Imperial Electronic and Information Engineering Watch

Anonymous #1
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Hi im in year 12 and thinking of doing electronic and information engineering at imperial. If any of you have had an offer or go there, what were your predicted grades and what was the offer for you, and what is the interview like?
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yourgyalsmcm
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erob
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I had an offer for A*AA, where the A* has to be in Mathematics and the AA is in physics and computing.I got AAA in AS in these subject and did not take further maths AS in year 12.I took the further maths AS this year in addition to the three A-levels but did not end up doing the exam becuase it was not included in my offer and I wanted to focus on my other subjects.In terms of the interview i have heard mixed reports. My interviewer wasn't as harsh. We talked about what i had put on my personal statement and then did a moderatly difficult maths problem. I have heard from others though that they had more intense interviews that were more drilling on the details of the personal statement and the amount of maths problems they went through. One key point i took from talking to others is that they are very keen on finding out why you choose to study the EIE branch and not the EEE branch.
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emiliawhitehouse
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Thanks so much for this. So were your predicted grades A*AA? And also did you include any work experience in your personal statement?
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erob
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My predicted grades were A*AA.

I did work experience at small IT buisness for a week.
(Original post by emiliawhitehouse)
Thanks so much for this. So were your predicted grades A*AA? And also did you include any work experience in your personal statement?
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highcaffeinejava
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I got an A*AA offer for EIE MEng. I did Maths, FM, Physics and Chemistry (my offer doesn't apply to chemistry) but I didn't have any work experience, just a couple summer schools at other universities. I did, however, include a couple of personal projects I'd been doing (just microcontrollers, LEDs and such) as well as my involvement in my school's STEM outreach (teaching in primary schools and giving talks at societies).

One thing you might want to know if you're applying in this coming cycle (for September 2020) is that you no longer need to choose between EEE and EIE as they now have a common first year (even starting this September) so you don't actually have to decide until I think part way through or at the end of second year (there are certain Y2 modules that are compulsory for EIE).

Also, EIE and EEE students are treated basically the same throughout the application process (at my interview, I only saw four or five other EIE applicants, all the rest were EEE and my interviewer just assumed I applied for EEE). This might be because EIE students are in a significant minority in the department, but it's just so you know.

That being said, most people who I've spoken to who chose EIE (myself included) have said it was because they liked CompSci but wanted to cover more hardware or they preferred coding and software engineering to the idea of learning about things like power production and transfer (the electrical side of the course).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by highcaffeinejava)
I got an A*AA offer for EIE MEng. I did Maths, FM, Physics and Chemistry (my offer doesn't apply to chemistry) but I didn't have any work experience, just a couple summer schools at other universities. I did, however, include a couple of personal projects I'd been doing (just microcontrollers, LEDs and such) as well as my involvement in my school's STEM outreach (teaching in primary schools and giving talks at societies).

One thing you might want to know if you're applying in this coming cycle (for September 2020) is that you no longer need to choose between EEE and EIE as they now have a common first year (even starting this September) so you don't actually have to decide until I think part way through or at the end of second year (there are certain Y2 modules that are compulsory for EIE).

Also, EIE and EEE students are treated basically the same throughout the application process (at my interview, I only saw four or five other EIE applicants, all the rest were EEE and my interviewer just assumed I applied for EEE). This might be because EIE students are in a significant minority in the department, but it's just so you know.

That being said, most people who I've spoken to who chose EIE (myself included) have said it was because they liked CompSci but wanted to cover more hardware or they preferred coding and software engineering to the idea of learning about things like power production and transfer (the electrical side of the course).
Thanks so much, this was really helpful. Did you find the interview difficult? Also, in your personal statement did you talk about any books and in EIE, does it cover things like machine learning?
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highcaffeinejava
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks so much, this was really helpful. Did you find the interview difficult? Also, in your personal statement did you talk about any books and in EIE, does it cover things like machine learning?
I didn't really include any writing per se other than the article 'As We May Think' which is basically the earliest written concept of what would eventually become the personal computer. I used it to talk about how "seeing how far we've come excites me to think of how far we could go in the future" (it was written more cheesily in the real thing).

In the interview, I did get a difficult graph to draw but he seemed far more interested in my thought process and was constantly asking questions about just that. Aside from that it was really relaxed but that might've just been the lecturer I got. All the other questions were about my extra-curricular stuff that I wrote in my PS (student council, NCS, "part-time job", etc.)

Some advice is that you should look into the area of study of your interviewer (they tell you a few days before the interview) especially if you don't know what it is. At the end you'll have the chance to ask general questions. Idk if it helped me, but my interviewer seemed really happy when I asked about a couple of related things that just came into mind as I was in the interview (I wouldn't make it too obvious though, since no one likes a stalker). Alternatively you can borrow some of the stock questions I used in all of my interviews (I had four, btw):
1. How is the course divided between practical and theory?
2. Is there a lot of group work? (make sure you get across that you totally like group work because there's a lot of that for all engineering)
3. Is there a hackerspace/recreational workshop? (there is btw, but the responses are interesting every time e.g a lot of ppl join the robotics club just because they have more 3D printers than any single department and you'll need them for some projects)
But seriously don't be too strategic in what you ask (in terms of leaving a good impression) as long as you come across genuine enough and actually engage with the interviewer, it should go smoothly.
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Anonymous #1
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Thank you so much, this was very helpful. Did you apply for electronic and information engineering elsewhere? (as not many universities offer electronic and information I think)
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