An A/A* student is not a ‘smart’ person Watch

Djtoodles
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#101
Report 1 month ago
#101
In my experience no academic qualification from GCSE to Masters Degree actually means youre intelligent. I didnt learn a thing from my degree or masters degree but got distinction in both. Its about knowing the system not knowing the subject.
2
reply
Retired_Messiah
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#102
Report 1 month ago
#102
(Original post by Tolgarda)
'Terribly specific'? What? You mean that the mark scheme just wants the correct answer? What a shocker!
tbf I remember things in A level bio occasionally being a bit weird in that you wouldn't get marks for something technically correct because you weren't specific enough, with the question itself never specifying the level of depth it was after.

Tended to only be a problem for a couple of marks per paper in my experience though.
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#103
Report 1 month ago
#103
(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
tbf I remember things in A level bio occasionally being a bit weird in that you wouldn't get marks for something technically correct because you weren't specific enough, with the question itself never specifying the level of depth it was after.
So, it just wanted the correct answer, not a 'technically' correct' one. I see. Seems pretty fair.
0
reply
Retired_Messiah
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#104
Report 1 month ago
#104
(Original post by Tolgarda)
So, it just wanted the correct answer, not a 'technically' correct' one. I see. Seems pretty fair.
"technically correct" would be the same as a "correct" one. If it wasn't the correct answer it wouldn't be technically correct. But the technically correct would become "wrong" because of pure exam technique rather than anything to do with one's biology proficiency.
0
reply
meme259
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#105
Report 1 month ago
#105
smart ppl r smart enough to know that u have to learn the mark scheme to do well and therefore they do well
0
reply
Tolgarda
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#106
Report 1 month ago
#106
(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
"technically correct" would be the same as a "correct" one. If it wasn't the correct answer it wouldn't be technically correct. But the technically correct would become "wrong" because of pure exam technique rather than anything to do with one's biology proficiency.
You mean the exam technique of accurately selecting specific terms, concepts and examples in your answer? That seems entirely fair.
0
reply
black1blade
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#107
Report 1 month ago
#107
(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
"technically correct" would be the same as a "correct" one. If it wasn't the correct answer it wouldn't be technically correct. But the technically correct would become "wrong" because of pure exam technique rather than anything to do with one's biology proficiency.
Thing is with stupid things like that, basically nobody gets those marks so it doesn't really matter. Our physics teacher looked at a break down of the AS paper average marks per question part and some of the averages were like 0.1/2 XD.
0
reply
black1blade
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#108
Report 1 month ago
#108
(Original post by Tolgarda)
You mean the exam technique of accurately selecting specific terms, concepts and examples in your answer? That seems entirely fair.
There are cases where 2 terms/ statements are pretty much totally equivalent and even in the textbook ect ect but it's not on the markscheme. This is a issue that arises due to the mass marking required. The person writing the markscheme may not have considered all the possible correct answers but not every marker is an expert so if personal judgement was used, it would be pretty unfair. At uni, often the people that write a particular question mark all the attempts, they know what they are looking for and give credit for correct answers even ones that aren't exactly what they had in mind.
2
reply
Retired_Messiah
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#109
Report 1 month ago
#109
(Original post by black1blade)
Thing is with stupid things like that, basically nobody gets those marks so it doesn't really matter. Our physics teacher looked at a break down of the AS paper average marks per question part and some of the averages were like 0.1/2 XD.
Yeah it tends not to make too much difference but it was always ****ing annoying nonetheless.
0
reply
Ratchet Hoe
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#110
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#110
(Original post by black1blade)
There are cases where 2 terms/ statements are pretty much totally equivalent and even in the textbook ect ect but it's not on the markscheme. This is a issue that arises due to the mass marking required. The person writing the markscheme may not have considered all the possible correct answers but not every marker is an expert so if personal judgement was used, it would be pretty unfair. At uni, often the people that write a particular question mark all the attempts, they know what they are looking for and give credit for correct answers even ones that aren't exactly what they had in mind.
Very true! University seems harder, but at the same time your interpretation is more open
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,469

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (220)
12.45%
Excited (166)
9.39%
Worried (308)
17.43%
Terrified (389)
22.01%
Meh (184)
10.41%
Confused (39)
2.21%
Putting on a brave face (244)
13.81%
Impatient (217)
12.28%

Watched Threads

View All