Foundation Degree/HND, then Top-Up...? Watch

Lebal1984
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I'm looking at moving into this industry as a career-changing mature student.

Doing a Foundation Degree (similar to a HND set up) at a local college looks like a viable option.

Various Uni's then have top-up final years, and I'd be looking to relocate to London for the industry anyway; so could this then.

I am just trying to get a sense of what others think of the quality of the courses at Foundation/HND, is it comparable? Has anyone, or is anyone doing this, or know someone who has? Are potential people in future going to view it as somehow lesser?

A full standard degree is an option, but it is harder, so just trying to get a steer from those more in the know that naive little me...
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Xarao
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So you're planning to do just a foundation degree and leave it at that? If that's what you're saying, then don't bother. Logically, why would any company be interested in you, when they can hire thousands and thousands of people that already have a full degree of whatever qualification that you're trying to achieve. I'm not trying to put you off, but rather let you see the reality in what you're doing.

Edit: I'm a little confused at what you're trying to say. Are you going for a foundation degree at your local college, then planning to top-up to a full degree at a university? If so, why is a full standard degree "harder" if you're going to do it anyways?
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Lebal1984
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Apologies wasn't clear.

I would be doing the foundation, then doing the top-up.

Harder in terms of finance and the need for relocation, general upheaval.

It is just this path to the full degree, as it were, I am wondering if there is comparable value in it, and the perspectives about how it will be viewed.

I am after seeing the reality. Please do try to put me off!

As a recovering politician, I am looking for an industry that is less competitive and easier to get started in :-)



(Original post by Xarao)
So you're planning to do just a foundation degree and leave it at that? If that's what you're saying, then don't bother. Logically, why would any company be interested in you, when they can hire thousands and thousands of people that already have a full degree of whatever qualification that you're trying to achieve. I'm not trying to put you off, but rather let you see the reality in what you're doing.

Edit: I'm a little confused at what you're trying to say. Are you going for a foundation degree at your local college, then planning to top-up to a full degree at a university? If so, why is a full standard degree "harder" if you're going to do it anyways?
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PQ
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(Original post by Lebal1984)
Apologies wasn't clear.

I would be doing the foundation, then doing the top-up.

Harder in terms of finance and the need for relocation, general upheaval.

It is just this path to the full degree, as it were, I am wondering if there is comparable value in it, and the perspectives about how it will be viewed.

I am after seeing the reality. Please do try to put me off!

As a recovering politician, I am looking for an industry that is less competitive and easier to get started in :-)
What industry are you hoping to move into? And where are you hoping to top up the FdA?
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Lebal1984
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Post-production looks interesting, as does being a location manager. My background makes Producer-like role the more obvious, but not sure how possible that is from my entry point. It is part of why I want to study, rather than just go blag a volunteer role as whatever comes up, I'd like to get a better sense of a range of things as to what to pursue. The idea of spending a decade or so in a range of roles then coming full circle back to secondary education teaching in the broad field has its appeal.

I'd like to relocate to London, so makes a degree (pun intended) of sense to do this as part of that. Kingston one looks good, however, it is difficult to get a sense of these without again bending people in the know ears.

I could do a L3 in Media Production rather than the FdA, and some degrees seem to allow for second-year entry which might be more feasible.

Really should have listened and gone and trained as an accountant after the first degree....
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PQ
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(Original post by Lebal1984)
Post-production looks interesting, as does being a location manager. My background makes Producer-like role the more obvious, but not sure how possible that is from my entry point. It is part of why I want to study, rather than just go blag a volunteer role as whatever comes up, I'd like to get a better sense of a range of things as to what to pursue. The idea of spending a decade or so in a range of roles then coming full circle back to secondary education teaching in the broad field has its appeal.

I'd like to relocate to London, so makes a degree (pun intended) of sense to do this as part of that. Kingston one looks good, however, it is difficult to get a sense of these without again bending people in the know ears.

I could do a L3 in Media Production rather than the FdA, and some degrees seem to allow for second-year entry which might be more feasible.

Really should have listened and gone and trained as an accountant after the first degree....
Are you interested in a career in film? Or tv?

Starting an undergrad degree (especially a FdA hoping to top up) is a long route into the industry if you’re mature and already have a degree.

It’s unlikely that a good film school will accept third year entry with an FdA from a local FE college. Most would only offer second year entry so you’d be looking at four years study as the most likely outcome.

Kent offers a masters degree that accepts non film undergrad students. That followed by ntfs courses/modules would be a much quicker option and more appropriate imo.
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Lebal1984
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Probably TV, whilst everything is competitive the scare stories in film are something else.

It is a long route, but I'd be doing everything else outside of it so I can of see them as a tandem track thing.

Thank you for your insight into the journey.

The issue with second-year entry would be the student fee's as I don't think I'd be eligible for more than one year, so wise counsel.

To open a can of worms, which are the 'good schools'?

Would second-year entry with an L3 in Creative Media Production/experience/decent showreel be possible?

I see degrees with TV & Film, when they are one or the other does this close down moving into the other after?

I'll look into Kent, but blimey NTFS is some serious coinage.

It is all a bit dispiriting to think in terms of the length of the journey, but then that is the case with anything from where I am.

As my degree is in History of Art this isn't much use for...most things.

Thanks for the input, most appreciated.




(Original post by PQ)
Are you interested in a career in film? Or tv?

Starting an undergrad degree (especially a FdA hoping to top up) is a long route into the industry if you’re mature and already have a degree.

It’s unlikely that a good film school will accept third year entry with an FdA from a local FE college. Most would only offer second year entry so you’d be looking at four years study as the most likely outcome.

Kent offers a masters degree that accepts non film undergrad students. That followed by ntfs courses/modules would be a much quicker option and more appropriate imo.
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PQ
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If you have a degree then you won’t get a student loan for any FdA/HND or BA. NTFS works out quite reasonable ROI in comparison.

You can’t skip from a level 3 FE qualification into second year of a degree (level 5). A degree requires 360 credits at level 4, 5 and 6...you can’t just opt out of 1/3 of that.

Have you looked at the screenskills website?
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Lebal1984
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My degree was back in the day, for reasons to complex to explain I have only used one year of finance and would be eligible for at least 3 years more.

I spent an age speaking to SFE, which was like getting an education in Kremlinology itself, and it checks out.

It gets a bit sticky if I do a 2 years foundation and then a further 2 years in a way I haven't checked.

I've seen TV/Film Production degrees that are willing to consider second-year entry, Solent was one.

I'll look into NTFS, but ruled it out as I couldn't upfront the funding at the time. I'll look into it more, thanks.

On the other point, is it the case that if you do a more film production based path you can't move into TV after? Or vice versa?

Looked into Screenskills yes, but not all of it so ill go back, came here first as personal insight is always better.

Is UWE considered a 'top school'? They do film making, but not seemingly a TV-based one.

What about Kingston?

The Uni ranking tables are always a bit suspect in anything, and it is more an insider knowledge view that is more valuable.
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PQ
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(Original post by Lebal1984)
My degree was back in the day, for reasons to complex to explain I have only used one year of finance and would be eligible for at least 3 years more.

I spent an age speaking to SFE, which was like getting an education in Kremlinology itself, and it checks out.

It gets a bit sticky if I do a 2 years foundation and then a further 2 years in a way I haven't checked.

I've seen TV/Film Production degrees that are willing to consider second-year entry, Solent was one.

I'll look into NTFS, but ruled it out as I couldn't upfront the funding at the time. I'll look into it more, thanks.

On the other point, is it the case that if you do a more film production based path you can't move into TV after? Or vice versa?

Looked into Screenskills yes, but not all of it so ill go back, came here first as personal insight is always better.

Is UWE considered a 'top school'? They do film making, but not seemingly a TV-based one.

What about Kingston?

The Uni ranking tables are always a bit suspect in anything, and it is more an insider knowledge view that is more valuable.
If you have a BA then Student Finance do not fund (at all) a second undergraduate (or lower) degree. That applies even if your degree was taken in another country or completely self funded or studied part time. You might not have used your full funding but holding a degree makes you ineligible for support for a second undergraduate degree (unless it is in specific exempt subjects like nursing).
https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/who-qualifies
"If you already have a degree
"You may be eligible for limited funding in certain circumstances.
"You may get limited funding if you’re ‘topping up’ a higher education qualification, for example you’ve finished an HNC, HND or Foundation Degree and now want to do an Honours degree.
"You may also get limited funding if you hold an Honours degree or a higher level of qualification and start a part-time Honours degree, joint Honours degree or Integrated Master’s degree in one of the following (or 2 if it’s a joint Honours degree):
"engineering, computer science, technologies, medicine and allied subjects, biological sciences, agriculture and related subjects, physical sciences, mathematical sciences
"You could also be eligible if you’re starting a healthcare course on or after 1 August 2017."

Lots of universities will consider second year entry - if you have 120 credits or more at level 4.

Screenskills and BFI are the best places to find out direct information from the industry.
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Lebal1984
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It rests on disclosure though, they don't cross-check against a data of graduates, just what they have funded in the past.

If we can set this aside, apologies: I really do value the advice on the wider situation.

- Is it the case that if you do a more film production based path you can't move into TV after? Or vice versa?
- Is UWE considered a 'top school'? They do film making, but not seemingly a TV-based one (see above).
- Views on Kingston (they do a top up)?

(Original post by PQ)
If you have a BA then Student Finance do not fund (at all) a secoIt rests on disclosure though, they don't cross-check against a data of graduates, just what they have funded in the past.

If we can set this aside, apologies: I really do value the advice on the wider situation.

- Is it the case that if you do a more film production based path you can't move into TV after? Or vice versa?
- Is UWE considered a 'top school'? They do film making, but not seemingly a TV-based one (see above).
- Views on Kingston (they do a top up)? nd undergraduate (or lower) degree. That applies even if your degree was taken in another country or completely self funded or studied part time. You might not have used your full funding but holding a degree makes you ineligible for support for a second undergraduate degree (unless it is in specific exempt subjects like nursing).
https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/who-qualifies
"If you already have a degree
"You may be eligible for limited funding in certain circumstances.
"You may get limited funding if you’re ‘topping up’ a higher education qualification, for example you’ve finished an HNC, HND or Foundation Degree and now want to do an Honours degree.
"You may also get limited funding if you hold an Honours degree or a higher level of qualification and start a part-time Honours degree, joint Honours degree or Integrated Master’s degree in one of the following (or 2 if it’s a joint Honours degree):
"engineering, computer science, technologies, medicine and allied subjects, biological sciences, agriculture and related subjects, physical sciences, mathematical sciences
"You could also be eligible if you’re starting a healthcare course on or after 1 August 2017."

Lots of universities will consider second year entry - if you have 120 credits or more at level 4.

Screenskills and BFI are the best places to find out direct information from the industry.
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PQ
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(Original post by Lebal1984)
It rests on disclosure though, they don't cross-check against a data of graduates, just what they have funded in the past.

If we can set this aside, apologies: I really do value the advice on the wider situation.

- Is it the case that if you do a more film production based path you can't move into TV after? Or vice versa?
- Is UWE considered a 'top school'? They do film making, but not seemingly a TV-based one (see above).
- Views on Kingston (they do a top up)?
Screenskills and BFI are the best places to find out direct information from the industry.

Sorry - I'm not interested in giving advice to someone intent on committing fraud to obtain funding they aren't entitled to.
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