Amethyst12
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I've done A Level English Lit and I'm considering a degree in American Literature with Creative Writing - I love writing, and it's my strongest skill, but I feel like a Creative Writing degree alone just wouldn't be respected enough. I'm predicted an A in Literature, but I can't decide whether I enjoy it enough to do a degree in it. I was wondering, those of you who are doing/have done Literature degrees - how does it differ from A Level? What's your degree like?
Also - anyone studying American Literature with Creative Writing at UEA? This is the course I'm interested in, so it would be great to hear what people think!
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e.m1002
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I actually found my degree to be easier than A-Level in some ways. You get more freedom on what you want to write on, although of course you do have set texts to read. However the texts are often from a wider range of genres and aren't always what you'd think of as classics. I found my degree way more enjoyable than my A-Level. I did English with Creative Writing too (albeit at a different uni) and I LOVED the Creative Writing elements. I had opportunities to transfer what I learned across both parts of the degree so it was extremely enjoyable.
(Original post by Amethyst12)
I've done A Level English Lit and I'm considering a degree in American Literature with Creative Writing - I love writing, and it's my strongest skill, but I feel like a Creative Writing degree alone just wouldn't be respected enough. I'm predicted an A in Literature, but I can't decide whether I enjoy it enough to do a degree in it. I was wondering, those of you who are doing/have done Literature degrees - how does it differ from A Level? What's your degree like?
Also - anyone studying American Literature with Creative Writing at UEA? This is the course I'm interested in, so it would be great to hear what people think!
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Amethyst12
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Wow, thanks! You've actually made me feel a lot better about the idea of doing a Literature degree, and I love that you found what you learned transferable across both parts of the degree.
(Original post by e.m1002)
I actually found my degree to be easier than A-Level in some ways. You get more freedom on what you want to write on, although of course you do have set texts to read. However the texts are often from a wider range of genres and aren't always what you'd think of as classics. I found my degree way more enjoyable than my A-Level. I did English with Creative Writing too (albeit at a different uni) and I LOVED the Creative Writing elements. I had opportunities to transfer what I learned across both parts of the degree so it was extremely enjoyable.
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Raffa1
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I did straight English Lit at university, but I knew a lot of people doing English and Creative Writing too. First year is very different from 3rd year in a degree, but I'll be general. I'll try to be unbiased!

These are some of the main differences in my experience between A-Level and Degree level English:
- you read LOADS more books in far less detail than at A Level. Where A Level was about depth and detailed analysis of individual texts, degree lectures and seminars are more about breadth.
- more essays. Like a lot more, and as you go through uni, the word count gets higher! Make sure you enjoy writing.
- more freedom. You get more opportunity to write on what YOU want to write on (within the scope of the module you're doing though).
- writing essays is different. You don't have to worry about hitting any assessment objectives. But you do have to write well, format well (write bibliographies and footnotes properly) and have one main, very clear and original argument.
- you get to try new things. In my first year I got to try medieval literature and loved it. By third year I chose only options that included medieval.
- you dont always get to choose what you want to do. At most unis, you dont get much choice over modules you do in first and second year. It's only in the third year you really get to make the decisions.

There are probably other differences but these are the main ones I can think of. Hope this helps!
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