Anonymous469
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Hello everyone I know there has been a post similar to this one around 5 years ago but 5 years are a long period of time and some slight changes in how the system works could fatally affect the student if he was not in the loop. Anyways to make things short I'm planning to take Biology, Chemistry and mathematics as A levels in edexcel. I heard there has been a few changes made as of this year but I am planning to do my AS in January and A2 in summer all in the same academic year? So is it possible with those subjects to do as A levels in one year. I am not going to school but I did already organize a study group for each of the 6 different subjects with very good teachers that I was taught by them during my ig's. Resource-wise I believe that there would be no problem. So what does everyone think? Btw I am aspiring to become involved in the medical field when I go to college
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Anonymous469
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I am the one who has to apologize because I am planning to do it in one year and wasn't very clear in stating so. I don't think "is it possible with those subjects to do as A levels in one year." was very clear tbh myself so I edited the text and I believe it is more understandable. Anyways if anyone has any questions or needs further details relevant to the matter at hand don't hesitate to ask.
Thank you for taking the time to reply.
(Original post by absentcrucible)
I can only answer from a work load perspective, since i don't know about the boards/logistics of organising this. In my opinion, this is possible. But will be exceptionally difficult. You will have to be very very very self motivated. It sounds good in theory. But actually getting up with no structure to follow, will be an A Level of work in itself imo.

EDIT: My apologies I thought you meant 3 alevels in 1 year.
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artful_lounger
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What exam board are you referring to? It changes some things. The below assumes you are planning to apply to UK medical schools (and mostly assumes you are in the UK).

In England, the exam boards offer only linear A-levels, where the AS is not part of the A-level qualification (it's a standalone qualification) and you are expected to know all the "AS" material when sitting the full A-level exams. Additionally AS and A-level exams in England are now only offered in the summer session, and you can't take AS and A-level exams at the same time (nor do you need to, since the A-level exam contains all the content from the AS and supersedes that qualification).

Bear in mind if you're in England, most UK medical schools expect students taking linear science A-levels to also take the science endorsement (i.e. the practical sessions). These can be expensive, and it can be hard to find a centre which takes students for the external A-level exams because they are required to offer the science endorsement if they do.

In Wales, and for international A-levels, they are still modular and you may still be able to sit the AS exams all in one sitting in the January exam session and the A2 in the summer session. Any practical elements will be part of the A-level syllabus, however, and so you may need to undertake these as part of the course of study. I highly doubt you will be able to sit biology and chemistry A-levels without having done any labwork in the modular format (and as above for the linear format, you need to do it anyway to meet the requirements of UK medical schools)

Whether it's feasible to take all three subjects in a single year depends a lot on you. If you don't have any background in those areas, it's a tall order, particularly if you are having to review the GCSE material which is an essential prerequisite for the A-level content beforehand, it may be unrealistic to plan to take them all in one year.

However, is there a reason why you need to take them in a single year? Medical schools in the UK at least won't care whether you took them in the usual time frame (two years) or in a single year, as long as you get the necessary grades. If you're concerned about "starting late", the long and short of it is, don't be, and even if you are one more year is very little difference in the long run (compared to messing it up and taking 3+ more years if you end up needing to apply to graduate entry medicine).

I would suggest doing them in the usual time frame, if possible, and if you must get your qualification in a single year, you would be better off looking at Access to Medicine courses (assuming you are in the UK and applying to UK medical schools). Access to Medicine courses are only a single year long, are funded by advanced learner loans that get written off when you finish your degree, and include any relevant labwork etc.
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Anonymous469
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I am actually an international student and I was able to have some lab work experience through out last year which gave me a head start in AS biology and chemistry as for maths I was at top class in our school and so every now and then our teacher gave us some AS tasks and I found them really easy. Not to show arrogance though, I do understand that AS maths is challenging but eversince I was a child I was exceptional in maths. I hope you don't take a bad impression of me thinking I'm arrogant and think I'm the best but I just want to state that I already have a headstart over other students in on the subject and would like to hear what you think about what I just said if it gives me light at the end of the tunnel as well as increase my chances of being able to achieve my target grade which is A*A*A or as for a minimum of A*AA. It is a first time hearing about "access to medicine" I will have to do some research on that matter but I am an international student who does not study in England but studies the British curriculum. The board which I am planning to sit my examinations in is Edexcel. I am really shoot to hear that international students can still do the AS and A2 in different periods which does decrease the stress significantly as well as helps me adjust my priorities a little.

Thank you for taking the time to help.
(Original post by artful_lounger)
What exam board are you referring to? It changes some things. The below assumes you are planning to apply to UK medical schools (and mostly assumes you are in the UK).

In England, the exam boards offer only linear A-levels, where the AS is not part of the A-level qualification (it's a standalone qualification) and you are expected to know all the "AS" material when sitting the full A-level exams. Additionally AS and A-level exams in England are now only offered in the summer session, and you can't take AS and A-level exams at the same time (nor do you need to, since the A-level exam contains all the content from the AS and supersedes that qualification).

Bear in mind if you're in England, most UK medical schools expect students taking linear science A-levels to also take the science endorsement (i.e. the practical sessions). These can be expensive, and it can be hard to find a centre which takes students for the external A-level exams because they are required to offer the science endorsement if they do.

In Wales, and for international A-levels, they are still modular and you may still be able to sit the AS exams all in one sitting in the January exam session and the A2 in the summer session. Any practical elements will be part of the A-level syllabus, however, and so you may need to undertake these as part of the course of study. I highly doubt you will be able to sit biology and chemistry A-levels without having done any labwork in the modular format (and as above for the linear format, you need to do it anyway to meet the requirements of UK medical schools)

Whether it's feasible to take all three subjects in a single year depends a lot on you. If you don't have any background in those areas, it's a tall order, particularly if you are having to review the GCSE material which is an essential prerequisite for the A-level content beforehand, it may be unrealistic to plan to take them all in one year.

However, is there a reason why you need to take them in a single year? Medical schools in the UK at least won't care whether you took them in the usual time frame (two years) or in a single year, as long as you get the necessary grades. If you're concerned about "starting late", the long and short of it is, don't be, and even if you are one more year is very little difference in the long run (compared to messing it up and taking 3+ more years if you end up needing to apply to graduate entry medicine).

I would suggest doing them in the usual time frame, if possible, and if you must get your qualification in a single year, you would be better off looking at Access to Medicine courses (assuming you are in the UK and applying to UK medical schools). Access to Medicine courses are only a single year long, are funded by advanced learner loans that get written off when you finish your degree, and include any relevant labwork etc.
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