Analyse this extract, is this subtextual for copulation?

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liaente
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I'm beginning to read as preparation for sixth form in which I am doing English Literature. I want to know if this extract is subtextual to copulation? If not, please tell me what you found interesting in the author's writing

I'm going to highlight in bold the ones I particularly think are those. [edited as soon as I post]

This comes from the book: WITCHER - LAST WISH:
She came to him towards morning.
She entered very carefully, moving silently, floating through the chamber like a phantom; the only sound was that of her mantle brushing her naked skin. Yet this faint sound was enough to wake the witcher – or maybe it only tore him from the half-slumber in which he rocked monotonously, as though travelling though fathomless depths, suspended between the sea bed and its calm surface amidst gently undulating strands of seaweed.
He did not move, did not stir. The girl flitted closer, threw off her mantle and slowly, hesitantly, rested her knee on the edge of the large bed. He observed her through lowered lashes, still not betraying his wakefulness. The girl carefully climbed onto the bedclothes, and onto him, wrapping her thighs around him.
Leaning forward on straining arms, she brushed his face with hair which smelt of chamomile. Determined, and as if impatient, she leant over and touched his eyelids, cheeks, lips with the tips of her breasts. He smiled, very slowly, delicately, grasping her by the shoulders, and she straightened, escaping his fingers. She was
radiant, luminous in the misty brilliance of dawn. He moved, but with pressure from both hands, she forbade him to change position and, with a light but decisive movement of her hips, demanded a response.
He responded. She no longer backed away from his hands; she threw her head back, shook her hair. Her skin was cool and surprisingly smooth. Her eyes, glimpsed when her face came close to his, were huge and dark as the eyes of a water nymph.
Rocked, he sank into a sea of chamomile as it grew agitated and seethed.
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Davy611
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I don't think it's subtextual; I think it's very literal. Doesn't leave much to the imagination. I'm not a fan of this kind of writing, personally. I see it's translated from Polish; I don't think this helps as it makes it very clunky.
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liaente
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A way to insult :lol:
Then what would be your ideal writing? What do you think "leaves a lot for the imagination"? Anne with an E?

(Original post by Davy611)
I don't think it's subtextual; I think it's very literal. Doesn't leave much to the imagination. I'm not a fan of this kind of writing, personally. I see it's translated from Polish; I don't think this helps as it makes it very clunky.
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Davy611
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Don't know about ideal writing; I like a lot of styles. I want to believe in the characters that I'm reading and I'm more engaged if the sexuality is subtle. This is quite good:

There was nothing but obliterating sensation, thrilling and swelling, and the sound of fabric on fabric and skin on fabric as their limbs slid across each other in this restless, sensuous wrestling. His experience was limited and he knew only at second hand that they need not lie down. As for her, beyond all film the films she had seen, and all the novels and lyrical poems she had read, she had no experience at all. Despite these limitations, it did not surprise them how clearly they knew their own needs.

It's from 'Atonement' by Ian McEwan. I just think it reflects real people, real feelings and real sexuality a little more effectively than the extract above. I think it's much better writing too. That's just my opinion though. Different people like different things

(Original post by liaente)
A way to insult :lol:
Then what would be your ideal writing? What do you think "leaves a lot for the imagination"? Anne with an E?
Last edited by Davy611; 1 year ago
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liaente
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Thank you very much! yeah I agree, it's a pleasant extract to read.
This particular book is a fantasy book so yeah it may not be to everyone's taste.
Ty again!
(Original post by Davy611)
Don't know about ideal writing; I like a lot of styles. I want to believe in the characters that I'm reading and I'm more engaged if the sexuality is subtle. This is quite good:

There was nothing but obliterating sensation, thrilling and swelling, and the sound of fabric on fabric and skin on fabric as their limbs slid across each other in this restless, sensuous wrestling. His experience was limited and he knew only at second hand that they need not lie down. As for her, beyond all film the films she had seen, and all the novels and lyrical poems she had read, she had no experience at all. Despite these limitations, it did not surprise them how clearly they knew their own needs.

It's from 'Atonement' by Ian McEwan. I just think it reflects real people, real feelings and real sexuality a little more effectively than the extract above. I think it's much better writing too. That's just my opinion though. Different people like different things
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