2:1 Mathematics Graduate can't get a grad scheme/entry job Watch

Lost Paradigm
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Graduated a year ago from a Russell Group uni with a 2:1 I've been constantly applying for entry level jobs and grad schemes with not a single offer. Sometimes I've made it all the way through to the assessment centre stage and then I get rejected at the last hurdle.

The truth of the matter is that these organisations and companies are incredibly selective and there's no shortage of graduates. I've shed blood, sweat and tears into some of these applications. Reviewed my CV extensively, changed my approach numerous times, no difference. And also feedback is very basic and generic if I even get feedback at all "We didn't feel you performed well enough in comparison to other candidates" etc. I know people are going to say the same thing "You'll find something", "Try applying for other jobs" but you don't understand the whole situation.

Honestly, there's less requirements/qualifications to become Prime Minister. Unless you're the best of the best, these companies won't take you. In this day and age, it's extremely difficult for even graduates to get jobs. I've know people with Master's degrees in Physics that are working in coffee shops. Going to uni for 3 years and ending up in 30 grand worth of dept is just not worth it at all
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OhGod
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
Graduated a year ago form a Russell Group uni with a 2:1 I've been constantly applying for entry level jobs and grad schemes with not a single offer. Sometimes I've mad it all the way through to the assessment centre stage and then I get rejected at the last hurdle.

The truth of the matter is that these organisations and companies are incredibly selective and there's no shortage of graduates. I've shed blood, sweat and tears into some of these applications. Reviewed my CV extensively, changed my approach numerous times, no difference. And also feedback is very basic and generic if I even get feedback at all "We didn't feel you performed well enough in comparison to other candidates" etc. I know people are going to say the same thing "You'll find something", "Try applying for other jobs" but you don't understand the whole situation.

Honestly, there's less requirements/qualifications to become Prime Minister. Unless you're the best of the best, these companies won't take you. In this day and age, it's extremely difficult for even graduates to get jobs. I've know people with Master's degrees in Physics that are working in coffee shops. Going to uni for 3 years and ending up in 30 grand worth of dept is just not worth it at all
Should have played it safe and done Media Studies not mathematics.
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by OhGod)
Should have played it safe and done Media Studies not mathematics.
Maybe I should have to be honest. Unless one is planning to become a teacher, Mathematics itself it's a really pointless subject to study at University unless you're going to combine it with programming/coding.
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DuckDodgers
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I agree that grad schemes are too competitive but what's your work experience like? I personally think those physics graduates are playing the smart game by using that job as a way to build their skills. Unless they have zero ambition, they won't be baristas in a few years time as they'll likely be applying the same skills they've developed in a much better job.
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by DuckDodgers)
I agree that grad schemes are too competitive but what's your work experience like? I personally think those physics graduates are playing the smart game by using that job as a way to build their skills. Unless they have zero ambition, they won't be baristas in a few years time as they'll likely be applying the same skills they've developed in a much better job.
I've actually got some previous working experience in admin but it doesn't seem to be doing any favours, it actually get's overlooked 90% of the time.
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desou
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What job-specific skills did you develop over your time at uni? Are you a dominant coder? Can you hold a room? Can you immediately spot the holes in an argument even in a subject you're only vaguely familiar? Do you have A1 presentation game? Can you wire a plug? Can you smash out 20,000 grammatically perfect and coherent argued words on any subject in under a week? Can you google?
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by desou)
What job-specific skills did you develop over your time at uni? Are you a dominant coder? Can you hold a room? Can you immediately spot the holes in an argument even in a subject you're only vaguely familiar? Do you have A1 presentation game? Can you wire a plug? Can you smash out 20,000 grammatically perfect and coherent argued words on any subject in under a week? Can you google?
I can fly. Is that good enough for you?
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desou
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
I can fly. Is that good enough for you?
If you have a private pilots licence why not apply for a airline?
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by desou)
If you have a private pilots licence why not apply for a airline?
It was a joke. In all seriousness, university didn't really prep me with job specific skills. I got those from past working experience in admin, communicational, analytical etc. But like I said it doesn't do much favours when it comes to grad schemes. I can't code unfortunately, I'm not particularly interested in a role that involves coding/programming. I mean If it's a doll house then sure but if you mean a normal room then that's a little too heavy for me. I'd like to think I can quickly process and understand arguments, but I like to take points in a manner of perspective rather than who's right and who's wrong. Well I prefer A4 presentation papers. When the CEO of the organisation I will be working for can "smash out 20,000 grammatically perfect and coherent argued words on any subject in under a week" then I'll be able to do 50,000.
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desou
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
It was a joke. In all seriousness, university didn't really prep me with job specific skills. I got those from past working experience in admin, communicational, analytical etc. But like I said it doesn't do much favours when it comes to grad schemes. I can't code unfortunately, I'm not particularly interested in a role that involves coding/programming. I mean If it's a doll house then sure but if you mean a normal room then that's a little too heavy for me. I'd like to think I can quickly process and understand arguments, but I like to take points in a manner of perspective rather than who's right and who's wrong. Well I prefer A4 presentation papers. When the CEO of the organisation I will be working for can "smash out 20,000 grammatically perfect and coherent argued words on any subject in under a week" then I'll be able to do 50,000.
A 2:1 in a somewhat esoteric degree with no discernible job-specific skills and a bit of an attitude problem. I see your difficulty.

What kind of job do you want to do?
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OhGod
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
Maybe I should have to be honest. Unless one is planning to become a teacher, Mathematics itself it's a really pointless subject to study at University unless you're going to combine it with programming/coding.
Do a computer science conversion course?
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by desou)
A 2:1 in a somewhat esoteric degree with no discernible job-specific skills and a bit of an attitude problem. I see your difficulty.

What kind of job do you want to do?
Well I do apologise but I thought the whole idea of graduate schemes and entry level roles were for recent graduates who haven't held past jobs to gain experience and "discernible job specific skills". Otherwise would I not be applying to mid to senior level roles, obviously?
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OhGod
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
Well I do apologise but I thought the whole idea of graduate schemes and entry level roles were for recent graduates who haven't held past jobs to gain experience and "discernible job specific skills". Otherwise would I not be applying to mid to senior level roles, obviously?
There’s not enough graduate jobs
so you can’t walk into a graduate job with no experience unless you did a very vocational degree. It’s not the 1980s anymore.
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by OhGod)
There’s not enough graduate jobs
so you can’t walk into a graduate job with no experience unless you did a very vocational degree. It’s not the 1980s anymore.
I agree but even with past working experience it seems to make little to no difference. I'm working part time in admin at the moment and I've spoken about that on my CV and when I apply to positions and the skills etc. I've gained from it. Applications to intern and even summer placements end with the same result, it's just what I and a lot of others are experience at the moment and I actually live in London.
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desou
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
Well I do apologise but I thought the whole idea of graduate schemes and entry level roles were for recent graduates who haven't held past jobs to gain experience and "discernible job specific skills". Otherwise would I not be applying to mid to senior level roles, obviously?
lol, no. You need far more than a basic range of "discernible job specific skills" to reach a mid to senior level.

Rather than moaning, the question you have to ask yourself is, what distinguishes you from the next in line? You don't have a 1st, you don't really have any bankable skills, you don't seem to even have much interest in what type of job it is that you're applying for, so what do you have to offer than the company is actually going to want?
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OhGod
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
I agree but even with past working experience it seems to make little to no difference. I'm working part time in admin at the moment and I've spoken about that on my CV and when I apply to positions and the skills etc. I've gained from it. Applications to intern and even summer placements end with the same result, it's just what I and a lot of others are experience at the moment and I actually live in London.
Have you considered going into finance/investment banking?
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by desou)
lol, no. You need far more than a basic range of "discernible job specific skills" to reach a mid to senior level.

Rather than moaning, the question you have to ask yourself is, what distinguishes you from the next in line? You don't have a 1st, you don't really have any bankable skills, you don't seem to even have much interest in what type of job it is that you're applying for, so what do you have to offer than the company is actually going to want?
I'm not here to debate or argue with you, I'm sharing my experience. Quite clearly you have all these high expectations about what someone should be and incase you haven't figured that out yet, that's not me. I'm not going to pretend I'm some kind of gods gift that can perform miracles for the company I work for, so how about you go ramble elsewhere about what a dream employee is.
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Lost Paradigm
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(Original post by OhGod)
Have you considered going into finance/investment banking?
Yes, I'm currently reading to take some professional qualifications in finance. A lot of positions related to finance, accounting and investment banking are heavily reliant on professionals quals in the field which are very, very tough. But I'm considering a wide range of different roles at the moment analytical, consulting, project management etc.
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GreenCub
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
Maybe I should have to be honest. Unless one is planning to become a teacher, Mathematics itself it's a really pointless subject to study at University unless you're going to combine it with programming/coding.
This is very much not true. Out of all the degrees that are offered by universities, only a very limited selection are directly relevant to a career (medicine, law, engineering...) and you certainly don't have to study one of these subjects to be employable or everybody would be a doctor or engineer.

(That said, computer science graduates have a lower employment rate six months after graduating than many other degrees, despite the fact that it's viewed as a degree with which it is easy to find a job.)

You should not expect to get a job straight out of uni without any experience - a degree is not a guaranteed ticket to a well paying job. In addition, just being at any RG university doesn't guarantee anything - companies tend to head to the very best of the best universities to recruit graduates.

Have you looked into finance?
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desou
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(Original post by Lost Paradigm)
I'm not here to debate or argue with you, I'm sharing my experience. Quite clearly you have all these high expectations about what someone should be and incase you haven't figured that out yet, that's not me. I'm not going to pretend I'm some kind of gods gift that can perform miracles for the company I work for, so how about you go ramble elsewhere about what a dream employee is.
What an horribly self-entitled, defeatist attitude. You can't get a job and you're not willing to change a single thing to make yourself more employable.

You sound ideal for the financial sector. Enjoy the 70-hour working weeks until you have a nervous breakdown in a few years time.
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