📣Careers advice live NOW📣 Watch

National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Send us your careers, education, employment and apprenticeship questions from 6pm-9pm!
1
reply
Alayna1234
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Hi, I think I’ve failed my a levels so I have a long way to go to med, but my question was what stem based jobs or degrees have high rates of employment ?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Alayna1234)
Hi, I think I’ve failed my a levels so I have a long way to go to med, but my question was what stem based jobs or degrees have high rates of employment ?
Hi there,

Thanks for your question.

To be honest most STEM careers are seeing strong job growth across the country and it is a fast growing career sector. Did you have any specific jobs in mind?

I hope that your A-level results are not what you're thinking but if this does happen there are other options and pathways out there.

Thanks - Sophie.
0
reply
mathsguy123
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
Hi there, I am in a bit of a situation right now. I'm currently working a full-time job with a somewhat long commute (2.5 hours a day both sides). I want to get on a graduate scheme for 2020 and they open in the upcoming September however, the application process for them is quite long so I'm not sure if there will be enough time for me after work in the evenings + weekends to apply myself fully to graduate scheme applications. Should I consider leaving my FT job, get a part time job (if I can get one) and look for graduate schemes full time?
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by mathsguy123)
Hi there, I am in a bit of a situation right now. I'm currently working a full-time job with a somewhat long commute (2.5 hours a day both sides). I want to get on a graduate scheme for 2020 and they open in the upcoming September however, the application process for them is quite long so I'm not sure if there will be enough time for me after work in the evenings + weekends to apply myself fully to graduate scheme applications. Should I consider leaving my FT job, get a part time job (if I can get one) and look for graduate schemes full time?
Hi there,

Thanks for your post.

Two and half hours either side of your working day is considerably higher than the average (58 minutes) so I fully sympathise with your situation.

Do you get a couple of days off a week either at the weekends or during the week? Or are you able to plan in a few days of annual leave that will allow you to focus on your applications?

Look forward to hearing back from you.

Thanks - Sophie.
0
reply
mathsguy123
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by National Careers Service)
Hi there,

Thanks for your post.

Two and half hours either side of your working day is considerably higher than the average (58 minutes) so I fully sympathise with your situation.

Do you get a couple of days off a week either at the weekends or during the week? Or are you able to plan in a few days of annual leave that will allow you to focus on your applications?

Look forward to hearing back from you.

Thanks - Sophie.
Ok so I have thought about that, I have 25 days annual leave allowance from now to end of April. Can possibly buy 10 holidays extra which gives me 35 days off. But will that be enough? I am not sure. I graduated in 2018 so really would like to get on to a good graduate scheme and not take risks however, maybe I am over estimating the work to get a graduate scheme? Interested to hear your and other peoples' opinions.
0
reply
hotchocolate66
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
Hi.

I graduated from university with a BA in Study of Religions this year.
My dissertation was marked 75 and it was on Antisemitism.

However, I'm interested in pursuing a career in climate change and environmental conservation. I'm planning to do an Msc in a relevant subject but I'm unsure if prospective universities would consider me as a candidate for an Msc in this course.

I'm doing courses from Coursera and Futurelearn to supplement my academic CV but in case nothing works out, what prospects do I have in the graduate market??

I would like to start off with a job in editorial writing and I do have some experience as I was a writer for the official University newspaper. So what areas of writing/publishing can I explore if a masters degree seems out of question? Like where to contact or how to start looking for companies who would hire writers to write in newspapers etc?

Thank you
Last edited by hotchocolate66; 1 month ago
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by mathsguy123)
Ok so I have thought about that, I have 25 days annual leave allowance from now to end of April. Can possibly buy 10 holidays extra which gives me 35 days off. But will that be enough? I am not sure. I graduated in 2018 so really would like to get on to a good graduate scheme and not take risks however, maybe I am over estimating the work to get a graduate scheme? Interested to hear your and other peoples' opinions.
Thanks for getting back to me.

It depends on how many you are thinking about applying for.

I would have thought that over the space of a week or even a few days you could do a fair few applications. People spend between 1-2 hours on a job applications (generally speaking).

It would be great to hear from other graduates about how long they tend to spend on the applications.

You could organise this in way that is more time efficient by narrowing down the positions you know you definitely want to apply for and try to read up on the organisations in your free time before sitting down to do the application process.

The hard truth is this question is a little bit like 'how long is a piece of string'

My advice would be to try and set aside some time (maybe take a week off) to focus on your applications, get yourself organised so you know exactly which ones you want to apply for and in your free time in between tasks do your organisation research.

I hope some other graduates are around tonight to help you out too!
1
reply
mathsguy123
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by National Careers Service)
Thanks for getting back to me.

It depends on how many you are thinking about applying for.

I would have thought that over the space of a week or even a few days you could do a fair few applications. People spend between 1-2 hours on a job applications (generally speaking).

It would be great to hear from other graduates about how long they tend to spend on the applications.

You could organise this in way that is more time efficient by narrowing down the positions you know you definitely want to apply for and try to read up on the organisations in your free time before sitting down to do the application process.

The hard truth is this question is a little bit like 'how long is a piece of string'

My advice would be to try and set aside some time (maybe take a week off) to focus on your applications, get yourself organised so you know exactly which ones you want to apply for and in your free time in between tasks do your organisation research.

I hope some other graduates are around tonight to help you out too!
Yeah I agree. I am thinking of applying for enough that will lead me to 5 final stage interviews/ assessment centres so that there is a high probability of me getting one. And thanks for the feedback, it helps a lot!
1
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by hotchocolate66)
Hi.

I graduated from university with a BA in Study of Religions this year.
My dissertation was marked 75 and it was on Antisemitism.

However, I'm interested in pursuing a career in climate change and environmental conservation. I'm planning to do an Msc in a relevant subject but I'm unsure if prospective universities would consider me as a candidate for an Msc in this course.

I'm doing courses from Coursera and Futurelearn to supplement my academic CV but in case nothing works out, what prospects do I have in the graduate market??

I would like to start off with a job in editorial writing and I do have some experience as I was a writer for the official University newspaper. So what areas of writing/publishing can I explore if a masters degree seems out of question? Like where to contact or how to start looking for companies who would hire writers to write in newspapers etc?

Thank you
Hi there,

Thanks for getting involved tonight.

The best advice I can give is speak to the uni's directly. Your degree isn't related to the Msc you want to do but, they MAY be willing to overlook that based on how well you did and encourage you to make an application.

Getting into writing careers involves a lot of networking and getting your writing noticed. Volunteering at local newspapers can be a good place to start as well as doing your blogging in your free time.

You could work in TV or radio as a scriptwriter. BBC Writersroom has information, advice and workshops on writing and submitting scripts - https://www.bbc.co.uk/writersroom/

The Poetry Society and Writers & Artists have more details on writing competitions, how to enter and get involved -
https://poetrysociety.org.uk/competitions/
https://www.writersandartists.co.uk/

Once you start to build up both your experience and your reputation you may find it a little easier to go for writing jobs as you'll start to build up a portfolio of your work.

I hope that helps, let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks - Sophie
0
reply
ltsmith
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by National Careers Service)
To be honest most STEM careers are seeing strong job growth across the country and it is a fast growing career sector. Did you have any specific jobs in mind?
not true.

have you seen the meme 'when we say STEM is in demand, we actually just meant the TE' sometimes it's 'when we say STEM is in demand, we actually just meant the T'
0
reply
hotchocolate66
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by National Careers Service)
Hi there,

Thanks for getting involved tonight.

The best advice I can give is speak to the uni's directly. Your degree isn't related to the Msc you want to do but, they MAY be willing to overlook that based on how well you did and encourage you to make an application.

Getting into writing careers involves a lot of networking and getting your writing noticed. Volunteering at local newspapers can be a good place to start as well as doing your blogging in your free time.

You could work in TV or radio as a scriptwriter. BBC Writersroom has information, advice and workshops on writing and submitting scripts - https://www.bbc.co.uk/writersroom/

The Poetry Society and Writers & Artists have more details on writing competitions, how to enter and get involved -
https://poetrysociety.org.uk/competitions/
https://www.writersandartists.co.uk/

Once you start to build up both your experience and your reputation you may find it a little easier to go for writing jobs as you'll start to build up a portfolio of your work.

I hope that helps, let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks - Sophie
Thanks for the valuable feedback. I really appreciate it. I will definitely start blogging and looking into the links you provided.

Regarding newspapers, I was wondering how can I start volunteering at the newspapers. For example, I live in London, in Camden area and they have a local newspaper. There's also bigger names like the guardian.
How can I approach these institutions? At this point I'm a bit clueless hence asking
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by ltsmith)
not true.

have you seen the meme 'when we say STEM is in demand, we actually just meant the TE' sometimes it's 'when we say STEM is in demand, we actually just meant the T'
I haven't seen it, but I'm not sure I would take careers advice from a meme but that's just me personally.
0
reply
Lostgirl12
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by National Careers Service)
Send us your careers, education, employment and apprenticeship questions from 6pm-9pm!
I’m going back to university after a gap year to finish my final year. I want to get a banking job but I don’t have any experience or internship in banking. However, I have done some volunteer work at my university and the local community centre. Could you please advice me on how can I make my application better and how can I stand out?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by hotchocolate66)
Thanks for the valuable feedback. I really appreciate it. I will definitely start blogging and looking into the links you provided.

Regarding newspapers, I was wondering how can I start volunteering at the newspapers. For example, I live in London, in Camden area and they have a local newspaper. There's also bigger names like the guardian.
How can I approach these institutions? At this point I'm a bit clueless hence asking
My advice would be to email them, quite formally and explain that you're looking to build a career in the industry and build your work experience and would like the opportunity to volunteer or do some work placements with the newspaper.

The more you approach the more likely it is you will hear back. You could even approach local charities who often look for volunteers to support with their media and social media activity.
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by Lostgirl12)
I’m going back to university after a gap year to finish my final year. I want to get a banking job but I don’t have any experience or internship in banking. However, I have done some volunteer work at my university and the local community centre. Could you please advice me on how can I make my application better and how can I stand out?
Hi there,

Thanks for getting in touch tonight.

Can I ask if you would consider getting some financial experience during your final year?

Generally, you will need about 6-12 months of relevant work experience on your CV especially for things like graduate schemes.

Thanks - Sophie.
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#17
Thanks for all your questions tonight, if you missed our live session you can chat to our advisers online until 10pm here -

https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/contact-us

GOODNIGHT
0
reply
DuckDodgers
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
Goodnight.
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by ltsmith)
not true.

have you seen the meme 'when we say STEM is in demand, we actually just meant the TE' sometimes it's 'when we say STEM is in demand, we actually just meant the T'
Unfair isn’t it? No one tells 18 year olds that biology related degrees are not particularly employable but they promotion of STEM not unrealistically leads them to think all STEM degrees are the way to go.
0
reply
National Careers Service
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#20
Hi! We are live on TSR until 9pm! If you have any questions regarding careers, education or employment- ask us here.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

4,736

people online now

225,530

students helped last year

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (190)
12.77%
Excited (122)
8.2%
Worried (279)
18.75%
Terrified (343)
23.05%
Meh (123)
8.27%
Confused (34)
2.28%
Putting on a brave face (202)
13.58%
Impatient (195)
13.1%

Watched Threads

View All