What do you think the university of the future will look like? Watch

The Learn Ranger
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Not next year but maybe 10 or 20 years away ....

Maybe fully online, cutting out the need to move away from home and the expenses associated with that?

Or would this eliminate all the academic, cultural and social benefits of studying at a physical university?

Is there potential to study modules at different universities across the world, dropping in and out whenever it suits you?

Or will universities become increasingly elitist, for the monied few while the rest of the population does apprenticeships or their future equivalent?

What do you think?
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Afterlife?
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It will be exactly the same even 20 years later maybe there will be a reformed grading system but I don't think the higher education culture will change too much
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The Learn Ranger
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What's your reason for that view? Surely technology can change a lot about the way university is experienced?
(Original post by Afterlife?)
It will be exactly the same even 20 years later maybe there will be a reformed grading system but I don't think the higher education culture will change too much
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KJEKJE Says Hi
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From someone who has yet to go to uni and experience it, I don't really know enough to make a full prediction.

However, as more people opt for the degree apprenticeship route, universities will find it more and more difficult to get students in. This means less money is being given to the unis to actually maintain standards academically, and therefore lecturers could also face redundancies or wage cuts. It also begs the question, with less students going, will tuition fees increase?

The troubling scenario I could imagine is the current 'Academy' style thing going on already in primary and secondary schools, where unis that are struggling financially will be forced to join with more successful unis. Ok, not necessarily a big problem, but what does that make of the individuality of those struggling unis? There's the worry of course dilution because of this, and a risk of having one uni having a monopoly and controlling that sector.

That is a bleak scenario I see, but I'm always optimistic of what could happen in the coming years. With universities continuing to build new facilities and encourage new societies, it may be enough to keep students going to university. It really depends on how the money gained from uni is spent, what courses are cut and kept, and technically also how students can get enrolled in the first place.

I think it also depends what students want to get out of uni. If it's solely for the degree, then an electronic approach would be quicker and efficient. However, if uni to most is for the experience, then we're more likely to see a bigger emphasis on the facilities and opportunities you can find in uni and nowhere else.

One thing's for sure, there will be more routes available for people to broaden their knowledge and go through higher education after school, simply because our current system isn't sustainable.

But who knows? Perhaps my perspective will change once I have truly experienced university. ^^
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Afterlife?
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(Original post by The Learn Ranger)
What's your reason for that view? Surely technology can change a lot about the way university is experienced?
Education has been super static the past hundreds of years so 20 years will see barely any change. You will still sit in lecture hall and tutorial and do homework and take exams
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JohanGRK
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Νothing

The MOOC hype is so 2010
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Themysticalegg
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I'll let you know in a few months time what I think. I did an undergraduate through the standard route but my Masters is fully online distance learning which suits the flexibility I need to do one whilst working. It may also save a person a lot of money as there is no maintenance. (Unless you choose certain courses at certain universities where the fees are high such as Imperial Business Analytics for £28,300 ) I believe more online courses will become available however I think the standard route will still be the norm in the future.
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by Afterlife?)
It will be exactly the same even 20 years later maybe there will be a reformed grading system but I don't think the higher education culture will change too much
I'm minded to agree with this. Lots of things might be able to change but that doesn't necessarily mean they will. Potentially lectures will be delivered remotely and exams typed rather than written, but that's the sort of change I think is likely. Partly because the experience of being on-site at a university will be what most people prefer, though there might be more distance-learning for those who don't want that.

I guess it's possible that there'll be more collaboration between universities, more courses taught by a combination of universities in multiple countries, more exchanges and more twinning. But perhaps the winds of change won't blow in that direction either...
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3121
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(Original post by The Learn Ranger)
Not next year but maybe 10 or 20 years away ....

Maybe fully online, cutting out the need to move away from home and the expenses associated with that?

Or would this eliminate all the academic, cultural and social benefits of studying at a physical university?

Is there potential to study modules at different universities across the world, dropping in and out whenever it suits you?

Or will universities become increasingly elitist, for the monied few while the rest of the population does apprenticeships or their future equivalent?

What do you think?
Open University already does this, I think it's worth it. The reason universities had reputation was because of their resources, library, research, etc. In the 80's and 90's with publications, book access became wider and researches were published and becoming easier to find.

Now with the internet, almost all books and published research can be found online, library's aren't unique (what I find in Oxford will probably be found at York or Bristol, if not I can easily source it online. What made oxford so special was the information there could only be obtained if you were a student), teaching has always been about the individual in higher education, lectures involve minimal teaching techniques compared to classrooms. So the concept of university is very outdated and can easily be replaced by technology since no one has control over information

The only thing making universities unique/prestigious today are their employment/industry links and examination credibility
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JamesManc
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I don't think there will be universities in the future, except maybe as hubs or robotics and AI. Or special universities as some kind of nostalgic historical reenactment society, for those missing 'the old ways.' Education will become redundant as AI and robotics do everything much better than humans could (if America and China don't have a nuclear war before).
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Smack
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This is an interesting question. A few months ago I was at an event with various speakers, one of them a lecturer at one of the local universities. The topic of the event wasn't about higher education, but it did come up. One of the interesting things he mentioned was that in the future, the biggest competitors to universities may well be private businesses rather than other universities.

How much do I agree with that? I don't know, but I do think that industry will make more forays into further and higher education, in various forms.

There has been talk recently about universities becoming MOOCs. This hasn't really happened yet (has the Open University had a large increase in applications to suggest that there is a demand for it?). But just because it has not happened yet, does not mean it won't happen in the future. For example, look how quickly dating apps have revolutionised relationships in a relatively short period of time.

Ultimately I think changes will be largely driven by student demand. What students demand will likely be driven by how what they value from a university education: the education, the experience, the certificate. That however is a very active debate today and I don't know the answer.
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steamed-hams
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I think fewer UK students will want to go to university and this would be catastrophic
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Future Physics
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I'd rather it stays the same and I don't think just studying on a computer all the time and reading books will be as beneficial as being around peer members, using the workshop/lab/specialist facilities and being physical instead of being cooped up in a bedroom all the time. There are also clubs and societies which can be better experienced in the real world then in a virtual environment and I feel that overall, university is better under the current system which I think people will agree that it is not always perfect but it is definitely better then fully online based.

I think one university already allows you to study modules that are normally at different universities which I believe to be Imperial. Don't take my word for it.
(Original post by The Learn Ranger)
What's your reason for that view? Surely technology can change a lot about the way university is experienced?
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Future Physics)
I think one university already allows you to study modules that are normally at different universities which I believe to be Imperial.
The University of London colleges have been doing this for ages (albeit not with all of their undergraduate programmes).
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Future Physics
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Yes they do, I have a friend that goes there.
(Original post by JohanGRK)
The University of London colleges have been doing this for ages (albeit not with all of their undergraduate programmes).
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ltsmith
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lots of them will have gone bankrupt.

10/20 years: degree apprenticeships and online degrees will be the norm. med/dental schools and other fields of study which require physical attendance will not have changed much. perhaps a doctor/surgeon degree apprenticeship will be proposed like the new solicitors degree apprenticeship that we have today.

80/100 years from now: most fields will have been automated away and a 'universal basic income' will have been introduced. we will be able to download knowledge into our minds (download a CS degree or a medical degree and you have the knowledge of a software engineer or a doctor).
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