MonocleMysterio
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#1
Up until recently, I was very focused on getting into medicine, but having had more exposure to the life of current and aspiring doctors I realise it's not for me. I do, however, think I've found a better future for myself in the field of Engineering, specifically Mechanical or Electrical. The only problem is my A-Level choice are pretty medicine centric (Maths, Bio, Chem) and many engineering courses require you to have taken physics or further maths. Not really sure where I can apply realistically. I have some decent predicted grades and am currently sorting out work experience, but any help would be appreciated.
0
reply
I’m_triene
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 months ago
#2
Look around at prospective unis course details and see what they require, that’s what I did when looking at chemistry and biochemistry bc some need maths and I didn’t take it
0
reply
Crapaud8
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 months ago
#3
You've probably already considered this but maybe taking a year out after a levels to do a physics a level. You could also see whether unis accept an AS in physics as you could do that second year. Email different unis an see what they say, that's probably your best option rn.
0
reply
Deggs_14
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 months ago
#4
Do a gap year and during that time you can look at 1 year a level physics courses, whilst doing work experience at the same time?
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 months ago
#5
(Original post by MonocleMysterio)
Up until recently, I was very focused on getting into medicine, but having had more exposure to the life of current and aspiring doctors I realise it's not for me. I do, however, think I've found a better future for myself in the field of Engineering, specifically Mechanical or Electrical. The only problem is my A-Level choice are pretty medicine centric (Maths, Bio, Chem) and many engineering courses require you to have taken physics or further maths. Not really sure where I can apply realistically. I have some decent predicted grades and am currently sorting out work experience, but any help would be appreciated.
Would you consider Civil Engineering or Chemical Engineering as many good unis don't require A level Physics for these courses (examples being Chem Eng at Sheffield or Civil Eng at Southampton, which has vacancies in Clearing)? If you are determined to go for mech eng or electrical, I think you would need to do Physics A level or possibly apply to unis that offer foundation years for students who have chosen the wrong A level subjects
Last edited by harrysbar; 2 months ago
0
reply
aderonkeo
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 months ago
#6
If there aren’t any unis that are able to take you without phys/further maths-
Retake the year, drop biology in place of Physics (and Further Maths). And take chem and maths as normal
0
reply
MonocleMysterio
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#7
After doing a bit more research into it, a lot of people who've done Chemical Engineering have gone onto do Mech careers, so I may be able to get away with that.
(Original post by harrysbar)
Would you consider Civil Engineering or Chemical Engineering as many good unis don't require A level Physics for these courses (examples being Chem Eng at Sheffield or Civil Eng at Southampton, which has vacancies in Clearing)? If you are determined to go for mech eng or electrical, I think you would need to do Physics A level or possibly apply to unis that offer foundation years for students who have chosen the wrong A level subjects
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 months ago
#8
(Original post by MonocleMysterio)
After doing a bit more research into it, a lot of people who've done Chemical Engineering have gone onto do Mech careers, so I may be able to get away with that.
I would be very surprised if that was the case... what kind of careers are you specifically referring to?
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 months ago
#9
(Original post by MonocleMysterio)
Up until recently, I was very focuseon getting into medicine, but having had more exposure to the life of current and aspiring doctors I realise it's not for me. I do, however, think I've found a better future for myself in the field of Engineering, specifically Mechanical or Electrical. The only problem is my A-Level choice are pretty medicine centric (Maths, Bio, Chem) and many engineering courses require you to have taken physics or further maths. Not really sure where I can apply realistically. I have some decent predicted grades and am currently sorting out work experience, but any help would be appreciated.
I looked into this for someone in the same position as you. If you check out say 10 to 20 university websites you will find courses open to you - especially for EEE. There are also foundation years which may be of interest?
0
reply
Newcastle University Student Ambassador
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 months ago
#10
Hi MonocleMysterio,

Have you considered Newcastle University? For their Electrical and Electronic Engineering courses you need "Mathematics and at least one of Physics, Chemistry or Electronics" and for the Mechanical Engineering you need "Mathematics and at least one of Physics, Chemistry or Further Mathematics". So because you did Maths and Chemistry, you would be able to apply for both.

Here are the links for both pages:
EEE - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ryrequirements
ME - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ryrequirements

Also, while studying at Newcastle University, I saw a lot of students change from one form of engineering to another during or after first year, so if you do Mechanical Engineering and decide that it isn't for you, you can always change to Marine/Civil/Chemical etc

- Jasmine
(Original post by MonocleMysterio)
Up until recently, I was very focused on getting into medicine, but having had more exposure to the life of current and aspiring doctors I realise it's not for me. I do, however, think I've found a better future for myself in the field of Engineering, specifically Mechanical or Electrical. The only problem is my A-Level choice are pretty medicine centric (Maths, Bio, Chem) and many engineering courses require you to have taken physics or further maths. Not really sure where I can apply realistically. I have some decent predicted grades and am currently sorting out work experience, but any help would be appreciated.
1
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 months ago
#11
(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi MonocleMysterio,

Have you considered Newcastle University? For their Electrical and Electronic Engineering courses you need "Mathematics and at least one of Physics, Chemistry or Electronics" and for the Mechanical Engineering you need "Mathematics and at least one of Physics, Chemistry or Further Mathematics". So because you did Maths and Chemistry, you would be able to apply for both.

Here are the links for both pages:
EEE - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ryrequirements
ME - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ryrequirements

Also, while studying at Newcastle University, I saw a lot of students change from one form of engineering to another during or after first year, so if you do Mechanical Engineering and decide that it isn't for you, you can always change to Marine/Civil/Chemical etc

- Jasmine
Wow, sounds like they would be good options for MonocleMysterio to consider
1
reply
swanseajack1
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 months ago
#12
There are a number of decent universities showing Mech Eng in clearing with Maths and Chemistry. Exeter, Lancaster, Liverpool and Sheffield amongst them. Manchester also accepts applicants who do not have Physics but have M1 and M2 as part of their Maths A levels. There might be more options by results day.
(Original post by MonocleMysterio)
Up until recently, I was very focused on getting into medicine, but having had more exposure to the life of current and aspiring doctors I realise it's not for me. I do, however, think I've found a better future for myself in the field of Engineering, specifically Mechanical or Electrical. The only problem is my A-Level choice are pretty medicine centric (Maths, Bio, Chem) and many engineering courses require you to have taken physics or further maths. Not really sure where I can apply realistically. I have some decent predicted grades and am currently sorting out work experience, but any help would be appreciated.
1
reply
Uni of Exeter
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 months ago
#13
Hi. Your a level subjects are fit our requirements for all our engineering programmes here at Exeter. From the prospectus we require A level Maths at B and another science subject at grade B - so both Chemistry and Biology would qualify. No need to do any other subjects, you can apply this year. I suggest that you look at our website and see if any of our courses (and the university) appeal to you, then give our Admissions team a call on 01392 723044 to discuss your options and how best to proceed.
We are holding Campus Tours on Mon and Fri should you wish to visit the campus (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/visiting/tours/) and a Clearing Open Day on Saturday 17th August if you want to see some accommodation, talk to students and someone from the College of Engineering. But first call is the course and then talk to Admissions.
Hope that this helps.
Karen
1
reply
MonocleMysterio
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#14
Thanks for the message . I was already seriously considering applying to Newcastle because I love the city, so hearing this is really good news.
(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi MonocleMysterio,

Have you considered Newcastle University? For their Electrical and Electronic Engineering courses you need "Mathematics and at least one of Physics, Chemistry or Electronics" and for the Mechanical Engineering you need "Mathematics and at least one of Physics, Chemistry or Further Mathematics". So because you did Maths and Chemistry, you would be able to apply for both.

Here are the links for both pages:
EEE - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ryrequirements
ME - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...ryrequirements

Also, while studying at Newcastle University, I saw a lot of students change from one form of engineering to another during or after first year, so if you do Mechanical Engineering and decide that it isn't for you, you can always change to Marine/Civil/Chemical etc

- Jasmine
1
reply
MyChemicalGarden
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#15
Report 3 weeks ago
#15
Your uni may offer interdepartmental exhanges where you can do modules from an engineering school.
On the other hand, a large number of engineering courses look for Maths + 2 relevant subjects, as you are doing science subjects,this shouldnt be an issue so it may be worth looking around or asking the uni directly. Dont worry about being behind other students who may have done physics, etc as the purpose of 1st year is to get everyone to the same level and you will be taught/retaught the basics anyway.

The worst thing you can do is continue doing a course you dont have a good interest in, as you need strong motiviation in the last year or two to handle the workload.

Appologies if this is too late.
Good luck!
0
reply
UoB - Engineering and Physical Sciences
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by MonocleMysterio)
Up until recently, I was very focused on getting into medicine, but having had more exposure to the life of current and aspiring doctors I realise it's not for me. I do, however, think I've found a better future for myself in the field of Engineering, specifically Mechanical or Electrical. The only problem is my A-Level choice are pretty medicine centric (Maths, Bio, Chem) and many engineering courses require you to have taken physics or further maths. Not really sure where I can apply realistically. I have some decent predicted grades and am currently sorting out work experience, but any help would be appreciated.
Hi!
I am a Mechanical Engineering student and know that many universities are taking physics off their requirements, University of Birmingham certainly doesn't require it. I would also say it is not necessary as first year is typically to bring everyone up to the same standard at most universities anyway.
You may find with maths that other students may be a little more confident having taken further maths but it just means you may have to work a little harder on some topics but definitely won't struggle too much!
Hope this was helpful!
~ Amy:rave:
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bournemouth University
    Midwifery Open Day at Portsmouth Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 16 Oct '19
  • Teesside University
    All faculties open Undergraduate
    Wed, 16 Oct '19
  • University of the Arts London
    London College of Fashion – Cordwainers Footwear and Bags & Accessories Undergraduate
    Wed, 16 Oct '19

How has the start of this academic year been for you?

Loving it - gonna be a great year (131)
17.99%
It's just nice to be back! (197)
27.06%
Not great so far... (263)
36.13%
I want to drop out! (137)
18.82%

Watched Threads

View All