what do you think of people on benefits Watch

Pany5689
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thoughts on people who are on benefits who are more than capable of working and would actually be better off but choose not to?
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Rai258
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I don't
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Drewski
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Tiny minority that aren't worth bothering about.
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The Mogg
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If you don't want to work and are perfectly capable of doing so, and contribute to society and the economy, then society and the economy shouldn't contribute to you in the form of benefits.
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gjd800
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Other things to worry about.
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MysticImogen
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(Original post by Pany5689)
thoughts on people who are on benefits who are more than capable of working and would actually be better off but choose not to?
Everyone different
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Delusion6
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those types are usually the highly uneducated chavvy types. and lets be honest here who is going to employ people like them anyway? don't like it if they are CHOOSING this lifestyle but i do believe they are most definitely a minority. and they all seem to be housed in the same area so that helps a lot too. easier to avoid lol.
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iBearHQ
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(Original post by Mark mein words)
Scum. Simple as that. It is why unemployment benefits need to be eliminated. Remove the minimum wage at the same time and the market will supply the jobs for those that want them.
Don't agree about getting rid of minimum wage but people who take advantage of the system are scrum, i agree.
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NotNotBatman
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They are great people.
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cts_casemod
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Several things upset me:
That the rest of us have to pay higher council tax and other taxes to offset those that have it free.
That council houses have all the repairs done, with many homeowners barely affording a major loan to fix roof, for example.
Some people are permanently signed of work without regular checks (surely they can do something?) as everyone else.
Many students are struggling and get nothing and are told to go work or have to stop their studies
That higher earners who pay NI at a higher rate are given £350/month: Same as those on minimum wage, doing much smaller contributions, when they loose their jobs.

I don't have nothing against those that claim (in a way some are really smart), but I do have against how the government implements the system. Many other countries like Denmark favour people that actually want to increase their education and be useful to the society in a certain way.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Pany5689)
thoughts on people who are on benefits who are more than capable of working and would actually be better off but choose not to?
Don't you have to show that you're making an effort to apply for jobs to keep receiving benefits?
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PandaWho
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(Original post by cts_casemod)
Several things upset me:
That the rest of us have to pay higher council tax and other taxes to offset those that have it free.
That council houses have all the repairs done, with many homeowners barely affording a major loan to fix roof, for example.
Some people are permanently signed of work without regular checks (surely they can do something?) as everyone else.
Many students are struggling and get nothing and are told to go work or have to stop their studies
That higher earners who pay NI at a higher rate are given £350/month: Same as those on minimum wage, doing much smaller contributions, when they loose their jobs.

I don't have nothing against those that claim (in a way some are really smart), but I do have against how the government implements the system. Many other countries like Denmark favour people that actually want to increase their education and be useful to the society in a certain way.
You sure about that one?
Having grown up in a council house i promise you the council deffinately dont put money into the houses unless they DESPERATELY need it. They refit new doors and windows in my road, and when they took 1 window out they found it was only attatched by 1 screw... we also had no central heating as they wouldnt put a boiler in for us, and the internal doors were made of cardboard...

My sister currently lives in a council house and has just gone a year with no fence and has 2 small kids... her house also needs completely rewiring because the lights dont work... guess what the council wont do it!
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keptinside
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If someone can do something, he’d legit do it straight.
“I can do it, but I won’t” is just an excuse that one gives to make oneself feel better. Otherwise, there is an option that you’d boost yourself for a specific time and that doesn’t work all the time. You’re usually working on your average power to keep it equal. Drops are usually there, but it goes back to the average. You can’t have the peak for too long. So yea, in general, it’s incapability. If you’re to measure, you’re to measure with day to day rate, not peak rate nor drop rate.
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It's****ingWOODY
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As someone who works in a sector dealing with people who claim benefits, I've seen things from the other side of the coin. Honestly, a lot of people do this because the average job doesn't always pay better than claiming benefits does. I've seen small families with just one or two children where the family can't afford childcare, so naturally one parent has to stay at home, but the parent staying at home can't claim certain benefits or certain benefits like tax credits are reduced because one partner is working, and overall they'd be on the same money if both of them were on housing benefits and JSA that they would be on if one of the parents was working. Working doesn't always pay and I honestly don't blame some people for choosing not to bother, instead choosing to stay at home with their child/children.

People need to be given a positive incentive to want to work, such as the national minimum wage being increased and fewer reductions of benefits like working tax credits or housing benefits because one person in the household is working - changing the latter would actually potentially save the government money by getting more people back into work instead of claiming JSA and claiming full whack on other living benefits. Simply reducing living benefits does nothing except punish those who have an honest reason for not being in work.
Last edited by It's****ingWOODY; 4 days ago
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Napp
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(Original post by Mark mein words)
and the market will supply the jobs for those that want them.
Are you joking or do you seriously believe this tripe?
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commentsection
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I don't think about them tbh.

But if I had to give my honest input I'm just say they are at fault for allowing themselves to be in the situation where they have to rely on the government etc for money. 🤷*♀️

You drop outta school, work, home etc for what 🙃 drugs? Abuse? Conflict? Etc? 🥴🤷*♀️
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hagbardceline
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I am infinitely more concerned about the super-wealthy being able to hide billions of pounds in off-shore bank accounts when they should be paying tax on it. This is of far greater consequence than a few people claiming benefits.
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Tootles
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(Original post by It's****ingWOODY)
As someone who works in a sector dealing with people who claim benefits, I've seen things from the other side of the coin. Honestly, a lot of people do this because the average job doesn't always pay better than claiming benefits does. I've seen small families with just one or two children where the family can't afford childcare, so naturally one parent has to stay at home, but the parent staying at home can't claim certain benefits or certain benefits like tax credits are reduced because one partner is working, and overall they'd be on the same money if both of them were on housing benefits and JSA that they would be on if one of the parents was working. Working doesn't always pay and I honestly don't blame some people for choosing not to bother, instead choosing to stay at home with their child/children.

People need to be given a positive incentive to want to work, such as the national minimum wage being increased and fewer reductions of benefits like working tax credits or housing benefits because one person in the household is working - changing the latter would actually potentially save the government money by getting more people back into work instead of claiming JSA and claiming full whack on other living benefits. Simply reducing living benefits does nothing except punish those who have an honest reason for not being in work.
Agree completely.

There are also people like me, who are capable of working and want to work, but who can't actually find a job. Though I should add I'm not claiming at the moment.

When I was on UC, though, my work coach was really helpful, and seemed to completely understand the situation I was in - though he wasn't able to do any more than was his job. The frustrating thing is that they just give you money and tell you to look for work, rather than actively helping you get work.
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Obolinda
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I'd have to meet them first

Anyway, it's not only unemployed people who receive benefits.
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Burridge
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(Original post by Pany5689)
thoughts on people who are on benefits who are more than capable of working and would actually be better off but choose not to?
I don't condone what they do. I think they should be offered support in order to change their mindset. Where necessary, a carrot-and-stick approach, but its difficult to isolate these cases so that just isn't pragmatic.

However, I also recognise that these cases are rare and equate to a very small amount of expenditure. I wouldn't let a handful of cases taint my opinion of the welfare state, and neither should any of you!
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