Police force takes legal action over policy requiring new officers to have a degree Watch

z-hog
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Apolice force is taking legal action over the controversial policy requiring all new officers to have a degree qualification.

Lincolnshire Police is seeking a judicial review of the College of Policing scheme, which was introduced last year, arguing that it will place officers in the classroom rather than out on the front line.

Chief Constable Bill Skelly said if the scheme goes ahead he will have around 40 fewer officers available to deploy at any one time, which amounts of 10 per cent of his overall strength.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...-new-officers/

So it isn't only 'government cuts' that are running down police on the beat!
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the bear
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i do not think our Bobby On The Beat™ needs his head cluttered up with fancy ideas.
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Notoriety
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Why would they be in the classroom? They would just go to uni, graduate and then apply for the job.
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Good bloke
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It is a foolish policy, to be fair. Graduates joining the police will have an expectation of making career progress (i.e. up the ranks). The police force needs people who do not make progress in this way. We need experienced bobbies and sergeants, in post for decades and even if we didn't there just are not enough senior roles to fill. How can these conflicting aims be reconciled? They cannot be reconciled. The recruitment solely of graduates is a foolish idea.
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z-hog
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(Original post by Good bloke)
The recruitment solely of graduates is a foolish idea.
Well, the College of Policing would beg to differ and they will do so in court. Are you suggesting they're fools?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by z-hog)
Well, the College of Policing would beg to differ and they will do so in court. Are you suggesting they're fools?
They must be if they cannot see the obvious flaw.
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z-hog
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Why would they be in the classroom? They would just go to uni, graduate and then apply for the job.
Good question and one that I posed myself, he'll have his arguments to take to the courtroom. Could be for added effect but he does have a problem somewhere.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It is a foolish policy, to be fair. Graduates joining the police will have an expectation of making career progress (i.e. up the ranks). The police force needs people who do not make progress in this way. We need experienced bobbies and sergeants, in post for decades and even if we didn't there just are not enough senior roles to fill. How can these conflicting aims be reconciled? They cannot be reconciled. The recruitment solely of graduates is a foolish idea.
Most grads are mediocre and are not gonna aim for superintendent.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Most grads are mediocre and are not gonna aim for superintendent.
Of course. If 50% of people become graduates it does not say much for the overall standard. However, the role of the bobby is not a graduate role, and requires nothing in the way of higher education, no matter how devalued that education now is. Graduates who do not progress despite having incurred large loans to get that qualification, are going to be frustrated and leave, leaving us with no cadre of seasoned bobbies (the backbone fior e service).
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Of course. If 50% of people become graduates it does not say much for the overall standard. However, the role of the bobby is not a graduate role, and requires nothing in the way of higher education, no matter how devalued that education now is. Graduates who do not progress despite having incurred large loans to get that qualification, are going to be frustrated and leave, leaving us with no cadre of seasoned bobbies (the backbone fior e service).
It does require knowledge of law, professional rules -- so ability to learn is important. You need critical thinking -- which is honed through a degree. And to write somewhat well.

It should be noted non grads can enter the police and undertake a degree apprenticeship of sorts to get through this barrier. I imagine this is what the classroom is in reference to, but even still the young people are going to uni. Most going into the police will be from the new unis or ex polies -- at least that's the case for my local police force. People with PhDs in criminology who barely have the wits to understand PACE. Mediocre.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Notoriety)
It does require knowledge of law, professional rules -- so ability to learn is important. You need critical thinking -- which is honed through a degree. And to write somewhat well.
It has always required, and taught, knowledge of the law (which it will obviously have to continue to undertake) so the traditional recruit has managed it very well, and critical thinking skills on the high streets and baton lines of Britain are not in high demand (at least for the plods, which is what we are discussing). And there will not be many graduate-level essays written by the typical bobby. In any event, the standard of written English of the typical modern graduate is not high. So I believe you to be mistaken.
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OddOnes
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That explains the sudden influx of Policing degrees that have popped up at various universities.
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Qup
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I don't really understand why you would need a degree to arrest a person and throw them in a cell.

A vigilante could do the same thing, but "that isn't legal so that's also immoral... somehow~!"
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Napp
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It is a foolish policy, to be fair. Graduates joining the police will have an expectation of making career progress (i.e. up the ranks). The police force needs people who do not make progress in this way. We need experienced bobbies and sergeants, in post for decades and even if we didn't there just are not enough senior roles to fill. How can these conflicting aims be reconciled? They cannot be reconciled. The recruitment solely of graduates is a foolish idea.
On the other hand how do you feel about having a someone with a few GCSEs and a BTEC walking around the streets with a H&K?
Call me elitest but id rather they be somewhat more educated than that average teenager...
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(Original post by Napp)
On the other hand how do you feel about having a someone with a few GCSEs and a BTEC walking around the streets with a H&K?
Call me elitest but id rather they be somewhat more educated than that average teenager...
I am entirely happy. IThis has been the case for a very long time, very successfully, and it does not require a high level of education to understand how and when to deploy a weapon. I want my bobbies to be fit, healthy, of average intelligence, sensible, steady, reliable, able to follow appropriate instructions and able to absorb the information they are trained into. I see no need for knowledge of ancient history, high level mathematical or scientific skills or the ability to analyse an Anglo-Saxon text.
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(Original post by Napp)
On the other hand how do you feel about having a someone with a few GCSEs and a BTEC walking around the streets with a H&K?
Call me elitest but id rather they be somewhat more educated than that average teenager...
I am entirely happy. IThis has been the case for a very long time, very successfully, and it does not require a high level of education to understand how and when to deploy a weapon. I want my bobbies to be fit, healthy, of average intelligence, sensible, steady, reliable, able to follow appropriate instructions and able to absorb the information they are trained into. I see no need for knowledge of ancient history, high level mathematical or scientific skills or the ability to analyse an Anglo-Saxon text.

You'll be wanting squaddies to be graduates next.
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Napp
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(Original post by Good bloke)
I am entirely happy. IThis has been the case for a very long time, very successfully, and it does not require a high level of education to understand how and when to deploy a weapon. I want my bobbies to be fit, healthy, of average intelligence, sensible, steady, reliable, able to follow appropriate instructions and able to absorb the information they are trained into. I see no need for knowledge of ancient history, high level mathematical or scientific skills or the ability to analyse an Anglo-Saxon text.
Apparently not...
Maybe but on the other hand it would seem somewhat dubious to have someone with a btec in cooking or woodwork walking around with a firearm/taser.
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(Original post by Good bloke)
You'll be wanting squaddies to be graduates next.
Why would i want that? they generally dont carry weapons on the city streets.
I want the Officers to be.
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(Original post by Napp)
Apparently not...
Maybe but on the other hand it would seem somewhat dubious to have someone with a btec in cooking or woodwork walking around with a firearm/taser.
But you are insisting they have a degree in a subject like English or maths, or media studies, all of which are so much more useful?
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z-hog
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(Original post by OddOnes)
That explains the sudden influx of Policing degrees that have popped up at various universities.
Sounds like the assembling of a production line, conspiracy theorists will be circling above. Policing degrees at Uni, what can they possibly consist of? Teaching that shoplifting occurs as a result of societal oppression and discrimination only, that sort of thing?
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