epicnm
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I am in Year 10, going into year 11 in September. Realistically I feel as though my school is behind. I have never learnt regular verb endings in the present tense and only know how to form tenses when the verb ends in -er and is after ‘Je’. I am fairly confident in 90 and 150 words in writing and have done some speaking practice. But the only topics we’ve done are family and technology. We haven’t done going out, home and village, global problems, festivals or global issues. I have less than a year till I sit this GCSE. Are my school behind in GCSE French and if so, what should I know(in terms of writing/reading/speaking/listening, grammar, themes) by the end of year 10. Thanks
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sqrt of 5
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ok first off don't panic! if you think that you're behind the first thing to do is to check the specification.

aqa: https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...58-SP-2016.PDF
edexcel: https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...58-SP-2016.PDF

here you can find everything that you need to know about the subject. dm me if you need any specific info about gcse french
(Original post by epicnm)
I am in Year 10, going into year 11 in September. Realistically I feel as though my school is behind. I have never learnt regular verb endings in the present tense and only know how to form tenses when the verb ends in -er and is after ‘Je’. I am fairly confident in 90 and 150 words in writing and have done some speaking practice. But the only topics we’ve done are family and technology. We haven’t done going out, home and village, global problems, festivals or global issues. I have less than a year till I sit this GCSE. Are my school behind in GCSE French and if so, what should I know(in terms of writing/reading/speaking/listening, grammar, themes) by the end of year 10. Thanks
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AzureCeleste
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Wether you are behind or not depends on your school, the speed they teach at and when they cover everything

What tenses can you do in French?
I'd have thought as a bare minimum you'd know the present tense for -er, -ir, and -re verbs (plus the common irregular ones) and then the past tense but as I said above, your school will cover it in their own way
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sqrt of 5
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Wether you are behind or not depends on your school, the speed they teach at and when they cover everything

What tenses can you do in French?
I'd have thought as a bare minimum you'd know the present tense for -er, -ir, and -re verbs (plus the common irregular ones) and then the past tense but as I said above, your school will cover it in their own way
not always true lol
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username4310824
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(Original post by epicnm)
I am in Year 10, going into year 11 in September. Realistically I feel as though my school is behind. I have never learnt regular verb endings in the present tense and only know how to form tenses when the verb ends in -er and is after ‘Je’. I am fairly confident in 90 and 150 words in writing and have done some speaking practice. But the only topics we’ve done are family and technology. We haven’t done going out, home and village, global problems, festivals or global issues. I have less than a year till I sit this GCSE. Are my school behind in GCSE French and if so, what should I know(in terms of writing/reading/speaking/listening, grammar, themes) by the end of year 10. Thanks
It does sound like you're a bit behind. However, it wouldn't take too long to catch up.

If you haven't got much on this summer you could always teach yourself some. Have a look at the spec posted above to see what you need to know. The level of grammar knowledge required at GCSE isn't too complex but it does require quite a bit of memorisation (especially the irregular verbs).

Vocab wise I'd recommend checking out either Quizlet or Memrise. You can find vocabulary sets on there tailored to GCSE exam boards. For example if you typed in ''GCSE AQA French Festivals'' you will probably be able to find sets with all the essential vocab.

Make sure you know a range of good connectives and opinion phrases for your speaking and writing exams, too. Practice with past papers and make notes of any vocabulary you didn't know and learn them.
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epicnm
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Thanks for this! I’ve checked the specification for AQA and seem to be fairly behind, especially in the themes we’ve covered. Thanks.
(Original post by sqrt of 5)
ok first off don't panic! if you think that you're behind the first thing to do is to check the specification.

aqa: https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...58-SP-2016.PDF
edexcel: https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...58-SP-2016.PDF

here you can find everything that you need to know about the subject. dm me if you need any specific info about gcse french
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epicnm
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To be honest it feels like a fairly slow pace. I was surprised when I heard about we had to know the present tense endings for regular verbs because despite our teacher using it when he writes, we’ve never actually been told them. I can form the tenses for ‘er’ verbs when they come after je
E.g J’ai regardé
Je regarde
Je regarderai
Je regarderais
But wouldn’t have a clue to do it in any other tu/il/Elle/nous/vous form
(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Wether you are behind or not depends on your school, the speed they teach at and when they cover everything

What tenses can you do in French?
I'd have thought as a bare minimum you'd know the present tense for -er, -ir, and -re verbs (plus the common irregular ones) and then the past tense but as I said above, your school will cover it in their own way
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epicnm
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Hi, thanks so much.
I think I’m definitely going to use this summer to catch up. I’ve also bought the CGP French revision guide which really has shown how much I don’t know. Do you have any more tips for getting a high grade(I’m aiming for a 7-9 in French) thanks!
(Original post by MinaBee)
It does sound like you're a bit behind. However, it wouldn't take too long to catch up.

If you haven't got much on this summer you could always teach yourself some. Have a look at the spec posted above to see what you need to know. The level of grammar knowledge required at GCSE isn't too complex but it does require quite a bit of memorisation (especially the irregular verbs).

Vocab wise I'd recommend checking out either Quizlet or Memrise. You can find vocabulary sets on there tailored to GCSE exam boards. For example if you typed in ''GCSE AQA French Festivals'' you will probably be able to find sets with all the essential vocab.

Make sure you know a range of good connectives and opinion phrases for your speaking and writing exams, too. Practice with past papers and make notes of any vocabulary you didn't know and learn them.
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sqrt of 5
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(Original post by epicnm)
To be honest it feels like a fairly slow pace. I was surprised when I heard about we had to know the present tense endings for regular verbs because despite our teacher using it when he writes, we’ve never actually been told them. I can form the tenses for ‘er’ verbs when they come after je
E.g J’ai regardé
Je regarde
Je regarderai
Je regarderais
But wouldn’t have a clue to do it in any other tu/il/Elle/nous/vous form
i can give you access to my aqa french ebook if you need it
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BosslyGaming
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First of all, don't panic. I wasn't great with tenses at the end of year 10 (slightly better than you right now, but not much) - then this year I learned loads of stuff and it really begun to click properly, taking my grade up massively compared to Year 10. (hoping for an 8, though the exams didn't feel great so not 100% sure what I will get). Generally, in all subjects, I found that I learned so much in this last year, compared to the other 4, and the grade improvements reflected that.

If you have any questions on anything specific then don't be at all afraid to ask in this forum, and someone helpful will do what they can to help you understand. If you wanted to PM me at all with any questions I'd be more than happy to help out, though by no means do you have to do that. As already mentioned, try using services like Quizlet as they can be super useful. I didn't use them much and I do really wish I did. I also found it really useful to sit down and test yourself on the different verbs/pronouns. So, for example, begin with an infinitive verb at the top and write 'Je, Tu, Il/Elle, Nous, Vous, Ils/Elles' in one column, and test yourself on conjugating the infinitive into the correct form for each pronoun.
Visual Example: (present tense, I noted you said you hadn't learned them so here they are for present tense regular -er verbs)
Image
Mark down ones you don't get, research them again and test yourself on them again. Make sure you try different infinitives (-er, -ir, -re) and put them into different tenses. You might struggle to begin with and try not to be put off. You absolutely need to test yourself because through that you can find exactly what you do and don't know and begin to learn it. Even if you had a completely blank table, you can learn it with some determination and focus. My advice would be to learn the present tense for all types of verb first (including some irregular verbs e.g. Faire, Boire) - then move onto the past and then try and build in some future tense. Remember that you don't necessarily have to learn a 'perfect' future tense and you can form the future with "Je vais + infinitive" e.g. Je vais jouer = I am going to play. If you do want the top grades you will want to delve into more advanced tenses, but don't worry about those until you have past, present and future nailed down. Those 3 are the most important and should be learned as an absolute priority.

Also, for the writing and speaking you absolutely need adjectives and opinion phrases. Just learn some and roll them off your tongue. Try to learn a variety of these and try not to repeat yourself, you'll get marks if you can show good variety in your language.

Apologies for the longgggg response and apologies again if you don't understand everything I've referenced, if you want me to try to elaborate on something then I'll be happy to do so. Just focus on what you're doing, and make sure to revise stuff you don't know - not stuff you do know.

Bonne chance pour vos examens !
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AzureCeleste
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(Original post by epicnm)
To be honest it feels like a fairly slow pace. I was surprised when I heard about we had to know the present tense endings for regular verbs because despite our teacher using it when he writes, we’ve never actually been told them. I can form the tenses for ‘er’ verbs when they come after je
E.g J’ai regardé
Je regarde
Je regarderai
Je regarderais
But wouldn’t have a clue to do it in any other tu/il/Elle/nous/vous form
Yeah, you should know it for all the other forms as well to be honest. Surprised you don't but then it may just be the way your teacher is teaching it. I'd ask at the beginning of the year concerning it or potentially teach yourself now

(Original post by sqrt of 5)
not always true lol
What part is not always true?
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epicnm
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Thanks, that would be great!
(Original post by sqrt of 5)
i can give you access to my aqa french ebook if you need it
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epicnm
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Thanks so much for this, it’s really helped. I’ve been researching forming the tenses and surprised at how much I don’t know, despite me being able to attain most of the marks in French writing. The only thing I can think of is that our teacher isn’t teaching us french, but teaching us a way that will make us avoid making mistakes and specifically what we need for the exam. I think I’ll definitley start creating verb tables for the present tense to start and then focus on moving through with the different tenses. Apart from avoir/etre/aller, what other irregular verbs do I need to know and what tense is it necessary to know these verbs in if I’m aiming for an 8. I think I’m fairly good at opinion phrases as my school has a system where you form an opinion, justify it and give a contrast to that opinion, which is why we have very narrowly been focused on it. But I’m not sure if this is limiting me in terms of achieving best marks? Also how did you practice speaking. No one else in my house can speak french and whilst I have been talking to myself, I’m not being corrected when I make mistakes. Obviously during year 10, we were kind of ignored by teachers due to them being focused purely on Year 11s but hopefully they will now spend more time developing our speaking skills. Thanks again for this. And any further advice on how to get top marks would be extremely appreciated! Merci!
(Original post by BosslyGaming)
First of all, don't panic. I wasn't great with tenses at the end of year 10 (slightly better than you right now, but not much) - then this year I learned loads of stuff and it really begun to click properly, taking my grade up massively compared to Year 10. (hoping for an 8, though the exams didn't feel great so not 100% sure what I will get). Generally, in all subjects, I found that I learned so much in this last year, compared to the other 4, and the grade improvements reflected that.

If you have any questions on anything specific then don't be at all afraid to ask in this forum, and someone helpful will do what they can to help you understand. If you wanted to PM me at all with any questions I'd be more than happy to help out, though by no means do you have to do that. As already mentioned, try using services like Quizlet as they can be super useful. I didn't use them much and I do really wish I did. I also found it really useful to sit down and test yourself on the different verbs/pronouns. So, for example, begin with an infinitive verb at the top and write 'Je, Tu, Il/Elle, Nous, Vous, Ils/Elles' in one column, and test yourself on conjugating the infinitive into the correct form for each pronoun.
Visual Example: (present tense, I noted you said you hadn't learned them so here they are for present tense regular -er verbs)
Image
Mark down ones you don't get, research them again and test yourself on them again. Make sure you try different infinitives (-er, -ir, -re) and put them into different tenses. You might struggle to begin with and try not to be put off. You absolutely need to test yourself because through that you can find exactly what you do and don't know and begin to learn it. Even if you had a completely blank table, you can learn it with some determination and focus. My advice would be to learn the present tense for all types of verb first (including some irregular verbs e.g. Faire, Boire) - then move onto the past and then try and build in some future tense. Remember that you don't necessarily have to learn a 'perfect' future tense and you can form the future with "Je vais + infinitive" e.g. Je vais jouer = I am going to play. If you do want the top grades you will want to delve into more advanced tenses, but don't worry about those until you have past, present and future nailed down. Those 3 are the most important and should be learned as an absolute priority.

Also, for the writing and speaking you absolutely need adjectives and opinion phrases. Just learn some and roll them off your tongue. Try to learn a variety of these and try not to repeat yourself, you'll get marks if you can show good variety in your language.

Apologies for the longgggg response and apologies again if you don't understand everything I've referenced, if you want me to try to elaborate on something then I'll be happy to do so. Just focus on what you're doing, and make sure to revise stuff you don't know - not stuff you do know.

Bonne chance pour vos examens !
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epicnm
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I was surprised as well! When I first found this out, I was shocked. It wasn’t like I didn’t realise that verb endings changed depending on the person, but my school during the 4 years I’ve been learning french(not to mention 4 further years in primary) has not put a single bit of emphasis on learning them. I think I’ll definitley be self teaching myself them. Thanks!
(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Yeah, you should know it for all the other forms as well to be honest. Surprised you don't but then it may just be the way your teacher is teaching it. I'd ask at the beginning of the year concerning it or potentially teach yourself now



What part is not always true?
I
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BosslyGaming
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Yeah your teachers should focus more on speaking with you in Year 11. We did literally zero speaking practice before Year 11. I can't really help with how to correct mistakes in pronounciation as I sorted that through practice with my teachers - I agree that it sucks when you have to rely on teachers fixing your pronounciation and if they don't it's a problem. I'd suggest searching online (YouTube etc) for example pronounciation videos. If there's a sound you're struggling with, it's probably got a solution online as it won't only be you struggling with that.

Here's a list of irregular verbs I'd suggest:
Dire = To say
Faire = To do
Pouvoir = To be able to
Boire = To drink
Savoir = To know
Voir = To see
Lire = To read
Prendre = To take
Devoir = To have to

There's probably more than this that would be good to know, but there's the ones that come off the top of my head. If you have any questions about any of them feel free to reach out.
(Original post by epicnm)
Thanks so much for this, it’s really helped. I’ve been researching forming the tenses and surprised at how much I don’t know, despite me being able to attain most of the marks in French writing. The only thing I can think of is that our teacher isn’t teaching us french, but teaching us a way that will make us avoid making mistakes and specifically what we need for the exam. I think I’ll definitley start creating verb tables for the present tense to start and then focus on moving through with the different tenses. Apart from avoir/etre/aller, what other irregular verbs do I need to know and what tense is it necessary to know these verbs in if I’m aiming for an 8. I think I’m fairly good at opinion phrases as my school has a system where you form an opinion, justify it and give a contrast to that opinion, which is why we have very narrowly been focused on it. But I’m not sure if this is limiting me in terms of achieving best marks? Also how did you practice speaking. No one else in my house can speak french and whilst I have been talking to myself, I’m not being corrected when I make mistakes. Obviously during year 10, we were kind of ignored by teachers due to them being focused purely on Year 11s but hopefully they will now spend more time developing our speaking skills. Thanks again for this. And any further advice on how to get top marks would be extremely appreciated! Merci!
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