Why do Uni's have Entry Requirements? Watch

The_Atomix
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What I mean by this is that, they all teach the same things. so why do they all have different requirements? r some of the things they teach easier or less diffucult than what other Uni's teach? isn't it the same topics? or is the uni just worse so it will also have lower requirements because they're teaching standards r not as good as other's? how do they come to the decision of what their grade requirements should be for a course? just curious.
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Drewski
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(Original post by The_Atomix)
What I mean by this is that, they all teach the same things.
No, they don't.

Subjects might have the same name, but that's where it ends.
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ecolier
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(Original post by The_Atomix)
What I mean by this is that, they all teach the same things. so why do they all have different requirements? r some of the things they teach easier or less diffucult than what other Uni's teach? isn't it the same topics? or is the uni just worse so it will also have lower requirements because they're teaching standards r not as good as other's? how do they come to the decision of what their grade requirements should be for a course? just curious.
Supply and demand.

See Medicine requirements in the 1970s / 1980s compared to now.
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PQ
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Look at the first year drop out/failure rates in non selective universities in Europe.
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The_Atomix
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I get its away to separate the smart kids from the "other" kids but I still don't think this is a valid reason to make requirements. they're arnt any form of requirements for secondary school, they put kids into sets to determine their intelligence. can't uni's do this. and secondary schools don't have mixed results, a school dependant on its teaching standards can suggest how good the school is. I hope I'm making sense because honestly when u really think about it they r basically unnecessary.
(Original post by PQ)
Look at the first year drop out/failure rates in non selective universities in Europe.
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ecolier
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(Original post by The_Atomix)
....
For Medicine (dentistry, vet, and many courses for Oxbridge), pure grades are no longer enough so admission tests are now administered to further differentiate candidates. There are also multiple mini interviews. I don't see how much fairer things can be for competitive courses. As I said, supply and demand.
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Smack
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Supply and demand, plus the courses at some universities may be a bit more academically challenging than others, and hence may require a higher standard of attainment at entry to ensure successful completion of the course (British universities don't generally have high drop-out rates).
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by The_Atomix)
What I mean by this is that, they all teach the same things. so why do they all have different requirements? r some of the things they teach easier or less diffucult than what other Uni's teach? isn't it the same topics? or is the uni just worse so it will also have lower requirements because they're teaching standards r not as good as other's? how do they come to the decision of what their grade requirements should be for a course? just curious.
They don't all teach the same things. Universities aren't like schools - they don't have a specification of what they need to teach. The modules within courses change yearly, and depend on the teaching staff and resources they have available. For example, my university course has a module about the paranormal and ghosts etc. They only have this because they have a few members of staff who research this stuff. If they left, so would the module.

They have entry requirements to make sure the students will be able to cope with the workload. Top universities are much more intense and work students harder than the lower-ranked unis, so they need to make sure students can cope with the workload. Also, as others have said, it depends on how many applicants they have and how many places they can offer. Entry requirements can go up or down each year depending on the stats.
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ecolier
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(Original post by DrawTheLine)
...paranormal and ghosts etc....If they left, so would the module.
Surely, if they passed away there'd be more teachers :getmecoat:
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by ecolier)
Surely, if they passed away there'd be more teachers :getmecoat:
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LeoVegas
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(Original post by ecolier)
For Medicine (dentistry, vet, and many courses for Oxbridge), pure grades are no longer enough so admission tests are now administered to further differentiate candidates. There are also multiple mini interviews. I don't see how much fairer things can be for competitive courses. As I said, supply and demand.
R u a doctor?
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ecolier
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(Original post by LeoVegas)
R u a doctor?
Why ask?
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WarwickMaths281
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Are you having a laugh? Do you really think that Oxbridge teaches exactly the same material as dumps like Huddersfield and Anglia Ruskin?
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OddOnes
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It's to prevent drop outs and keep performance rates up. Higher grades generally mean they will do well in the degree and not drop out (definitely not always the case).

Content is pretty similar across all uni's. But people who like to think they're special by going to a top 10 uni like to tell you otherwise.
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by OddOnes)
Content is pretty similar across all uni's. But people who like to think they're special by going to a top 10 uni like to tell you otherwise.
Which subjects are you referring to? Because there's some fairly clear evidence to the contrary for my course (law).
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gjd800
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
Which subjects are you referring to? Because there's some fairly clear evidence to the contrary for my course (law).
Yes, and for my discipline, too. I can count on one hand the amount of departments that cover my areas of Indian philosophy.
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PTMalewski
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(Original post by OddOnes)

Content is pretty similar across all uni's. But people who like to think they're special by going to a top 10 uni like to tell you otherwise.
It's unlikely, considering how specialized some disciplines have become. A hundred years ago, an engineer could do pretty much everything, now such a jack of all trades would be useless, things got far too complex.
Same with humanities, I doubt there is a philosopher who knows and understands all the major systems. It always makes me smile, when I recall Alfred Ayer's book, in which he comments that 'either I don't understand Wittgenstein or Wittgenstein didn't understand what he was writing'.

The capabilities of students themselves can also make a difference in the general opportunities that universities offer.
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The_Atomix
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unis can easily separate smarter students from the worse students easily by putting them in different classes. how ever there should be uni's for specific subject areas. if a uni is doing mathematics they can provide an entire range of easy and difficult topics for students based on their level. there r hundreds of subjects a student can learn I imagine with the variety of modules seen in degrees, but again, that's not really a reason to make requirements. if it only gives them a good name then its all some form of a business tactic. I'm not complaining about this because I have low grades and I'm jealous of smarter students, I am honestly curious about this. I thought that had to be said since im defending this idea so much. I hope I'm making sense as well.
(Original post by PTMalewski)
It's unlikely, considering how specialized some disciplines have become. A hundred years ago, an engineer could do pretty much everything, now such a jack of all trades would be useless, things got far too complex.
Same with humanities, I doubt there is a philosopher who knows and understands all the major systems. It always makes me smile, when I recall Alfred Ayer's book, in which he comments that 'either I don't understand Wittgenstein or Wittgenstein didn't understand what he was writing'.

The capabilities of students themselves can also make a difference in the general opportunities that universities offer.
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Tolgarda
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Some lower quality universities don't have the expertise to teach the content that the highest-quality universities teach. The quality of teaching is different, and so are the topics taught. As a result, the demand varies between universities, so entry requirements are in place to avoid an excess of drop-outs. Anyway, secondary schools do have entry requirements. Have you not seen the entry requirements for the London Academy of Excellence or Brampton Manor Academy?
(Original post by The_Atomix)
unis can easily separate smarter students from the worse students easily by putting them in different classes. how ever there should be uni's for specific subject areas. if a uni is doing mathematics they can provide an entire range of easy and difficult topics for students based on their level. there r hundreds of subjects a student can learn I imagine with the variety of modules seen in degrees, but again, that's not really a reason to make requirements. if it only gives them a good name then its all some form of a business tactic. I'm not complaining about this because I have low grades and I'm jealous of smarter students, I am honestly curious about this. I thought that had to be said since im defending this idea so much. I hope I'm making sense as well.
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Salostar
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WEach university is able to set the entry requirements for their courses, this, as mentioned by others, helps to identify prospective students capable of undertaking and completing the course. Not always foolproof of course, particularly where rote learning is involved for prior education or there are differing standards of opinion to what is considered acceptable.

It should also be noted that the entry requirements aren’t set in stone and are likely to be amended or alternatives as substitutes are considered - such as related experience, etc. This is commonly seen when applying as a mature student or for a masters course.
(Original post by PTMalewski)
The capabilities of students themselves can also make a difference in the general opportunities that universities offer.
A bit of a catch 22 really. I remember a conversation I once had with a department head about student quality, and how due to that particular universities ranking/reputation they struggled to attract many students who went beyond the minimum effort required to pass. Coupled with increasing student fees and the attitude of “I’m paying a lot of money for this, I deserve a good grade” he wasn’t hopeful that things would improve but likely to get worse. At least in the short term.
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