University students: do you think your uni education is value for money? Watch

kkboyk
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(Original post by She-Ra)
What was painful about it? The content, the way it was taught/ guided? What could have been done differently to meet your expectations and improve value for money?
Mainly the lack of motivation from staffs, course structure was a mess (many modules overlapped and where close to being identical... though they've changed this now). There was lack of anything career related, compared to other courses within the same department.
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She-Ra
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Do you mind sharing what the degree is? It sounds like you didn't have much choice :confused:
(Original post by Anonymous)
Is it valuable? Yes. Is it worth £9k? No.
I'm doing a very creative, hands on subject so what we learn we will need but I'm sure theres a YouTube tutorial on all of it. Unfortunately getting a job in this field is near impossible without a degree
That's a shame. It can be so frustrating when structure is all over the place. What career related content would have been helpful. Or what did other courses have that you didn't?
(Original post by kkboyk)
Mainly the lack of motivation from staffs, course structure was a mess (many modules overlapped and where close to being identical... though they've changed this now). There was lack of anything career related, compared to other courses within the same department.
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Airmed
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My degree was absolutely not worth the money. I went from 12 hours of contact time in my first year to 6 hours in first semester of my final year to just 3 hours in second semester of my final year.

I've £37k of student loans to pay back for a degree that I could have learned on the internet. A degree that has only been useful for getting an internship and getting into my graduate scheme - but in no way has actually helped either of those things. I don't use my degree at all.
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by She-Ra)
The answer is because your course is cross-subsidising a more expensive course......

I'm sad to hear about your experience. Great lecturing is amazing, reading of a powerpoint is so awful - you're right, what is the point? Have you spoken to your uni about your experience?
Lots of us have tried, and they send out these feedback surveys at the end of every term where we voice our dislike for it, but they respond basically saying the lecturers know the best way to get information out to us etc. So it doesn't look like anything will change soon!
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stimtothesky
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Can I ask you why? Why do you think a vocational course over something like history or English Lit is better value for money?
A few reasons.

1) You have a lot more contact time (almost 9-5 lectures 5 days a week, compared to sometimes less than 12 hours a week) than other courses, which means you’re paying the same amount for more time from the uni and more content- you get more bang for your buck


2) Practical courses can’t be self taught (easily). With something like history or English lit you could self teach the content. It would be hard enough to self teach 3 years of pre clinical content to the required standard for vet med, but near impossible to self teach the core practical skills. Not many would trust someone who 'self taught' surgery to castrate their precious puppy, and I’d love to see someone self teach themselves to safely tip a naughty sheep. You’re getting something from your money you couldn’t get without paying.

3) You’re pretty much guaranteed a job that will be around for the entirety of your working life and will have a higher pay in that field than the job you could’ve got without the degree. With other degrees (business comes to mind), you could get an equally high pay without the degree. You’re paying for job security and to become a skilled worker.

4) You’re basically paying for RCVS (or equivalent) accreditation. You couldn’t get that without the degree.

Value for money is pretty irrelevant to the student anyway cause of student loans, it’s more about using your time as well as you can
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octo
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Honestly? I've had a lot of fun and gotten to learn some very interesting things --- but any undergraduate is kidding themselves if they think their education is value for money.
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by She-Ra)
It sounds like you're getting a lot from the experience. Do you feel it becomes greater value for money and your expectations are currently being met because you're taking advantage of all the opportunities?
I do actually, because things like this cost money and are opportunities that without being at university I would never have got to do. I've attended talks by academics at the top of their field, I've been taught by people leading their field. I've also done pro bono activities within the law school and I've done things with societies that I would never have normally done, such as learned to dance and entered negotiating and mooting competitions. I know that last point is not strictly related to my tuition fee, but it is all part and parcel of the university experience.

Furthermore, the careers support within our law school is truly excellent, and this year (my second year) I participated in the careers mentor scheme that is run each year. Essentially I got matched with an alumni who is working in an area I am interested in, and I found that connection pretty valuable.

In sum, yes a university education is a lot of money, but if you really try and make the most of your time there is pays off. I've already really developed as a person in the two years I have been at uni, both intellectually and in terms of softer skills such as confidence and the ability to make convincing arguments.

(Original post by CoolCavy)
Agree, could go on a whole tangent about how the maintenance loan is unfair....
Definitely has reduced my happiness with the uni experience as I have next to no money (rich but unsupportive father and i can't get a job no matter how hard I try) but that's not the unis fault it's a separate system by sfe
Absolutely. If my parents refused to support me then I'd be stuck with a maintenance loan that doesn't even cover my rent and I'm not convinced a part-time job would allow me to be comfortable. Not to mention that I don't have a lot of time to myself during term time as it is. Essentially I'd either not be able to afford university, I'd have to get a car and commute each day, or I'd be just getting by the whole time.
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chelseadagg3r
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(Original post by She-Ra)
It sounds like you're getting a lot from the experience. Do you feel it becomes greater value for money and your expectations are currently being met because you're taking advantage of all the opportunities?


What you've shared resonates so deeply with me. If you just go for the degree part you're likely to be a little disappointed but if you embrace extra-curricular opportunities you get so much more. Do you feel like you've grown more at university because of the latter?
Exactly this. I think a lot of applicants, maybe particularly for universities that are considered particularly academic, just aren't aware of all the other things universities have to offer and how valuable they are. It sometimes feels like there's a divide in people searching for the uni that will get them the best degree and people looking for the best fun unis, but I feel if your search and priorities sit closer to the middle of this you're going to come away with a really good and well rounded experience that ultimately will really help you to grow and develop as a person. I work in the university halls and it's amazing how much changes in students' first year at uni and how much they've grown and matured by the time they leave for the summer.

In my case, I'm a completely different person. Towards the beginning of my uni experience I gave an interview to an author about my experience of loneliness and my lack of direction, and I've just finished my second year and I know exactly what I want to do with my life and how to work towards making that happen. I've also developed amazing professional and personal relationships, achieved things I didn't think I was capable of, and grown and developed in every possible way with hugely positive results. If I hadn't been so involved with extra-curricular activities and volunteering etc then I definitely wouldn't be going into my third year as I am and I can say that for certain. Every day I stop and think about how happy I am now and how grateful I am for that. Coming to uni and sticking with it has been the best decision I've ever made, so for me it is overall great value for money
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Realitysreflexx
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But would you have gotten on to that graduate scheme without it? no then your degree was worth every penny over someone working at Tesco.
(Original post by Airmed)
My degree was absolutely not worth the money. I went from 12 hours of contact time in my first year to 6 hours in first semester of my final year to just 3 hours in second semester of my final year.

I've £37k of student loans to pay back for a degree that I could have learned on the internet. A degree that has only been useful for getting an internship and getting into my graduate scheme - but in no way has actually helped either of those things. I don't use my degree at all.
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Airmed
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
But would you have gotten on to that graduate scheme without it? no then your degree was worth every penny over someone working at Tesco.
I said it wasn't worth the money, didn't say it was worthless. There is a difference.
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Realitysreflexx
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I think it's totally worth it....I've had the opportunity to spend a year abroad on Southeast Asia and have learned alot. My thinking about alot of issues surrounding my subject are much more advanced and if you asked me to draw value from an academic article i could easily do so (especially in my field).

But maybe since business is more vocational of a degree that you can see helps you when reading the business section theres more tangible evidences to draw in society.

Ultimately it's the opportunity to get a job, apply for a masters and simply be able to state that i have a degree. (not quite finished yet heading into 3rd year now). But i wouldn't trade the experience for any amount of money tbh.

Let me also say that i am a mature student who lost his mother previously to returning to education and my age may make me more appreciative. All the dream roles i would have never been able to achieve i'm at least entry level qualified for. Also i think that if you head into uni with your dreams and maybe your age being a bit more mature you will get more out of it, since you see the purpose. People make the mistake of going to uni because that is what they are supposed to do. That's not why you should go...take a gap year relax and do some thinking first.
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Themysticalegg
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Mmmhmm it's a weird one I get what you mean. The degree in itself was not worth the money. The degree content and what we're taught mostly goes flying out the window once you work, I did Business and ended up in Business related internship + graduate scheme. Where I thought the theory might be relevant but it really wasn't and more based on learning on the job. The piece of paper (degree) gives us access to internships in order to gain a graduate job but a lot of this is done through our own hard work rather than from anything we learnt directly from the degree.
(Original post by Airmed)
I said it wasn't worth the money, didn't say it was worthless. There is a difference.
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Realitysreflexx
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Ahh fair enough...but that investment in yourself will pay dividends likely for the rest of your life, interesting to see in a longer term view. And it is interesting that you would have such an outlook since you seem to spend alot of time advising people on their next stage lol.
(Original post by Airmed)
I said it wasn't worth the money, didn't say it was worthless. There is a difference.
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Airmed
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(Original post by Themysticalegg)
Mmmhmm it's a weird one I get what you mean. The degree in itself was not worth the money. The degree content and what we're taught mostly goes flying out the window once you work, I did Business and ended up in Business related internship + graduate scheme. Where I thought the theory might be relevant but it really wasn't and more based on learning on the job. The piece of paper (degree) gives us access to internships in order to gain a graduate job but a lot of this is done through our own hard work rather than from anything we learnt directly from the degree.
This, yes. We wouldn't get considered for internships or grad schemes because one of the entry requirements is getting a degree, but most of the time you don't need a specific degree. Therefore it's your hard work and your experience that gets you there. The degree just opens the doors.
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Edminzodo
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Hey everyone :wavey:

This is a question that gets asked a lot, but based on the fact you might have just finished your first year, or about to graduate I wanted to ask

Do you think your uni education is value for money based on your experience?

Has it met your expectations?

Do you have any advice based on your experience for applicants who are making their choices now or beginning in September?

:heart:
If you make the most of everything, yes (i.e. go to all of your classes, evening lectures, visit the facilities and attend events). Otherwise, I guess it depends on how much you view university as an investment.

My motto going in was 'don't say no to anything' and it paid off in an excellent experience and a strong degree. I can't speak for everyone, however.
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Airmed
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Ahh fair enough...but that investment in yourself will pay dividends likely for the rest of your life, interesting to see in a longer term view. And it is interesting that you would have such an outlook since you seem to spend alot of time advising people on their next stage lol.
I don't know if it will. I've learnt more on in my work life than my academic life. I prefer the investment in my health and work-life balance is a better investment than my academics. It's not that interesting. I recognise that degrees are useful, but are useful for some people more than others.

I'll also note that I want to to back to do a masters at some point - but not to further my career, just for myself.
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RedGiant
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Ahh fair enough...but that investment in yourself will pay dividends likely for the rest of your life, interesting to see in a longer term view. And it is interesting that you would have such an outlook since you seem to spend alot of time advising people on their next stage lol.
What dividends exactly? Investing the same £36k+ in an S&P index fund or mutual fund would likely result in a much better return.
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Realitysreflexx
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Your unlikely to ever have £36,000 to invest in the S&P500, but besides that why the S&P why not the NASDAQ far higher returns. Your suggestion is as silly as it sounds. How would a working class individual, someone with no academic qualification or even an apprentice especially with the already extremely low UK wages when you take into account diminshed purchasing power due to Brexit ever have that much extra income. Unless you come from wealth already and just have £36,000 laying around this is a highly unrealistic. The idea is get a degree so you can sell your labour at a higher rate and then sure you can invest in markets, not negating the importance of owning equities but not likely to happen if your part of the gig economy or unskilled labour vein of society.
(Original post by RedGiant)
What dividends exactly? Investing the same £36k+ in an S&P index fund or mutual fund would likely result in a much better return.
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RedGiant
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Your unlikely to ever have £36,000 to invest in the S&P500, but besides that why the S&P why not the NASDAQ far higher returns. Your suggestion is as silly as it sounds. How would a working class individual, someone with no academic qualification or even an apprentice especially with the already extremely low UK wages when you take into account diminshed purchasing power due to Brexit ever have that much extra income. Unless you come from wealth already and just have £36,000 laying around this is a highly unrealistic. The idea is get a degree so you can sell your labour at a higher rate and then sure you can invest in markets, not negating the importance of owning equities but not likely to happen if your part of the gig economy or unskilled labour vein of society.
Exactly, nobody "has £36k" when they start university either. My question was what "dividends" are you talking about, investing it in S&P was just to illustrate my point, I'm not literally saying that an 18 year old should to try and invest money they don't have in the S&P.
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J’cruz
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What do you guys think about university of Strathclyde, Glasgow
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