1st superstar
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#61
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#61
(Original post by Arran90)
There are plenty of teenagers who enjoy reading modern or children's fiction, or watch films, but classical literature is a completely different ball game for them. I get the impression that classical literature is a Marmite subject - you either love or hate it.

This still doesn't explain the level of popularity English literature has at A Level - even back in the years before there was all this nonsense about facilitating subjects.

It is notable that English literature is very classless as an A Level and is taken both by public school students and council estate kids. Economics and Latin are dominated by students in independent schools whereas psychology and sociology are 6th form college subjects.
agreed teens should have the option to stay modern books
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Evil Homer
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#62
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#62
(Original post by 1st superstar)
sorry for replying 3 months late but imma gonna say something: IT DOESN'T HELP YOU FOR THE FUTURE TEACH ME HOW TO WRITE A CV NOT A PAGE ESSAY ON AN OLD 100-400 YEAR OLD BOOK we need a new education system!!!
You are working from the basis that education is only a worthwhile pursuit if it helps your future career prospects, is that necessarily true?
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#63
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#63
(Original post by Evil Homer)
You are working from the basis that education is only a worthwhile pursuit if it helps your future career prospects, is that necessarily true?
but for most jobs you don't need to know facts on a 100-400 year old book using "my" logic then why aren't we learning valuable life skills in school (i could list a whole load but here's some of the main ones): politics, how to cook, how to do taxes (as you need to do them by yourself in most countries), how to write a CV, how to defend yourself far better than learning about a useless 100-400 year old book. I have/ (or have had) 3-10 jobs ideas in my head and none of them involve me need to know some English lit (these jobs in my head are both academic and non-academic jobs). being a primary school teacher, being an accountant, owning a cafe, starting a business etc none and mean none of them involve me needing to know the foggiest thing about Shakespeare?!?! :afraid::aetsch::dontknow::rofl:
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#64
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#64
(Original post by Evil Homer)
You are working from the basis that education is only a worthwhile pursuit if it helps your future career prospects, is that necessarily true?
English on historical fictional books is by far the least needed subject if you want to do anything outside an English or Philosophical career. At least philosophy makes sense (and I support philosophy as it can be optional at some schools for GCSEs) I have not would have problem with English lit if you were given the option to opt out of it during GCSEs and if it wasn't a "facilitating subject" those 4 hrs per fortnight are a waste a could be used to do other things (even if it just means analysing more modern books) or even better...learning life skills!! :woohoo: .Even 100 years ago people were taught life skills in school (women were taught how to cook, men were taught how to exercise, prepare for the workforce skills they all of them needed to know for their generation) the skills we learn now in school do not correlate to the skills we need now for the 21st century "real world" of work unless you are willing to do something academic (but not everyone is willing to go down that route...). If you enjoy English lit great do it but the government shouldn't be shoving down subjects in people's throats that are 80% of the time not going to help you for the future... instead have compulsory grammar tests like in other countries
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Arran90
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#65
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#65
(Original post by Evil Homer)
You are working from the basis that education is only a worthwhile pursuit if it helps your future career prospects, is that necessarily true?
Perhaps the classics of literature are best reserved for bed time reading and after school clubs rather than studied for A Level.
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_gracecharlie
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#66
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#66
I love reading and writing but for some reason both the English GCSEs made no sense to me..I found language very prescriptive and weirdly formatted and in literature the analysis and themes went well over my head (I did really enjoy reading the poems and to a degree the novels too). They were also my two lowest grades at 6 (lit) and 7 (lang).
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Vinny C
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#67
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Because I was better at it than most French? The question ought to be... why did you take English at A level?
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Vinny C
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#68
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#68
Yummy... sounds lie something nice to eat. A pharmacy salary.
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1st superstar
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#69
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#69
(Original post by Arran90)
Perhaps the classics of literature are best reserved for bed time reading and after school clubs rather than studied for A Level.
Lmao 😂😂 i need you to come a help me speak to a person who thinks that learning English lit is a good idea... https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...3#post85926072
Last edited by 1st superstar; 1 week ago
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1st superstar
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#70
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#70
(Original post by ThomH97)
GCSE English was complete BS. To do well (I got As in Lit and Lang) all you had to do was make up some crazy person's interpretation (with quote), contrast it with another crazy person's interpretation, pick one you think had more weight and repeat until exam time ran out. It was just a test to see how much nonsense you could write in 2 hours and I certainly didn't want to do any more of that at A Level.

It just seemed a rubbish subject that was 'compulsory'. Reading junk poetry and Shakespeare that aren't even in proper English just made it seem even more silly. I get that I need to know how to read, write and spell, and doing more complicated versions of that again and again makes me better at communicating, but most of the stuff I wrote in the exams I wouldn't say to another person unless I was trying to wind them up.

It's good that more people are moving to STEM. Employers now need to do their bit and actually finish things by training these graduates rather than relying on poaching from other companies.
Agreed
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pon1de2replay3
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#71
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i started the a level and hated it within a week - too pretentious for me and takes all the fun out of reading
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Anonymous__02
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#72
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#72
(Original post by pon1de2replay3)
i started the a level and hated it within a week - too pretentious for me and takes all the fun out of reading
Yep, exactly the same here dropped it after about 4 lessons
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pon1de2replay3
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#73
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#73
(Original post by Anonymous__02)
Yep, exactly the same here dropped it after about 4 lessons
yeah exactly so so glad i did haha
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ArtmisKco
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#74
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#74
Hated literature. I took it as gcse in year 10 but to think I fell in love with it in year 9 and was absolutely certain that I’d take it for a levels. But my teachers ruined it. They were crap and there was far too much pressure for us to do well as literature was the only gcse we did a year early. But I love love loved language. It was amazing! We write stories and whilst it had a bit of literature in it was still brilliant and fun!! What out me off from taking Lang to alevel was that in my practice tests at gcse I always got low and the grades were decreasing however with barely any English revision I did super in my gcse. Which got me thinking that I don’t want to take a subject which the marking is subjective otherwise I’ll keep on giving myself a heart attack
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ArtmisKco
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#75
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#75
(Original post by 1st superstar)
English on historical fictional books is by far the least needed subject if you want to do anything outside an English or Philosophical career. At least philosophy makes sense (and I support philosophy as it can be optional at some schools for GCSEs) I have not would have problem with English lit if you were given the option to opt out of it during GCSEs and if it wasn't a "facilitating subject" those 4 hrs per fortnight are a waste a could be used to do other things (even if it just means analysing more modern books) or even better...learning life skills!! :woohoo: .Even 100 years ago people were taught life skills in school (women were taught how to cook, men were taught how to exercise, prepare for the workforce skills they all of them needed to know for their generation) the skills we learn now in school do not correlate to the skills we need now for the 21st century "real world" of work unless you are willing to do something academic (but not everyone is willing to go down that route...). If you enjoy English lit great do it but the government shouldn't be shoving down subjects in people's throats that are 80% of the time not going to help you for the future... instead have compulsory grammar tests like in other countries
I agree with this. Unless you absolutely love it and you’re more than likely ok with becoming an English teacher then go for it. But man literature sucked the fun out of reading
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Vinny C
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#76
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#76
(Original post by 1st superstar)
Lmao 😂😂 i need you to come a help me speak to a person who thinks that learning English lit is a good idea... https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...3#post85926072
To be... or not to be. You have to break every rule in French grammar to translate that one, lol. Etre ou pas d'etre?
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