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juren98
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I'm a current law student at LSE and I'm happy to give you honest answers about the good and the bad so ask away.
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LLMinUK
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tell us about the bad stuff, please
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Deggs_14
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(Original post by juren98)
I'm a current law student at LSE and I'm happy to give you honest answers about the good and the bad so ask away.
Hi there - how are you managing finances with high London rent and living costs in comparison to the rest of the country?
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juren98
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Ok there are definitely some bad things about LSE but I just want to begin by saying that I do enjoy studying here and I think the benefits do outweigh the negatives for most people.

1. Our reputation for being the toilet of student satisfaction precedes us and there are definitely issues with collegiality but that is largely just part of being a city uni where nobody lives on campus. There are also problems with a lack of mixing between groups of students from different countries which is obviously more of a problem at LSE where there are so many internationals but I've personally not found that much of a problem especially within my department or societies.

2. The campus is overcrowded and although the uni is working to expand these projects obviously take years and all the building work (which has been a constant since I've been here) has actually further limited the amount of space we have. LSE has also been increasing the numbers of students it has been taking which doesn't help although I think they've frozen intake numbers for the time being, may be wrong on that. The library gets notoriously busy in spring, is not air conditioned in most spaces, has a pretty serious mouse problem and is also quite loud from the aforementioned construction work.

3. I've heard people say that the teaching quality isn't great, I've personally never found that but some departments do have a tendency to rely on grad teaching assistants who may be knowledgable but aren't always very good at actually teaching. The quality of the lecturers and the overall courses has always been really good though.

4. The LSE is known amongst students for being pretty poor at admin, there have been some issues with results release dates being pushed back repeatedly in the past. The less said about the LSE students union the better, it's highly inefficient and unrepresentative but you can generally avoid having much to do with it so it's not too much of a problem.

I hope that helps, if you have any more questions please feel free to ask.
(Original post by LLMinUK)
tell us about the bad stuff, please
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juren98
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
Hi there - how are you managing finances with high London rent and living costs in comparison to the rest of the country?
It's definitely tough, London is a very expensive place to live. Obviously the further away from zone 1 you live the cheaper the rent generally is but then the more expensive and mind numbing your commute becomes. LSE accommodation is generally cheaper than living anywhere privately on your own although if you share it can bring the cost down. Catered accommodation definitely works out cheaper than eating out or cooking for yourself everyday which I've found can get pretty depressing after a while.

In terms of living costs there's lots of tips and life hacks out there but I'd just say try to plan ahead in terms of buying food etc because when you order it from a supermarket you're not paying the local store prices you'd get in London, find out where you can use student discount because it can be very reasonable sometimes to eat out with it and just try to make as much stuff at home and bring it with you rather than shopping during the day for coffee or lunch etc.

If you're going out then definitely pre before you go out rather than in bars etc and don't let other students who may have a higher budget than you pressure you into spending more than you want to.

I hope that's some help, happy to answer any more specific budget questions if there's something I didn't mention.
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howcuriousamI
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I thought I'd read the law department was discontinued this past year. Are there still law courses coming in the future?
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juren98
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(Original post by howcuriousamI)
I thought I'd read the law department was discontinued this past year. Are there still law courses coming in the future?
I'm not sure if that's a serious question? Definitely still going, ranked no.7 in the world and running straight LLB and Law and Anthro as well as the various LLM courses. Really not sure where you'd have heard that??
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businessbria
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How common is it for students from London staying at home with parents and does that prove a bad decision when it comes to getting to morning lectures, going out with friends late at night, etc?
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juren98
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(Original post by businessbria)
How common is it for students from London staying at home with parents and does that prove a bad decision when it comes to getting to morning lectures, going out with friends late at night, etc?
Yeah it's quite common, I know lots of people who've done it. In terms of the social side I know guys who went into accommodation in first year and then stayed at home in their next 2 years so they could build up a group of friends but I also know some people who stayed at home and commuted from first year and I don't think they've had any problems with social stuff. I'm sure if you have friends in halls they'd let you stay after a night out, I've had friends doing that more times than I can remember.

In terms of lectures the LSE timetable I think technically can run from 8am-7pm but the earliest lectures or tutorials would be 9am so it's no worse than coming in for a job and I don't know of anyone who's wanted to come and not been able to because they live a bit further out you just need to get up earlier. That being said, 9ams tend to get a bit dead after about week 3 anyway.

I come from Essex and I'm actually considering commuting next year because it's so much cheaper and it gives you a better work/life balance but yeah I'd say if you're a bit worried about the social side especially in first year it might be worth going into halls. I think LSE offers support to students living outside of halls in terms of meeting other people and some kind of network. As long as you're proactive about getting engaged with student life at LSE I don't think it really matters.

I hope that helps. Happy to answer any other questions.
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businessbria
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(Original post by juren98)
Yeah it's quite common, I know lots of people who've done it. In terms of the social side I know guys who went into accommodation in first year and then stayed at home in their next 2 years so they could build up a group of friends but I also know some people who stayed at home and commuted from first year and I don't think they've had any problems with social stuff. I'm sure if you have friends in halls they'd let you stay after a night out, I've had friends doing that more times than I can remember.

In terms of lectures the LSE timetable I think technically can run from 8am-7pm but the earliest lectures or tutorials would be 9am so it's no worse than coming in for a job and I don't know of anyone who's wanted to come and not been able to because they live a bit further out you just need to get up earlier. That being said, 9ams tend to get a bit dead after about week 3 anyway.

I come from Essex and I'm actually considering commuting next year because it's so much cheaper and it gives you a better work/life balance but yeah I'd say if you're a bit worried about the social side especially in first year it might be worth going into halls. I think LSE offers support to students living outside of halls in terms of meeting other people and some kind of network. As long as you're proactive about getting engaged with student life at LSE I don't think it really matters.

I hope that helps. Happy to answer any other questions.
Thank you! That's really informative. How has your experience been with societies/clubs that are degree specific or sports? Are there many events to get to know people and network with people in the career you're looking into?
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juren98
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(Original post by businessbria)
Thank you! That's really informative. How has your experience been with societies/clubs that are degree specific or sports? Are there many events to get to know people and network with people in the career you're looking into?
Pretty much every subject taught at LSE has a society, they tend to vary in size and quality depending upon the size of their respective department at the uni so Econ and Law are the biggest and Grimshaw (IR) is up there as well. Others tend to be smaller and have less large or notable events but they're definitely all good and foster a good collegiate sense within departments. Law and Econ also have balls in Lent Term which are quite important social events for the whole uni really.

Sports societies are really great for their social side as you might expect and are a fantastic way to make friends. Obviously being in Central London, LSE doesn't have many on sight facilities though. In terms of actually playing the sports you have the advantage as with Oxbridge of being able to play for LSE or move up to the Uni of London if you're more serious about it.

In terms of career based stuff I'd probably say LSE has the best career oriented societies of any uni in the UK. As a law student I do most of that through Law Soc and it is very good, as you might expect at LSE, for its links into commercial law but they're actively expanding it now to include broader legal careers. Theres also Investment Soc, a bunch of banking and finance ones, consultancy, various ones for people interested in NGOs and development, international relations based careers and politics. That's all I can think of off the top of my head and the LSE Careers team is very good as well. People tend to take societies quite seriously at LSE so they generally deliver really good events and socials. There are tons of networking events, workshops and conferences throughout the year either run by societies or externally that societies will get involved with so yeah while there may be some negatives about LSE, careers based stuff is definitely not one of them.
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misszoewalshx
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I'm looking at studying at LSE, I want to do Politics with Economics, but I'm worried about the cost. Do you know of any bursaries I could look for?
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juren98
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(Original post by misszoewalshx)
I'm looking at studying at LSE, I want to do Politics with Economics, but I'm worried about the cost. Do you know of any bursaries I could look for?
I'm probably not the best person to answer, I'd recommend contacting the university and asking but before that take a look on the website.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...ding/bursaries

I know there are lots available and I know plenty of people who are in receipt of bursaries or scholarships. If you get accepted and can demonstrate financial hardship I don't think LSE would let you not be able to attend for financial reasons.

Sorry I couldn't be more help, happy to help with anything else.
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misszoewalshx
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(Original post by juren98)
I'm probably not the best person to answer, I'd recommend contacting the university and asking but before that take a look on the website.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...ding/bursaries

I know there are lots available and I know plenty of people who are in receipt of bursaries or scholarships. If you get accepted and can demonstrate financial hardship I don't think LSE would let you not be able to attend for financial reasons.

Sorry I couldn't be more help, happy to help with anything else.
Thankyou for your help!
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juren98
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So I saw a couple of great questions about LSE in another thread which I said I'd answer here.

1) What are the prospects of getting part-time work near the main campus (I'd really like to cover some of my living costs)?

2) Is it difficult to have a good work-life balance considering the academic rigour of LSE courses?

I think your chances of getting part time work are generally decent, I know a plenty of people who do work while at LSE but obviously it does depend on the kind of work you're looking to do. I think there are some jobs available to students at LSE helping in outreach or admin for the SU which are known to pay well although they are quite competitive.

The work-life balance one is a very good question and I know a lot of people struggle with this and I certainly did at first but now I'd say I've found a decent balance. As a law student I do what is widely seen as one of the 'tougher' subjects and there is a lot of content but I don't really think it's too bad. You can make any subject more or less difficult and stressful with planning and time management. I try to treat my uni work like a regular job by that I mean I arrive at uni at a similar time each weekday morning and work until the evening regardless of if I have any contact hours. That way I'm putting in about 40 hours a week but just like with a job I can go out for lunch or drinks in the evening without feeling like I should be working. And just like with a job you can take a day off if you need to or put in overtime if you want to do especially well. By doing that I never have to work in my accommodation and I can stick to that routine all year even during revision.

Basically LSE degrees can definitely be hard but provided you prioritise your time and plan ahead you shouldn't have any trouble enjoying the social side of things.

I hope that helps.
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juren98
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Term time is coming around guys. Still here and happy to help so feel free to ask away!
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Kunal R
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(Original post by juren98)
Term time is coming around guys. Still here and happy to help so feel free to ask away!
Thanks for your previous response!

This might be a generic question but, what exactly is LSE looking for in our personal statement?
I’ve started writing up the first draft but I don’t know what exactly to include!
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juren98
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(Original post by Kunal R)
Thanks for your previous response!

This might be a generic question but, what exactly is LSE looking for in our personal statement?
I’ve started writing up the first draft but I don’t know what exactly to include!
Ok sure, it's been a while but I think I can give you some tips. LSE is one of the most competitive unis in the UK that doesn't interview and therefore your PS is one of the only things the uni will get from you beyond just your grades so obviously it is very important.

I would say you need to demonstrate a genuine (not too clichéd) interest in the subject. Make sure you know roughly what you'll be looking at in at least the first part of your course so you don't keep talking about something LSE doesn't offer. Try to be specific - talk about a specific part of the subject or something about the nature of the degree that links to what you've done or what you'd like to do (but don't focus too much on what the degree would do in the future - the uni doesn't like to be your means to an end). Link in stuff you've studied, read, any extra trips or experiences - anything which will help to show you actually care. This is more difficult for subjects that you haven't previously studied so research is key.

In terms of extra curricular stuff you need to link it to your degree, no top UK unis really care about your extra curricular stuff for its own sake - it needs to show either interest in the subject or your ability to stay on top of your workload/stay organised alongside your studies. So it's totally fine to talk about things that aren't directly related (eg you held elected student office or you played a sport etc) but keep them relevant and succinct.

Going back to the first point you need to show your interest not tell the reader about it and that's true throughout, demonstrating some quality or interest is much better than just saying that it exists.

This is kind of a given but it needs to read perfectly, be relatively engaging and where possible it should have some theme running through it to link the paragraphs together.

I hope that helps, happy to answer any other questions.
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Mad-Mullah
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(Original post by juren98)
Term time is coming around guys. Still here and happy to help so feel free to ask away!
Hi,

I'm a gap-year student that will be starting my LLB Law degree at the LSE next month. I had a few questions regarding the course:

1) What was your experience of the different first year modules (Obligations, Criminal, Public, Property & Intro to legal system) - in terms of difficulty, teacher quality, reading quantity, etc...?

2) For first year exams, do you need to revise all the topics or do you know which topics will come up in the exams?

3) Are law students at lse generally helpful and willing to help each other revise?

4) Any general tips for incoming LLB students would be helpful!
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juren98
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(Original post by Mad-Mullah)
Hi,

I'm a gap-year student that will be starting my LLB Law degree at the LSE next month. I had a few questions regarding the course:

1) What was your experience of the different first year modules (Obligations, Criminal, Public, Property & Intro to legal system) - in terms of difficulty, teacher quality, reading quantity, etc...?

2) For first year exams, do you need to revise all the topics or do you know which topics will come up in the exams?

3) Are law students at lse generally helpful and willing to help each other revise?

4) Any general tips for incoming LLB students would be helpful!
1) I'd say the first year modules vary in their difficulty, obviously because they cover a huge range of legal topics and they're all compulsory you will almost certainly find some more interesting than others. Public is probably the hardest conceptually and obligations probably has the most content because it is basically two distinct halves (contract and tort) combined into a single exam. They're all challenging, opinions vary but I would say none is very hard if you put the work in and in all honesty ILS is a bit of a joke. The teaching quality is very good across the board really, certainly better than some other departments I've studied under at LSE, law makes very little use of grad teaching assistants so you will be taught by professors and experienced practitioners. There's a lot of reading for all the first year modules, there is probably a minimum amount you can get away with throughout the year but if you wanted to do it all you're probably looking at a 50-60hr week.

2)That varies a lot across the modules - Property and ILS you can definitely predict which topics will come up and only revise 3 or 4 for each. The others it is harder because they use different types of questions and in public you need to answer 4/9 I think so you can't afford to ignore too much and the topics are very linked. Criminal and obligations both use problem questions as well as essays which require a different kind of knowledge (breadth rather than depth) so again that limits what you can cut out. So overall I'd say you definitely don't need to learn everything but you are taking an increasingly risky gamble the more you miss out and I know plenty of people who got it wrong and paid for it.

3)Errr...sort of. Most students in law are definitely friendly and helpful but the law department definitely isn't known as one of the most collegiate and there is a lot of competition between students which the department has been trying to stop because it's kind of pointless (at least in academics). A lot of the bad reputation comes from the career rivalry which really starts in second year but I'd say if you can find a group of friends who are nice, helpful people and there are plenty of them, then you'll be fine.

4) I would say make the most of the fantastic opportunities that LSE law gives you and try to stay on top of the work from the beginning because it will seem easy in the first couple of weeks but then it really stacks up. Try to find older students to help you (feel free to PM me) and don't let the whole careers thing get to you so early on. If they still make you do that Foundational Legal Skills course don't take it very seriously. In terms of any practical advice I'd say review your essay writing skills as you've been on a gap year (when I finished mine I hadn't written an essay for ages) and maybe take a look a book or two (again PM and I can give you some recommendations depending on what you're interested in) but ultimately just get as organised as you can and be ready to hit the ground running.

I hope that helped.
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