Hsandhu
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Hi I’m beginning my a levels in September and before I confirm my choices I wanted to ask about my career choice. At uni I want to do engineering (either chemical or civil) but after speaking to teachers/family apparently jobs in the U.K. are limited and to get the best jobs I would need to move abroad. I’m not keen on moving and would much rather stay here. Is there a high demand In the U.K. for engineers in these sectors and where are the majority of U.K. jobs in these sectors based? Thanks in advance.
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Student-95
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There's not a high demand for graduate engineers. The number of grads is more than double the number of graduate level jobs.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Student-95)
There's not a high demand for graduate engineers. The number of grads is more than double the number of graduate level jobs.
The average salaries for engineering graduates - particularly from mid ranking universities - would seem to indicate that there is a demand for their skills. At least more so than most other degrees.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Hsandhu)
Hi I’m beginning my a levels in September and before I confirm my choices I wanted to ask about my career choice. At uni I want to do engineering (either chemical or civil) but after speaking to teachers/family apparently jobs in the U.K. are limited and to get the best jobs I would need to move abroad. I’m not keen on moving and would much rather stay here. Is there a high demand In the U.K. for engineers in these sectors and where are the majority of U.K. jobs in these sectors based? Thanks in advance.
There's a huge demand for well-qualified Engineers in the UK. Just look on any jobs website like Indeed.
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mnot
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(Original post by Hsandhu)
Hi I’m beginning my a levels in September and before I confirm my choices I wanted to ask about my career choice. At uni I want to do engineering (either chemical or civil) but after speaking to teachers/family apparently jobs in the U.K. are limited and to get the best jobs I would need to move abroad. I’m not keen on moving and would much rather stay here. Is there a high demand In the U.K. for engineers in these sectors and where are the majority of U.K. jobs in these sectors based? Thanks in advance.
it depends what you want for a job, the average salaries & percentage of grads employed implies that graduate engineers are very popular (not only for engineering but across a wider range of industries) some niche careers have a limited number of places that require an engineering degree hence are competitive and hard to get, but to find a 'good' job as an engineer generally is not a problem.
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Student-95
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(Original post by ajj2000)
The average salaries for engineering graduates - particularly from mid ranking universities - would seem to indicate that there is a demand for their skills. At least more so than most other degrees.
Like I said, the number of engineering grads is more than double the number of graduate level jobs. That's not high demand. If you get a job as an engineer then the salary is above average but most engineering grads won't.
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lawlietxtt
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(Original post by Student-95)
Like I said, the number of engineering grads is more than double the number of graduate level jobs. That's not high demand. If you get a job as an engineer then the salary is above average but most engineering grads won't.
1. That's a poor way of looking at it considering not all engineering grads want to go into engineering. Many go into finance, IT, business, management ect. So people like OP who do want to go into it have a higher chance.

2. Ironicly, if we're being relative it's still high demand. If you want to see genuine low demand, look at biology/psycology prospects.
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Student-95
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(Original post by lawlietxtt)
1. That's a poor way of looking at it considering not all engineering grads want to go into engineering. Many go into finance, IT, business, management ect. So people like OP who do want to go into it have a higher chance.

2. Ironicly, if we're being relative it's still high demand. If you want to see genuine low demand, look at biology/psycology prospects.
1. No it's not. Obviously some students will have gone off engineering but they are a minority. You wouldn't pick engineering if you planned to go into finance. Many of them go into things like finance because there aren't enough jobs in engineering.

2. Pointing to a field with even lower demand doesn't make it high. A majority of grads not entering the field is pretty bad for a vocational degree.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Student-95)
Like I said, the number of engineering grads is more than double the number of graduate level jobs. That's not high demand. If you get a job as an engineer then the salary is above average but most engineering grads won't.
No - if you take government records of earning per degree engineers come out really well - especially outside the top 10-15 or so universities. So compared with other degrees they are in demand, and earn notably more than most of their contemporaries. Engineering grad are pretty popular in consulting, IT, finance etc due to the type of maths and problem solving they have learned.
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artful_lounger
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Smack may be able to offer some insight.
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Student-95
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(Original post by ajj2000)
No - if you take government records of earning per degree engineers come out really well - especially outside the top 10-15 or so universities. So compared with other degrees they are in demand, and earn notably more than most of their contemporaries. Engineering grad are pretty popular in consulting, IT, finance etc due to the type of maths and problem solving they have learned.
Demand and salary is not the same thing. OP is asking if there is a high demand for engineers, not consultants or finance workers. At graduate level the answer is no.
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swelshie
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As said already there is only real demand after gaining a couple years post graduation experience. Competition is higher than ever before for entry level graduate roles, as evidenced by average graduate wages stagnating/decreasing in real terms- rising unemployment and underemployment stats.

So I would do a lot of research before choosing engineering nowadays. You need to really know what you're doing.

I'd say for some roles you need to have part-way trained yourself in order to be close to minimum standard, or have substantial experience in a particular area through placements/ but it varies a lot (there are tens of thousands of graduates and jobs each year across Engineering and Technology).

Higher demand for experienced engineers could be due to people leaving the profession for better pastures (aka any other management/generic graduate role) or simply fewer entry level roles than is needed to maintain an aging workforce.

It is a similar situation in other countries e.g. Canada/Australia (high ratios of graduates to entry level jobs despite better engineering industries) so not simply a case of opting to move abroad. It is a bit misleading the way university prospectuses "advertise" engineering as being in demand worldwide as again that comes later.
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mnot
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(Original post by swelshie)
As said already there is only real demand after gaining a couple years post graduation experience. Competition is higher than ever before for entry level graduate roles, as evidenced by average graduate wages stagnating/decreasing in real terms- rising unemployment and underemployment stats.

So I would do a lot of research before choosing engineering nowadays. You need to really know what you're doing.

I'd say for some roles you need to have part-way trained yourself in order to be close to minimum standard, or have substantial experience in a particular area through placements/ but it varies a lot (there are tens of thousands of graduates and jobs each year across Engineering and Technology).

Higher demand for experienced engineers could be due to people leaving the profession for better pastures (aka any other management/generic graduate role) or simply fewer entry level roles than is needed to maintain an aging workforce.

It is a similar situation in other countries e.g. Canada/Australia (high ratios of graduates to entry level jobs despite better engineering industries) so not simply a case of opting to move abroad. It is a bit misleading the way university prospectuses "advertise" engineering as being in demand worldwide as again that comes later.
There is less advertised positions for 'graduate engineers' then there are graduates, but once you factor in:
-Engineering jobs open for grads such as a junior design engineer or low level project engineer (these are also open to graduates normally)
-jobs in supply-chain, procurement & logistics that require engineers
-quality functions
-other industries that require technical understanding such as patent attorneys
then there are more jobs for grad engineers then graduates

but as well as these technical jobs a lot of engineers will also move into jobs:
-financial services
-Consulting (MBB etc.)
-Actuarial & pension type companies
-Big 4 firms/ accounting etc
-Start ups
-tech firms
-Entrepreneurs
-some even go back and become secondary school teachers
-some engineers go into pilot training afterwards... (for aero & mechanical degrees)
-military
-Civil service
-Random corporate grad schemes that almost all major companies have

Plenty of roles for graduate engineers: engineers are consistently some of the highest paid graduates & have very high employment metrics as well, are there some degrees that outperform engineering, yes (but not many) and it just depends what you want to study. If you love maths & physics but hate biology its a much better path then pursuing say medicine. Its a great path with lots of opportunity but is not right for everyone
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swelshie
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(Original post by mnot)
There is less advertised positions for 'graduate engineers' then there are graduates, but once you factor in:
-Engineering jobs open for grads such as a junior design engineer or low level project engineer (these are also open to graduates normally)
-jobs in supply-chain, procurement & logistics that require engineers
-quality functions
-other industries that require technical understanding such as patent attorneys
then there are more jobs for grad engineers then graduates

but as well as these technical jobs a lot of engineers will also move into jobs:
-financial services
-Consulting (MBB etc.)
-Actuarial & pension type companies
-Big 4 firms/ accounting etc
-Start ups
-tech firms
-Entrepreneurs
-some even go back and become secondary school teachers
-some engineers go into pilot training afterwards... (for aero & mechanical degrees)
-military
-Civil service
-Random corporate grad schemes that almost all major companies have

Plenty of roles for graduate engineers: engineers are consistently some of the highest paid graduates & have very high employment metrics as well, are there some degrees that outperform engineering, yes (but not many) and it just depends what you want to study. If you love maths & physics but hate biology its a much better path then pursuing say medicine. Its a great path with lots of opportunity but is not right for everyone
So why would you say that is not reflected in the statistics? If there were plenty of opportunities for graduate engineers the average salary would be increasing not decreasing. % reporting they regret studying engineering would be better than I think the 50% it is now (for mechanical anyway).
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mnot
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(Original post by swelshie)
So why would you say that is not reflected in the statistics? If there were plenty of opportunities for graduate engineers the average salary would be increasing not decreasing. % reporting they regret studying engineering would be better than I think the 50% it is now (for mechanical anyway).
% employment is around 95% currently & depending on sources the average salary is between £28K-£30K & for a first year graduate (rising fairly quickly in the first 5 years). This is up from an average salary of £26K in 2015 so above RPI & inflation. Like I said some careers pay more but this is very high when compared to most courses (including other STEM degrees)
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swelshie
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(Original post by mnot)
% employment is around 95% currently & depending on sources the average salary is between £28K-£30K & for a first year graduate (rising fairly quickly in the first 5 years). This is up from an average salary of £26K in 2015 so above RPI & inflation. Like I said some careers pay more but this is very high when compared to most courses (including other STEM degrees)
Not sure about 95% employment -should be a figure in mid 60s + further study. Median salary for 2015 was £27500 (£24-31k) and for 2019 £27000 (£22-31k).

Even back as far as 2009 these figures are similar for MEng level.
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ARUStudents
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There is a high demand in engineering graduates, however there is also high competition as there are many graduates.
I would advice you build your skill set during university to enable you stand out.
I would not know where the civil engineering jobs in the uk are as I am in a different specialty.
I hope this helps.
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