How to move out as soon as i turn 18 Watch

sophiebophie
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Because of the environment at home, I want to move out as soon as possible after I turn 18. However, I need tips on house hunting and reasonable prices and budgets. I know that I want to live in reasonably central London (think Peckham or Camberwell) and have good travel links, not have a shared bathroom or kitchen etc. I know my standards are too high but if anyone has any tips finding a property like this, please give me tips!
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Drewski
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What's your budget?
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Anonymous #1
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That seems ridiculously unreasonable at 18, what job do you have now and what would your budget be?
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Life_Order
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You need to calculate carefully but yes it's doable. The only way for you to move out without money from relatives or acquaintances is to study at university - but you'll probably need to share the bathroom.

You normally apply for university courses via UCAS which you probably already know through school.

For an undergraduate course, you would receive a yearly tuition loan that covers all of your tuition (which is £9250 per year directly paid to the uni) and you would receive a maintenance loan (for rent cost) of £11,672 every year (only if you study in London; outside London: £8944). Note that you don't get this money all at once every year, but it's paid in installments. Most get a third of the yearly sum every four months.
More information here: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/n...ltime-students

Now, doing the math. Imagine you got accepted at UCL (which is primarily based in Central London). Tuition fee is already covered; single person accommodation costs around £177.45 (shared bathroom) to £300 (en-suite, so own bathroom) per week. That is £9227.4 per year on the lower end and £15,600 on the higher end.

Insurance: You don't have to pay for water or electricity (they are included in the rent cost), and many of your possessions are already insured from theft, fire and floods via Endsleigh, as long as they are in your room. These include: laptops, mobile phones, tablets, clothes, musical instruments, jewellery.

What else is insured?
Here: https://www.endsleigh.co.uk/student/.../?HHRef=HH1410

UCL rent cost here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/accommodation/...-fees-20192020

OK. So you receive the maintenance loan of £11,672 per year. Say you persuaded yourself to rent a shared bathroom because the situation at home is unbearable. Remember, other students also don't like sharing their bathrooms with "strangers", but you quickly become friends and usually other students aren't extremely unhygienic.

For one year: Loan of £11,672 - 9227.4 (shared bathroom rent cost) = £2444.6 left.

So with that option, you would have around £203.71 per month, or roughly £50 per week, or ~£7 per day to spend on food and beverages etc.

Now, you could work 10 hours per week at a minimum wage job, e.g. in a supermarket. The min wage for 18-20 year olds in the UK is £5.90 per hour at the moment. So you would make £59/week, or £236/month. 10 hours/week of work is absolutely doable (Several people I know, including myself, did it too during the entire undergrad degree and graduated), especially if you work in the evening hours. Many students do it and it's good for your CV. Just ask a worker in a supermarket if you could start working there, you usually don't require a CV (I never needed it) but it could help.

If you add the £236 you earn per month to your £203.71, you would have £439.71 - or ~£109 per week to spend on food and water and leisure. You can live with that. Usually, accommodations for undergrad students are "part-catered" which means they offer lunch and/or dinner in big student halls for a cheap price such as £4 per meal.

So I recommend looking up courses you might be interested in, and apply for more than just a few.
Last edited by Life_Order; 4 weeks ago
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sophiebophie
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(Original post by Drewski)
What's your budget?
(Original post by Anonymous)
That seems ridiculously unreasonable at 18, what job do you have now and what would your budget be?
it's pretty unreasonable, but since my uni course is only gonna be 4-10 hours a week i would work a lot, but hopefully my budget would be around 600 a month (probably with a flatshare or a studio apartment). Don't have a job atm as I'm not 16 yet. I'm already saving up of course though.
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sophiebophie
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bless your soul ... i'll definitely try to follow our advice! i'm a bit more helpful now
(Original post by TommyPostGrad)
You need to calculate carefully but yes it's doable. The only way for you to move out without money from relatives or acquaintances is to study at university - but you'll probably need to share the bathroom.

You normally apply for university courses via UCAS which you probably already know through school.

For an undergraduate course, you would receive a yearly tuition loan that covers all of your tuition (which is £9250 per year directly paid to the uni) and you would receive a maintenance loan (for rent cost) of £11,672 every year (only if you study in London; outside London: £8944). Note that you don't get this money all at once every year, but it's paid in installments. Most get a third of the yearly sum every four months.
More information here: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/n...ltime-students

Now, doing the math. Imagine you got accepted at UCL (which is primarily based in Central London). Tuition fee is already covered; single person accommodation costs around £177.45 (shared bathroom) to £300 (en-suite, so own bathroom) per week. That is £9227.4 per year on the lower end and £15,600 on the higher end.

Insurance: You don't have to pay for water or electricity (they are included in the rent cost), and many of your possessions are already insured from theft, fire and floods via Endsleigh, as long as they are in your room. These include: laptops, mobile phones, tablets, clothes, musical instruments, jewellery.

What else is insured?
Here: https://www.endsleigh.co.uk/student/.../?HHRef=HH1410

UCL rent cost here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/accommodation/...-fees-20192020

OK. So you receive the maintenance loan of £11,672 per year. Say you persuaded yourself to rent a shared bathroom because the situation at home is unbearable. Remember, other students also don't like sharing their bathrooms with "strangers", but you quickly become friends and usually other students aren't extremely unhygienic.

For one year: Loan of £11,672 - 9227.4 (shared bathroom rent cost) = £2444.6 left.

So with that option, you would have around £203.71 per month, or roughly £50 per week, or ~£7 per day to spend on food and beverages etc.

Now, you could work 10 hours per week at a minimum wage job, e.g. in a supermarket. The min wage for 18-20 year olds in the UK is £5.90 per hour at the moment. So you would make £59/week, or £236/month. 10 hours/week of work is absolutely doable (Several people I know, including myself, did it too during the entire undergrad degree and graduated), especially if you work in the evening hours. Many students do it and it's good for your CV. Just ask a worker in a supermarket if you could start working there, you usually don't require a CV (I never needed it) but it could help.

If you add the £236 you earn per month to your £203.71, you would have £439.71 - or ~£109 per week to spend on food and water and leisure. You can live with that. Usually, accommodations for undergrad students are "part-catered" which means they offer lunch and/or dinner in big student halls for a cheap price such as £4 per meal.

So I recommend looking up courses you might be interested in, and apply for more than just a few.
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