Tips for someone transitioning from catered halls, to actually cooking for themselves Watch

SuperHuman98
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I cook quite a bit home during the holidays so thats alright.

Just any quick advice/tips for sharing a kitchen for the first time? House of 7...

How to make sure noone takes your eggs/milk etc..?
Should I actually bring plates or just make do with lunchbox?
How much do I need to bring with me? etc...

Just any advice in general as I take train/coach to my uni city, and so I need to think about carrying less than I need. Already have my duvet in my room
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S1elyak1
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Since you are getting the train to uni don't buy plates until you get there. Even better if you speak to your housemates prior to moving in and you can all agree to put money together to buy necessities rather than having like 7 different sets of plates and 20 pans etc. If they are not keen on the idea definitely wait until you have moved into your house before buying anything. Wilko do cheap sets of plates and pans. In regards to fridge/freezer space usually each person has their own shelf and drawer to put their items in. If I were you I would not be the person to write your name on everything that you own
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doodle_333
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Buy stuff after you arrive. Get 2 of everything (plate, small plate, glass, mug, bowl) and a set of cutlery in a recognizable design so no one gets confused. Buy a frying pan (it's worth going reasonable quality on this, think 15-20£), saucepan and baking tray and some cheap Tupperware. You can get anything else as it comes up.

You'll need to divide the kitchen space, that could be according to number of cupboards or shelves etc.

Decide with flatmates if you want some shared items eg milk and butter but imo it's better to have your own or someone ends up not replacing it when you need it or using a ton when you use barely any.

Honestly people might steal stuff occasionally but it's less likely in a house share. Better to take a chilled approach to small items like milk and eggs bc at some point you'll need some yourself and being able to borrow some back will be useful.
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Mr Wednesday
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Practice a few meals you can do easily in bulk in a single big baking tray, e.g. lasagne + garlic bread, shepherd's pie + peas etc. You can either freeze / defrost in meal size chunks so you dont have to cook every night, or feed the rest of the flat. Offer to cook once a week for the flat if others do the same. Some people will go for this, others want to be loners or can't cook well enough that you would want to eat what they make. After a few weeks, things tend to shake down to a routine, for a couple of years I regularly cooked once a week for about 4 of my flat and had the benefit of knowing I could head home after working late several times a week and get a decent meal.
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Stiff Little Fingers
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Buy plates, utensils and pans when you get there if you're travelling there by train. Generally you'll have a cupboard and fridge/freezer space each in a shared fridge and kitchen, it'll be difficult to avoid anyone taking stuff if they want but I never found it to be an issue.
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
I cook quite a bit home during the holidays so thats alright.

Just any quick advice/tips for sharing a kitchen for the first time? House of 7...

How to make sure noone takes your eggs/milk etc..?
Should I actually bring plates or just make do with lunchbox?
How much do I need to bring with me? etc...

Just any advice in general as I take train/coach to my uni city, and so I need to think about carrying less than I need. Already have my duvet in my room
You would hope people are nice and will use their common sense and not eat food that they haven't bought. For the first few weeks you could write your name or initials on your food. In my student house (only 4 of us) we each have a shelf in the fridge and freezer, our own cupboards and so we just keep our food on our section then we know what's ours and isn't, especially helpful if we buy the same things.

You can buy everything you need when you're there. you can get plates and cutlery for really cheap at supermarkets. You just need to bring with you what you will use. Have a look around your kitchen at home and make a note of the things you use regularly that you'll need at uni like utensils, pans etc.
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Retired_Messiah
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Once you're all in the flat it's good practice to organise a fridge shelf division strategy. I share a flat with two other lads and we each get one shelf to make things easy (although doesn't matter in our case cause we're basically bezzies and know who's stuff is who's regardless). People purposefully taking stuff is a risk that's impossible to eliminate but most people have the sense to not make enemies of themselves and just take things without asking. Stuff like that one flatmate discovering a new recipe 10 minutes ago on the internet constantly hitting you with requests like "can I borrow an egg" is pretty commonplace, but if your flat has that kind of atmosphere it always works both ways.

Plates are better to buy when you get there if you're commuting up. You definitely want them in the flat more generally, other serving methods haven't been found to be superior.

Seeing as you already cook, learn a few things you can either batch cook and then store to microwave later (lasagne etc) or generally yeet together very quickly on minimal effort (all varieties of stir frys, par exemple). You're not going to always have the energy and motivation to cook something decent every night, so it's nice to have potential easy options or a pre-cooked meal on tap ready to go.

On a related note, get some tupperwares going. You can store and then later on microwave ur leftovers in them (assuming you buy microwave safe) and then eat straight out of em. Truly a marvel of engineering. (you can do the same with a bowl but **** bruh four portions of leftovers in 4 separate big ass bowls instead of 4 lil boxes? no thank you)

In general you might not really find your cooking rhythm right away. I didn't really get cooking proper meals regularly until midway through second year. It's ok to have some chicken dippers and potato waffles sometimes my man, we've all been there.
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