theeetimdoherty
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Hi,

Does anyone know how this course differs to the standard economics course? Is it just greater focus on microeconomics? Is it comparable to Economics and Management?

Thanks in advance.
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Christopher Lim
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Hi ya!

I just finished my first year in Warwick doing straight Econs. Here's the difference between Straight Econs vs Econs + Industrial (plus some insider tips for you as well)

1) You'll have the same microeconomics content for both the courses, but with Econs + Industrial you'll have no optional modules and you will have to take modules from Warwick Business School (basically Introduction to Finance, Intro to Accounting etc kind of thing). In other Unis, the Econs + Industrial course would be similar to a Econs and Finance degree.

2) In Warwick, Straight Econs students have to go through a Econ World History module (which is hell) while Econs + Industrial is exempted from this module.

By hell I mean that at least 35% of your studying time would be devoted to World Econ History and you won't even use it for your 2nd year and it's bloody difficult to score. I got a 1st for Macro and Micro (which are the toughest modules) but scored a useless 2:2 for World History even though I studied my arse off for it.

Some people feel that BSc Econs sounds better than Econs + Industrial when looking for a job because the former goes into more depth than the latter. Additionally, Econs + Industrial doesn't offer you any flexibility while straight Econs means you get more optional modules. If you happen to think that way, the Warwick Econs hack is to study Econs + Industrial in your first year, then apply for a switch to Straight Econs in your 2nd year and you'll miss the horrendous history module while studying something actually useful for a job in the future. Unless, of course, you really like developmental economics then maybe world history is for you.

Nonetheless, both are really good courses so you definitely won't be a step behind either way! But really, world econs history is just hell
(Original post by theeetimdoherty)
Hi,

Does anyone know how this course differs to the standard economics course? Is it just greater focus on microeconomics? Is it comparable to Economics and Management?

Thanks in advance.
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theeetimdoherty
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Wow, when I posted I didn't expect someone to get any answers from actual people given how specific the question is. Do you have any advice on getting into Warwick Econs? From what you're saying the Econs + Industrial course sounds a lot less appealing, given the lack of flexibility in modules and the focus on finance.
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Christopher Lim
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(Original post by theeetimdoherty)
Wow, when I posted I didn't expect someone to get any answers from actual people given how specific the question is. Do you have any advice on getting into Warwick Econs? From what you're saying the Econs + Industrial course sounds a lot less appealing, given the lack of flexibility in modules and the focus on finance.
Hello, soz for the late reply! You should quote me next time in your reply so that I would get a notification to your questions.

I'm not exactly sure what advice are you looking for, but I'm guessing you got into Warwick Econs by now?

Besides that, do take my words with a pinch of salt because I'm speaking from a more academic standpoint, hence my inclination towards straight Econs. But if you're very keen to break into IB, the business school courses might be more relevant for your applications.

Of course, you could also do a BSc Econs degree and cram your optionals with finance related modules, and still achieve a similar pathway to a BSc Econs + Industrial degree. But you cannot do the reverse, meaning if you do Econs + Industrial you're stuck with certain finance modules whether you like it or not.

But all in all, choosing either pathways are both pretty good choices since you're doing Warwick Econs regardless, so don't fret too much about it! If anything, your prep for spring week is perhaps more important now.

Cheers!
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kobla
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(Original post by Christopher Lim)
Hello, soz for the late reply! You should quote me next time in your reply so that I would get a notification to your questions.

I'm not exactly sure what advice are you looking for, but I'm guessing you got into Warwick Econs by now?

Besides that, do take my words with a pinch of salt because I'm speaking from a more academic standpoint, hence my inclination towards straight Econs. But if you're very keen to break into IB, the business school courses might be more relevant for your applications.

Of course, you could also do a BSc Econs degree and cram your optionals with finance related modules, and still achieve a similar pathway to a BSc Econs + Industrial degree. But you cannot do the reverse, meaning if you do Econs + Industrial you're stuck with certain finance modules whether you like it or not.

But all in all, choosing either pathways are both pretty good choices since you're doing Warwick Econs regardless, so don't fret too much about it! If anything, your prep for spring week is perhaps more important now.

Cheers!
Hello, I am planning to apply to Warwick University for Econ but haven't yet decided which exact course yet. Do you know if personal statement is of high importance to this uni? Because I think I am more interested in Econ and industrial, but I haven't really done activities/read books on industrial to put on my PS, and I don't know whether I should prioritise that to be a more competitive candidate. Also, I know it is a silly question but is straight Econ in Warwick as Mathematical as everyone says it is? Or is it on the same level as other universities? And is straight Econ more mathematical than Econ + industrial?
Thank you in advance!
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Christopher Lim
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(Original post by kobla)
Hello, I am planning to apply to Warwick University for Econ but haven't yet decided which exact course yet. Do you know if personal statement is of high importance to this uni? Because I think I am more interested in Econ and industrial, but I haven't really done activities/read books on industrial to put on my PS, and I don't know whether I should prioritise that to be a more competitive candidate. Also, I know it is a silly question but is straight Econ in Warwick as Mathematical as everyone says it is? Or is it on the same level as other universities? And is straight Econ more mathematical than Econ + industrial?
Thank you in advance!
Hello! I'm not sure if this answer is still useful to you but I'll still answer it for the benefit of others. I think in general, your personal statement (PS) is very important and as long as you craft a good one, then you stand a chance with Warwick or any other Russel Group unis you're thinking about.

If you're set on doing Economics and Industrial, then having elements of industrial in your PS will be very helpful. I took some of Warwick's industrial economics modules and you learn loads about market structure, game theory and firm strategy (among other topics). If you're interested to learn more about the models, search up the Hotelling linear model or Bayesian game theory. In terms of career options, industrial economic modules will help land a career in Economic Consulting with firms like Compass Lexecon, Cornerstone Research or Frontier Economics. But of course, if you're applying to straight Econs in other places, then you'll have to be tactful when tailoring your PS.

In terms of Mathematics, I would say it definitely is very mathematical, which is probably a by-product of Warwick's very strong maths and stats department. Our Econometrics module in second year is insanely thorough and technical (which is great training!), and our lecturer (Jeremy Smith bless him) is one of the best lecturers you'll ever have. If you like maths, then there are advanced modules in linear algebra, micrometrics, timeseries econometrics that you can take. If not, then you can focus on "writing" modules like behavioural econs, developmental econs or economic history. There's always optional modules for people who like a middle ground; something theoretical but not gauge your brains out mathematical like public policy, international trade or labour economics. Most economic modules in Warwick have a certain element of Maths in them, and although it's not insanely difficult maths, it does require a strong fundamental understanding of maths to score well.
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