University students: do you think your uni education is value for money? Watch

Themysticalegg
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#21
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God mine became painful in 3 months I wanted to change but they said I had to repeat the year I was like
(Original post by kkboyk)
No it wasn't worth much tbh. It was the most painful thing for me and by the end of first semester of my final year I began to detest my course. In fact, at least 60% of people in my course felt the same (since most stopped showing up for lectures). Sure I've learnt a lot of mathematical concept and improved my analytical abilities, but it sure wasn't worth it.
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gjd800
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Mine definitely was. Spent years under the guidance of a couple of world-leading academics, banging on about religion, politics, ethics in seminars and generally having a good time.
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
God mine became painful in 3 months I wanted to change but they said I had to repeat the year I was like
What made it painful?
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Themysticalegg
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It was the course content to be honest, it wasn't for me. (Very waffly subject) And most of the lecturers were not particularly engaging. (I only chose Business because I didn't do very well in Science at A-level so it was a last minute change of mind. A snap decision like that isn't very likely to lead to enjoyment but it's over at least! )
(Original post by kkboyk)
What made it painful?
Last edited by Themysticalegg; 1 week ago
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Nint123
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Well the government is basically giving them away for free. So they hold no value
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
It was the course content to be honest, it wasn't for me. (Very waffly subject) And most of the lecturers were not particularly engaging. (I only chose Business because I didn't do very well in Science at A-level so it was a last minute change of mind. A snap decision like that isn't very likely to lead to enjoyment but it's over at lebast! )
Ah I feel you lool. The first few months were hard to decipher what some lecturer say, or even be motivated. Most of my lecturers in 1st yr didnt put any effort in teaching, and were so bad that we all had to complain.
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Princepieman
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nope.

i think the:
- access to opportunities
- brand association
- personal development and inevitable hurdles to overcome
- network of friends, mentors and acquaintances
- honing of extremely useful higher order life skills (e.g. problem solving, critical thinking, teamwork, communication etc)

are worth their weight in gold

the education is really only a nice to have unless you want to become a devoted academic
Last edited by Princepieman; 1 week ago
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Princepieman
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
The only value university has given me so far is the ability to apply for undergraduate internships.

That's it.

I'm learning more at work, whilst being paid a good amount than I have the past 2-years at university.
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She-Ra
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It sounds like you're getting a lot from the experience. Do you feel it becomes greater value for money and your expectations are currently being met because you're taking advantage of all the opportunities?
(Original post by CatusStarbright)
Personally I do overall. I have around 12-14 contact hours each week, and the lecturers are always on hand to give additional support if needed. I do Law, so online resources are pretty important (for finding cases, etc). My university has access to most, if not all, of the online legal databases for which the subscriptions are very expensive.

To get even more out of my degree, I'm doing a year abroad which is a very cheap way of living in a country for a year. At the moment I am also on a month-long summer school in France which the university is almost completely paying for.
What you've shared resonates so deeply with me. If you just go for the degree part you're likely to be a little disappointed but if you embrace extra-curricular opportunities you get so much more. Do you feel like you've grown more at university because of the latter?
(Original post by chelseadagg3r)
I think a lot of it depends on your expectations of uni and how much you get involved outside of the curriculum. For me, solely based on education, probably not. The access to equipment and resources is incredible and definitely helps bump up the value, but ultimately a lot of what we're learning we can easily learn online and you definitely don't need to come to university to study what I do and make a career in it. However, the access to support and other opportunities and access to the students Union and all that they offer does overall make it value for money, personally
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She-Ra
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The answer is because your course is cross-subsidising a more expensive course......

I'm sad to hear about your experience. Great lecturing is amazing, reading of a powerpoint is so awful - you're right, what is the point? Have you spoken to your uni about your experience?


(Original post by DrawTheLine)
Honestly? Really not so much. I've just finished my second year in forensic psychology. I've had no more than 12 hours contact time in a week (sometimes dropping down to 6 or 7) and lecturers who really don't seem bothered.

For one of my modules, an awful lot of lectures were cancelled for no apparent reason and just re-named as "self-study". Basically, we had to read through the powerpoint at home and make notes. If we got the same learning from that as a proper lecture, why even turn up to them if we can learn everything from the slides?

For that same module, we were supposed to have a 3 hour lecture every week. This rarely lasted more than 2 hours, mostly 1.5 hours. This made it seem like we were missing out because we were not getting the full contact time we should. Of course it was nice to not have to be lectured for 3 hours, but the frequency at which it occurred was alarming.

So many lectures just read out from the slides. Not adding any more info, just reading out loud what we could already read. What is the point in a lecture, then, if they're just going to read from the slides? I could have done a distance learning course and done the same from the comfort of my own home, where I don't have to pay rent or for food etc.

As for the availability of lecturers in office hours, this was pretty poor as well. A lot of the time emails would go ignored or replied to after a deadline has passed, which renders it pointless.

I hope I've made my point (sorry it turned into a bit of a rant!) about it not really being value for money. I'm paying £9,250 a year to read off the slides basically without much outside assistance or extra knowledge. I know university is about doing your own independent work, but I don't see why I am paying for someone to read words from a powerpoint when I could do that for free at home myself.
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CoolCavy
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Don't think many things are worth 9 grand a year tbh.
My course has 3D printers etc and good contact time but is it worth £50,000 in total obviously not.
Am only here to get a graduate design job, can't wait to leave the uni experience seems to revolve only around drinking, being loud and living messily.
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She-Ra
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So basically you're paying for the connection/ opportunity - that's the value. How are you feeling about going back in September?
(Original post by Blue_Cow)
The only value university has given me so far is the ability to apply for undergraduate internships.

That's it.

I'm learning more at work, whilst being paid a good amount than I have the past 2-years at university.
Oh I see! :blush:

Thank you for clarifying!
(Original post by -Eirlys-)
My whole degree costs £5-6k I mean, not per year! The price has risen but it's £1k per module. But yes, I think all degrees should be closer to the price of a car, not £20k+!
Can I ask you why? Why do you think a vocational course over something like history or English Lit is better value for money?
(Original post by stimtothesky)
Yes, for vocational courses like mine (vet med).
What was painful about it? The content, the way it was taught/ guided? What could have been done differently to meet your expectations and improve value for money?

(Original post by kkboyk)
No it wasn't worth much tbh. It was the most painful thing for me and by the end of first semester of my final year I began to detest my course. In fact, at least 60% of people in my course felt the same (since most stopped showing up for lectures). Sure I've learnt a lot of mathematical concept and improved my analytical abilities, but it sure wasn't worth it.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
With respect we are talking about tuition fees here and not living costs. That's another issue entirely.
Agree, could go on a whole tangent about how the maintenance loan is unfair....
Definitely has reduced my happiness with the uni experience as I have next to no money (rich but unsupportive father and i can't get a job no matter how hard I try) but that's not the unis fault it's a separate system by sfe
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She-Ra
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Your course is well connected with industry thought yes? Do you feel you've benefited from that?

Did you feel that you had to go to uni to get a design job?
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Don't think many things are worth 9 grand a year tbh.
My course has 3D printers etc and good contact time but is it worth £50,000 in total obviously not.
Am only here to get a graduate design job, can't wait to leave the uni experience seems to revolve only around drinking, being loud and living messily.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by She-Ra)
So basically you're paying for the connection/ opportunity - that's the value. How are you feeling about going back in September?
I'm paying for the ability to put down on an application form

"I'm studying at University of XYZ"

I've not made any meaningful connections as a *direct* result of university :nope:

How do I feel? One year closer to finishing, I suppose. :rofl:
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She-Ra
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Have you asked your employer whether your university made you a more favourable candidate? Do they tend to recruit from a similar batch of unis?
(Original post by Blue_Cow)
I'm paying for the ability to put down on an application form

"I'm studying at University of XYZ"

I've not made any meaningful connections as a *direct* result of university :nope:

How do I feel? One year closer to finishing, I suppose. :rofl:
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Have you asked your employer whether your university made you a more favourable candidate? Do they tend to recruit from a similar batch of unis?
Annecdotally, they don't seem to care. I have met interns from very different unis, ranging from Oxbridge to Oxford Brookes.

I think the ethos here is very much

If you've got potential
If you're going to be good at your job
If you're going to deliver results
If you pass the tests
If you raise the hiring bar
If the culture is for you

Then you're hired, no matter what uni you're from.
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JohanGRK
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Not value for money, but necessary + helpful in getting a high-paying job

Lectures worked out at an equivalent of £90 an hour or something
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She-Ra
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I wish all applicants were told this at school/ college. You reap what you sow.
(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Annecdotally, they don't seem to care. I have met interns from very different unis, ranging from Oxbridge to Oxford Brookes.

I think the ethos here is very much

If you've got potential
If you're going to be good at your job
If you're going to deliver results
If you pass the tests
If you raise the hiring bar
If the culture is for you

Then you're hired, no matter what uni you're from.
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Anonymous #2
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Is it valuable? Yes. Is it worth £9k? No.
I'm doing a very creative, hands on subject so what we learn we will need but I'm sure theres a YouTube tutorial on all of it. Unfortunately getting a job in this field is near impossible without a degree
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