Koalifications
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I will be starting A-levels in Politics, History and Economics in September, and have been given some reading lists for these subjects. However, I really don't like reading and find that not only do I get bored and also forget what I've read and have to keep re-reading paragraphs, but I constantly have to stop to search up a word. So, do you need to read extra books for A-levels to get into a good uni? Should you take notes about the books you read as you go along so you don't forget? Advice needed!
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cheesecakelove
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(Original post by Koalifications)
I will be starting A-levels in Politics, History and Economics in September, and have been given some reading lists for these subjects. However, I really don't like reading and find that not only do I get bored and also forget what I've read and have to keep re-reading paragraphs, but I constantly have to stop to search up a word. So, do you need to read extra books for A-levels to get into a good uni? Should you take notes about the books you read as you go along so you don't forget? Advice needed!
Summer reading for A-Levels doesn't have a direct effect on your university options. It is usually suggested to help you gain a little prior understanding before you undertake your A-Level subjects. Try to set aside some time and complete your reading in short chunks of time, taking small breaks in-between. It is usually a good idea to take notes so you can remember what you have read, and if you have any other thoughts or questions about certain sections, you can mark this down to raise in discussion with class or ask your teacher for more clarification. You won't usually need to read everything on the reading list (unless directed) but pick one or two and have a look.
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daniellesydney
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Obviously, if you've been instructed to read the stuff on your reading list (i.e. it's compulsory), then I'd recommend that you do read them (cheesecakelove's advice is definitely the way to go).

If it's entirely optional and you don't like reading, then you could consider trying to find:
a) summaries (or detailed reviews) of the book (however, these often don't go into a lot of depth)
b) documentaries/videos/podcasts by the authors of the books on the same topic (e.g. Freakonomics for Econs)
c) newspaper articles/documentaries/videos/podcasts that discuss the same topics as the assigned books (e.g. Crash Course YouTube videos, Philip Allan magazines).

...it all kind of depends on exactly what you've been told to do. Good luck!
Last edited by daniellesydney; 6 months ago
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lekveishvili
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Hello, i really want to pass A level religious studies and history of art exam. I have some question. In religious studies how many books should i cover, how many of them are compulsory? And do i have to choose which of them i want to learn? And about history of art? Does this subject have a book like all the other subjects? What book should i use to pass this exam? Thank you very much for your time.
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