CT2 - £38,693 / year
ST3 - ST8 - £49,036 / year
(* excluding on-call supplements)

So, what are the specialties at CT1 / ST1 level?
Here goes (list will be updated with information and corrected with time)

ACCS (Acute Care Common Stem)
https://www.rcoa.ac.uk/accs

ACCS is a three year training programme that normally follows Foundation Year 2. It is the only Core training programme for trainees wishing to enter Higher specialty training in Emergency Medicine and is an alternative Core training programme for trainees wishing to enter Higher specialty training in Anaesthesia and any of the Specialties listed on the JRCPTB website. The first two years are spent rotating through Emergency Medicine (EM), Acute Internal Medicine, Anaesthetics and Intensive Care Medicine (ICM). The third year is spent in training that will ensure the trainee meets the minimum requirements for entry into Higher specialty training in their parent specialty (EM, JRCPTB Specialty, Anaesthetics and also ICM). The components of training in ACCS are:

  • 1 year Emergency Medicine + Acute Internal Medicine (usually 6 months each)
  • 1 year Anaesthesia + Intensive Care Medicine (usually 6 months each)

ACCS anaesthetics / core anaesthetics training
ACCS CT1 anaesthetics - https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk...CCS-%20CT1.pdf
CT1 anaesthetics - https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk...-%20CT1%20.pdf

The core level is normally two years in duration and consists of the introduction to anaesthetia and core anaesthesia. The introduction to anaesthesia is usually completed within the first six months and includes the initial assessment of competence milestone. The remainder of the two years is dedicated towards completing core anaesthesia and passing the Primary FRCA examination. Trainees who enter via the ACCS route complete the core level in three years. Two of the years are in ACCS and the third year is just anaesthesia.

Cardiothoracic surgery
http://www.wessexdeanery.nhs.uk/pdf/...nt%20final.pdf

Example of CTS training programme at Severn Deanery: http://surgery.severndeanery.nhs.uk/...racic-surgery/

Clinical Radiology
https://www.rcr.ac.uk/clinical-radio...ty-recruitment
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...nd-development

Training for clinical radiology is a run-through programme that takes five years to complete stages ST1-5. There is a further year, ST6 for those trainees wishing to specialise in interventional radiology. Unlike some other medical specialties, there is no competitive application process at ST3.

It is possible to apply for specialty training directly from foundation training, although because of the competitive nature of the specialty, some previous experience of radiology clinical practice and/or research is likely to be useful. Some applicants have undertaken training in another medical specialty before applying for radiology.

The training involves three years of general radiology training followed by two years of special interest training. Years one to three includes training in each radiology sub-specialty.

During training you will also take examinations leading to Fellowship of the Royal College of Radiologists (FRCR). During your ST1-5/6 training you will be employed as a specialist registrar. At the end of this training you will receive a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) and will be eligible to be on the GMC Specialist Register. You can then apply for consultant posts.

Community Sexual and Reproductive Health
https://www.fsrh.org/education-and-training/specialty/
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...ductive-health

Training in community sexual and reproductive healthcare (CSRH) is a run-through training from ST1-6. Once you have been accepted at ST1, you will not need to apply again. Training normally lasts six years.

You will need to pass part 1 exams of the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health (MFSRH) by the end of ST2. Part 2 of the MFSRH exams must be passed by the end of ST5 and before entering ST6.

Core Psychiatry Training
https://www.nwpgmd.nhs.uk/ct1_psy_recruit_overview
https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/docs/defau...rsn=881b63ca_2

Psychiatry trainees have to successfully complete the three-year Core Psychiatry Training programme before applying in open competition for a place in a programme leading to a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) in one of the six psychiatry specialties.

Trainees who were appointed to Psychiatry Specialty Training prior to August 2008 were generally appointed to ‘run-through’ training posts.

The six psychiatry specialties are Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Forensic Psychiatry, General Psychiatry, Old Age Psychiatry, the Psychiatry of Learning Disability and Medical Psychotherapy.

In addition, there are two sub- specialties of General Psychiatry; Substance Misuse Psychiatry and Rehabilitation Psychiatry and Liaison Psychiatry is a sub-specialty of both General Psychiatry and Old Age Psychiatry.

Core Surgical Training

General Practice Specialty Training

Histopathology

Internal Medicine Training

Neurosurgery

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Ophthalmology

Oral and Maxillofacial surgery

Paediatrics

Public Health Medicine
More specialties coming soon. Please request them in the thread below if you are interested.

What are the common misconceptions regarding medical specialties?
Psychiatry is a medical specialty (you have to hold a medical degree to do it); psychology is not.
Neurology is a medical specialty (you have to hold a medical degree to do it); neuroscience is not.

References
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/doctors/roles-doctors
https://www.st3recruitment.org.uk/
https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/education-careers/careers-paediatrics
https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media/Employers/Documents/Pay-and-Conditions-Circular-MD-32018-270918.pdf
Last edited by ecolier; 2 months ago
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ecolier
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The post is being updated...
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Helenia
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You can do Core Anaesthetics at CT1, doesn't have to be done via ACCS.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Helenia)
You can do Core Anaesthetics at CT1, doesn't have to be done via ACCS.
Will update
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Democracy
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(Original post by ecolier)
How long does it take to train in a specialty?
It depends on the specialty.

General Practice takes 3 years after Foundation Year 2; total 5 years after medical school.

Most hospital-based specialties take 6-8 years after Foundation Year 2; total 8-10 years after medical school.
Radiology and histopathology are both five year run throughs.

Is this going to be added onto to the TSR Medicine wiki?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Democracy)
Radiology and histopathology are both five year run throughs.

Is this going to be added onto to the TSR Medicine wiki?
Cool, will update.

That is not my intention as this format allows discussion. Also who knows that TSR Medicine wiki exists anyway?
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Democracy
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(Original post by ecolier)
Cool, will update.

That is not my intention as this format allows discussion. Also who knows that TSR Medicine wiki exists anyway?
More people might if it were better promoted and editable A lot of time and effort went into it.

Is this going to be similar to a megathread...?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Democracy)
More people might if it were better promoted and editable A lot of time and effort went into it.

Is this going to be similar to a megathread...?
Probably not, it may consist of a few threads. It's not just basic medical specialty information but also discussion of scientific topics and other things .

Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6021440
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Democracy
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(Original post by ecolier)
Probably not, it may consist of a few threads. It's not just basic medical specialty information but also discussion of scientific topics and other things .

Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6021440
I have Though BASICS makes it sound all PHEM-y
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ecolier
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I have Though BASICS makes it sound all PHEM-y
:lol: It's only for the "basic" information. The things that most people are actually going to be interested in is going to be in "topics"
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jzdzm
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Is this the place to ask related questions? I'm interested to know what Public Health doctors do, and why is it so competitive to become one?
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ecolier
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(Original post by jzdzm)
Is this the place to ask related questions? I'm interested to know what Public Health doctors do, and why is it so competitive to become one?
Yes! I will be updating the first post with more information but you have asked a very good question.

Read https://www.fph.org.uk/training-care...public-health/ and https://www.fph.org.uk/training-care...alty-training/

There are many reasons why Public Health Medicine specialty training is super competitive, one of them is because it allows non-medical doctors to apply as well as medics. It usually attracts very well-qualified non-medics (e.g. Midwife with PhD in a Public Health or something similar).

I did 4 months as an FY2 in Public Health, it was amazing (not as good as neurology, obviously :giggle: )
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Beska
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(Original post by ecolier)
Also who knows that TSR Medicine wiki exists anyway?
Since it was tucked away, nearly nobody. However provides enough information to answer the vast majority of questions asked on this forum and my and colleagues spent a vast amount of time creating and updating it over the years..!
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Beska)
Since it was tucked away, nearly nobody. However provides enough information to answer the vast majority of questions asked on this forum and my and colleagues spent a vast amount of time creating and updating it over the years..!
It is where I started all my research, so thank you very much!
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ecolier
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Don't worry I haven't forgotten about this. I have updated a few bits (including the first few specialties and the latest wages!!) for now
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Beska)
Since it was tucked away, nearly nobody. However provides enough information to answer the vast majority of questions asked on this forum and my and colleagues spent a vast amount of time creating and updating it over the years..!
I thought I was relatively well versed in the nooks and crannies of TSR and I must admit I'd not heard of it. Couldn't it be promoted again - the TSR medics are the stand-out part of the website, and it seems a terrible shame that such a valuable resource should be hidden away.
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Angury
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(Original post by ecolier)
Core Psychiatry Training
https://www.nwpgmd.nhs.uk/ct1_psy_recruit_overview
https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/docs/defau...rsn=881b63ca_2

Psychiatry trainees have to successfully complete the three-year Core Psychiatry Training programme before applying in open competition for a place in a programme leading to a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) in one of the six psychiatry specialties.

Trainees who were appointed to Psychiatry Specialty Training prior to August 2008 were generally appointed to ‘run-through’ training posts.

The six psychiatry specialties are Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Forensic Psychiatry, General Psychiatry, Old Age Psychiatry, the Psychiatry of Learning Disability and Medical Psychotherapy.

In addition, there are two sub- specialties of General Psychiatry; Substance Misuse Psychiatry and Rehabilitation Psychiatry and Liaison Psychiatry is a sub-specialty of both General Psychiatry and Old Age Psychiatry.
:woo:

That is my contribution.

(Also great idea and happy to answer questions re Psychiatry training as it seems to be becoming quite popular amongst medical applicants).
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Beska
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I thought I was relatively well versed in the nooks and crannies of TSR and I must admit I'd not heard of it. Couldn't it be promoted again - the TSR medics are the stand-out part of the website, and it seems a terrible shame that such a valuable resource should be hidden away.
I agree.
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millie.123
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Could you give more info on obsterics and gynaecology? Thank you so much for making this thread
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ecolier
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(Original post by millie.123)
Could you give more info on obsterics and gynaecology? Thank you so much for making this thread

UK training in O&G requires a minimum of 7 years of specialty training (ST1–ST7), to be completed following the two years of foundation training. The programme is divided into basic, intermediate and advanced levels of training.


https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-t...raining-in-og/

https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-t...raining-in-og/

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...nd-development
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