LNAT-ability to improve through revisionpractice? Watch

Belle158
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#1
Hi, I have to sit the LNAT for both Glasgow and oxford (I’m definitely applying) and then also for Durham and Bristol both of which I’m considering. I have begun practice today just reading through the mark shepherd book to try to familiarise myself with the layout of the test. I haven’t taken a practice test yet so not sure whether I’ll do any good or not but before I take a yest I’m wondering whether the general consensus is that it’s all natural affinity for the test or it’s the amount of practice put in? If it’s a natural affinity and I don’t do well then really I should be reconsidering my uni choices for those that don’t require lnat so wanted to get a heads up. I’ve ordered a couple more books with practice questions in but anyone who has already sat the test and found practice and books helpful then I would be really grateful for any recommendations. Also possibly recommendations of other unis to look into (I’ve already got Queen’s Belfast on my list) that don’t require Lnat because open days will be passing by now as I need to apply by October for oxford. Thanks
0
reply
Haider_A
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 days ago
#2
In my opinion, it's definitely practice that helps you improve your LNAT score.

When I first started going through practice questions, it would take me a long time to read and get the general gist of a text; after doing it consistently, it became much easier to do in less time.

I wouldn't recommend investing in loads of different books for the LNAT; one simple question and answer book is all you need (I used "The Ultimate LNAT Guide) which is now has newer versions.
0
reply
JohanGRK
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 days ago
#3
Drop the crappy Shepherd book. Too easy.

What you could do is - as radical as it sounds - practice and see whether your score improves to the level expected by Oxford, instead of expecting people to come up with a theory for you
0
reply
anonymous1231231
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 days ago
#4
I’d say to get Arbitio if you can afford it. There aren’t a lot of reasonable/representative practice papers online that are much cheaper or free.
0
reply
tenacity
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 days ago
#5
When you do mark your practice tests, do not simply tot up your score and move on. Go over the answers you got wrong or guessed at and try to understand what was the difference. This will improve your verbal reasoning markedly more than simply doing lots of tests.

Read the LNAT chapter of Nick McBride's 'Letters to a Law Student' (5th edition if possible) several times.

Read the LNAT advice on the websites of the LNAT unis you are applying to. Search FOI requests etc. for details on what their marking process is, as it can differ.

Do some practice essays under timed conditions. I would separately suggest making some essay plans for other questions.

You mis-used the word 'affinity' twice in the OP; Oxford in particular will not warm to this sort of poor vocabulary.
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 days ago
#6
Affinity was used correctly.
0
reply
tenacity
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 days ago
#7
No, it wasn't. Affinity is most often used to describe a liking or attraction. In the context of what the OP was saying, it is clear they were referring to 'natural' aptitude or ability.

It may seem like a pernickety distinction, but when you are competing against the most articulate people in your generation careful use of English will affect your chances. Arbitio claims that 'communication' is one of three key areas assessed in the LNAT essay by both Oxford and UCL; I assume that sensitivity to language is relevant there.

https://www.arbitio.co.uk/guides/lnat_university_scores

(Original post by Notoriety)
Affinity was used correctly.
0
reply
Belle158
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#8
(Original post by Haider_A)
In my opinion, it's definitely practice that helps you improve your LNAT score.

When I first started going through practice questions, it would take me a long time to read and get the general gist of a text; after doing it consistently, it became much easier to do in less time.

I wouldn't recommend investing in loads of different books for the LNAT; one simple question and answer book is all you need (I used "The Ultimate LNAT Guide) which is now has newer versions.
Okay thankyou, I have already bought a few books but I probably won’t need any more. The others are practice question books anyway so working my way through should hopefully help. I think I’ll attempt one of the lnat website tests in a couple of weeks after doing some more practice and see how I do. If I find that I am really struggling with it after lots of practice I will have to re-evaluate my thoughts with regards to unis.
Thanks a lot
0
reply
Belle158
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#9
I’ve got more books coming so I will see how they compare. Practice is practice and I don’t think it will do any harm to look through this one before the others get here but thanks for the heads up that it may not provide an accurate representation of the level of difficulty of the actual test.
I wanted to know whether others found practice to help or not as I’ve heard both that it does and doesn’t because if so, I’m missing out on attending other open days. I will try one of the tests on the lnat website in a couple of weeks after some practice and if my score is poor I will see how practice changes it and may reconsider uni thoughts.
(Original post by JohanGRK)
Drop the crappy Shepherd book. Too easy.

What you could do is - as radical as it sounds - practice and see whether your score improves to the level expected by Oxford, instead of expecting people to come up with a theory for you
0
reply
Belle158
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#10
I’ve not heard of this before but I will look into it, Thankyou
(Original post by anonymous1231231)
I’d say to get Arbitio if you can afford it. There aren’t a lot of reasonable/representative practice papers online that are much cheaper or free.
0
reply
Belle158
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#11
Thanks a lot, this was really helpful.

(Original post by tenacity)
When you do mark your practice tests, do not simply tot up your score and move on. Go over the answers you got wrong or guessed at and try to understand what was the difference. This will improve your verbal reasoning markedly more than simply doing lots of tests.

Read the LNAT chapter of Nick McBride's 'Letters to a Law Student' (5th edition if possible) several times.

Read the LNAT advice on the websites of the LNAT unis you are applying to. Search FOI requests etc. for details on what their marking process is, as it can differ.

Do some practice essays under timed conditions. I would separately suggest making some essay plans for other questions.

You mis-used the word 'affinity' twice in the OP; Oxford in particular will not warm to this sort of poor vocabulary.
0
reply
Kali.kb
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 days ago
#12
I did the LNAT last year for 2019/2020 entry. There's no point investing in books, literally no point. You can't get taught how to think critically in relation to verbal seasoning, it just flows overtime.

I got 14 on the first ever paper I did and I couldn't afford to invest in a range of books and workshops so I used free resources and I ended up with 24 in the end.
0
reply
JohanGRK
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 days ago
#13
(Original post by Kali.kb)
I did the LNAT last year for 2019/2020 entry. There's no point investing in books, literally no point. You can't get taught how to think critically in relation to verbal seasoning, it just flows overtime.

I got 14 on the first ever paper I did and I couldn't afford to invest in a range of books and workshops so I used free resources and I ended up with 24 in the end.
I think that the point of investing in books is that they may contain PPQs :cool: But yeah, abstract bs about 'how to reason' is never something that appealed to me
0
reply
Arisapo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 days ago
#14
Firstly, if you don’t do well on the LNAT, it doesn’t mean you should reconsider if law is right for you or if you’re good enough — it’s a notoriously difficult test and will be unlike anything you’ve done before. People will score around 16/17 and still go on to do very well on their actual law degree.

As others have said, I wouldn’t bother with the books. You can definitely improve with practice but I’d say all you really need to do (and all I did) was do the two LNAT practice tests online and see how you do. They’re very accurate to the real thing and should give you a clear indication of how you’ll do.

Spending loads on books is unnecessary, while getting a tutor or paying £100 or something for a workshop is even more pointless.
0
reply
Kali.kb
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 days ago
#15
This is so true omg! It makes me so sad when people spend loads of money on books and workshops, there's so many free resources online that people can use instead of spending money.
(Original post by Arisapo)
Firstly, if you don’t do well on the LNAT, it doesn’t mean you should reconsider if law is right for you or if you’re good enough — it’s a notoriously difficult test and will be unlike anything you’ve done before. People will score around 16/17 and still go on to do very well on their actual law degree.

As others have said, I wouldn’t bother with the books. You can definitely improve with practice but I’d say all you really need to do (and all I did) was do the two LNAT practice tests online and see how you do. They’re very accurate to the real thing and should give you a clear indication of how you’ll do.

Spending loads on books is unnecessary, while getting a tutor or paying £100 or something for a workshop is even more pointless.
0
reply
Arisapo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 days ago
#16
(Original post by Kali.kb)
This is so true omg! It makes me so sad when people spend loads of money on books and workshops, there's so many free resources online that people can use instead of spending money.
I looked at one of the workshops and it was around £125 for an afternoon; that is absolutely insane when you consider there’s no guarantee they’ll actually increase your score.

You can definitely improve but I do feel it’s a bit you’re either good at it or you’re not kind of thing.

I sat mine and got 23 which I was happy with and only did 2 practice tests.

Didn’t even go to an LNAT uni in the end but still got offers - anything above 21 and you’ve done pretty well I’d say.
0
reply
tenacity
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 days ago
#17
(Original post by Arisapo)
I looked at one of the workshops and it was around £125 for an afternoon; that is absolutely insane when you consider there’s no guarantee they’ll actually increase your score.

You can definitely improve but I do feel it’s a bit you’re either good at it or you’re not kind of thing.

I sat mine and got 23 which I was happy with and only did 2 practice tests.

Didn’t even go to an LNAT uni in the end but still got offers - anything above 21 and you’ve done pretty well I’d say.
For the last admission cycle, anything under 23 is below average. For the OP, this is terrible advice. Successful Oxford applicants 'currently' score in the region of 29, and a score of 21 would almost certainly result in a pre-interview rejection. Durham is probably three or four less. Bristol is probably 23 or higher.

I don't think fee-paying services are worth it for the LNAT, but that isn't because you can't or shouldn't bother to prepare in other ways.
Last edited by tenacity; 4 days ago
0
reply
Kali.kb
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 days ago
#18
I saw that too and it stressed me out! I literally only did two 2 practice tests (the free ones on their website), read through the guidebook and watched Eve Cornwell's LNAT prep video and got 24 marks (when normally getting 14 and 16 marks respective)
(Original post by Arisapo)
I looked at one of the workshops and it was around £125 for an afternoon; that is absolutely insane when you consider there’s no guarantee they’ll actually increase your score.

You can definitely improve but I do feel it’s a bit you’re either good at it or you’re not kind of thing.

I sat mine and got 23 which I was happy with and only did 2 practice tests.

Didn’t even go to an LNAT uni in the end but still got offers - anything above 21 and you’ve done pretty well I’d say.
0
reply
Arisapo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 days ago
#19
(Original post by tenacity)
For the last admission cycle, anything under 23 is below average. For the OP, this is terrible advice. Successful Oxford applicants 'currently' score in the region of 29, and a score of 21 would almost certainly result in a pre-interview rejection. Durham is probably three or four less. Bristol is probably 23 or higher.

I don't think fee-paying services are worth it for the LNAT, but that isn't because you can't or shouldn't bother to prepare in other ways.
Oxford you’re probably looking at at least 28 I’d agree.

You’re entirely wrong about the others though. The average was 23 but people on here were saying they got offers from Durham with 15, someone into Bristol with 16 and someone into Nottingham with 17.

It’s just a small part of your application. Obviously doing well will help your chances but Durham won’t go “anything under 25 we won’t consider” as that’s clearly wrong.

You can definitely practice and boost your score, but just use free resources.
0
reply
Arisapo
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 days ago
#20
(Original post by Kali.kb)
I saw that too and it stressed me out! I literally only did two 2 practice tests (the free ones on their website), read through the guidebook and watched Eve Cornwell's LNAT prep video and got 24 marks (when normally getting 14 and 16 marks respective)
Exactly, people will get lured into spending huge amounts of money thinking it will improve their score but in reality you’re not going to go from 14 to 36 just because you took a LNAT workshop.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 31 Jul '19
  • Staffordshire University
    Postgraduate open event - Stoke-on-Trent campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 7 Aug '19
  • University of Derby
    Foundation Open Event Further education
    Wed, 7 Aug '19

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (146)
17.65%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (74)
8.95%
No I am happy with my course choice (487)
58.89%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (120)
14.51%

Watched Threads

View All