Chem Chem
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What can I do with only a medicine degree? Would doing a medicine degree and not taking it any further be a bad idea and what jobs could I do? I'm talking about in the UK btw. Thank you in advance.
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Chem Chem
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I understand that they include primarily doing a degree in medicine, which takes a minimum of 5 years. Then you go on and do 2 foundation years, and then you do specialist training but I'm not sure how long for? How long would it take in total to become either of these.
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Hdeinso
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What do you mean by ‘only a medicine degree’?
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Chem Chem
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Can you get a job, or would your only choice be to carry on and become a doctor? Or are you already a doctor at that point?
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Chem Chem
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I understand that it is a lengthy process, and rightly so, but are those 15 years give or take just studying or are you paid whilst you study? I don't understand how anyone can study for that long?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Chem Chem)
Can you get a job, or would your only choice be to carry on and become a doctor? Or are you already a doctor at that point?
You are already a doctor after graduation.

You can leave the profession (technically you don't even have to do foundation programme but most doctors do), go for a gap year or two or three (find out what you really want to do or travelling or work abroad), or apply to specialty training.

(Original post by Chem Chem)
I understand that it is a lengthy process, and rightly so, but are those 15 years give or take just studying or are you paid whilst you study? I don't understand how anyone can study for that long?
Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6026828. It's still being updated but most basic info is there.

(Original post by Chem Chem)
I understand that they include primarily doing a degree in medicine, which takes a minimum of 5 years. Then you go on and do 2 foundation years, and then you do specialist training but I'm not sure how long for? How long would it take in total to become either of these.
You'd have to train in anaesthetics. I don't understand why you'd think an anaesthetic doctor is not hospital doctor but there you go.

The training length is similar, 2 years of foundation programme then 3 years of core training followed by 4-5 years of specialty training.
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Miriam29
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(Original post by Chem Chem)
What can I do with only a medicine degree? Would doing a medicine degree and not taking it any further be a bad idea and what jobs could I do? I'm talking about in the UK btw. Thank you in advance.
Well a medical degree qualifies you to become a doctor and is the ONLY route in the UK to do so. However, doing a medical degree doesn’t limit you to only becoming a doctor. The degree itself shows a great capacity to work and solve problems, so other career paths like finance could be open to you if you wanted to go down that path.
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alex22wills
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a lot of jobs will take people with any type of degree, and don't need a specific one. However the main purpose of a medicine degree is to go off to become a doctor. There is no use in doing a medicine degree if you have no ambition to be a doctor, there are easier, shorter and cheaper degrees you can do for that. But obviously some people decide part way through a medicine degree or after qualifying that being a doctor isn't for them, so there are plenty of other career paths you could go down.
(Original post by Chem Chem)
What can I do with only a medicine degree? Would doing a medicine degree and not taking it any further be a bad idea and what jobs could I do? I'm talking about in the UK btw. Thank you in advance.
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Ghotay
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(Original post by Chem Chem)
I understand that it is a lengthy process, and rightly so, but are those 15 years give or take just studying or are you paid whilst you study? I don't understand how anyone can study for that long?
The 5 years of the medical degree are studying in the traditional sense. Going to uni, going to placement, attending lectures and teaching sessions.

Once you have graduated from medical school you are a doctor. You are a 'junior' doctor for the next 10 years or so. You are still learning, but not studying like at uni. Think of it as a very long and advanced apprenticeship. You are working, you are earning, you are a doctor, and in later stages of training you are very experienced and knowledgable. However there are exams and other things you must to do be allowed to progress to the next step as you move along the training pathway and that's why you are still a trainee/junior doctor
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asif007
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(Original post by Chem Chem)
What can I do with only a medicine degree? Would doing a medicine degree and not taking it any further be a bad idea and what jobs could I do? I'm talking about in the UK btw. Thank you in advance.
If you don’t want to become a doctor, why study Medicine in the first place? You would save yourself a lot of time, money and stress if you just followed the usual 3 year degree pathway in any other subject and apply for the job you want.

Of course there’s nothing wrong with finishing a Medicine degree and not becoming a doctor afterwards. But the people who do that were obviously dedicated enough to get through medical school but made their decision to change career while they were at medical school. My point is that if you are already considering not being a doctor before you’ve spent a day at medical school, why bother starting it at all? You won’t know what the job is like until you do it yourself, but Medicine is a long and arduous career pathway. It’s a huge undertaking and not to be taken lightly. You must have some sort of dedication to the work to be able to succeed at medical school, but to me it seems a bit pointless to study for 5+ years if you don’t want to do the job afterwards. By all means go for it if you know you could perform well and enjoy the work. But if you’re hoping to do Medicine for other reasons like parental pressure, status or money then I would advise you to choose something else and apply for a normal 3 year undergraduate degree.
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Harry14
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I would recommend finishing your course with your chosen specialty which will enable you to be a consultant/surgeon etc. Or stick to General Practice if you do not want to specialise
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asif007
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(Original post by Harry14)
I would recommend finishing your course with your chosen specialty which will enable you to be a consultant/surgeon etc. Or stick to General Practice if you do not want to specialise
How is becoming a consultant or surgeon or GP a good idea if they don’t want to continue past medical school?

GP is a specialty too you know.
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Although General practice is a speciality it is good if you want more variety in your work rather than just focusing on one area of medicine.

Perhaps continuing their studies for a few more years would be beneficial to reach where they want to be.

Working part time in a hospital in a role such as a healthcare assistant or even a porter would help them to achieve some patient interaction to see if they do want to continue their studies in this area.
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