Distance Learning Watch

Jamie.B124
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Classroom situation not good for me and I work slower than the rest of the class, I'm 31 the rest of the group were 16 -18 and doing multiple A-Levels... I needed more than 10 minutes to answer 6 questions on topics I'd never seen before. Is it possible I can study at home - not join a college... and sit the exams at college just the exams only. Do I have to join an open-distance-learning for £295 per course and then contact the college for exams as a private student or could I simply study at home.. and do the exams privately anyway without having enrolled onto any kind of official course anywhere.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Jamie.B124)
Classroom situation not good for me and I work slower than the rest of the class, I'm 31 the rest of the group were 16 -18 and doing multiple A-Levels... I needed more than 10 minutes to answer 6 questions on topics I'd never seen before. Is it possible I can study at home - not join a college... and sit the exams at college just the exams only. Do I have to join an open-distance-learning for £295 per course and then contact the college for exams as a private student or could I simply study at home.. and do the exams privately anyway without having enrolled onto any kind of official course anywhere.
You can do the latter.

You would be a private candidate that means you sort out a private exam centre and pay them money for:
https://www.aqa.org.uk/student-and-p...ate-candidates

1. The exam fee for the exam board to set and mark the papers.
2. A centre fee for the centre to do the paperwork on your behalf and to provide you with a venue to sit the exam.

1 Is about £100 per A level. You need to book in advance otherwise these fees increase the closer to exams you are.
2. Can range from £150-300.
3. There is a significant. extra cost if you are doing science subjects.
4. there are extra costs if you are doing languages.


You say it takes you longer, which is fine if you arent used to studying then you should speed up after a bit. If ytou dont then you need to decide if you can cope with the material or its just it takes you longer. They are two different issues. If you cant cope with the material, then question whether you should be doing A levels.

Imo you are lucky to have found a place where they will take adults and teach A level. Most colleges no longer do A levels.

You can buy online courses if you want and learn at your own convenience, but you still have to pay the above fees in addition to the course which is just notes. You will be paying yourself.

The alternative is to buy the books and teach yourself, but you should be confident you have the ability to do this.
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DCDCo
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What are your plans after A-Levels? If you want to study a course that accepts alternatives to A-Levels, you could study an Access to HE course either at a college or via distance learning. The bonus is that the brick and mortar HE course may have older students in it (due to the nature of the course). Also, Access to HE is shorter than A-levels. Bonus!

Of course - If your plans are to go to University and study a course that strictly requires A-Levels... ignore the above! The advice from the previous poster is excellent and worth noting
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Jamie.B124
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It's more hobby-related. I felt that school didn't result in my true self, for example, GCSE English Language Foundation 2004 grade D. 2013 Adult Education GCSE English HIGHER grade A. 268/300. 180/180UMS for the final exam, 88/120 was the coursework, so my 32 points shortfall (I was 2 points away from an A*) came from my coursework. GCSE Foundation Maths grade D... 2013 Adult Education GCSE HIGHER Maths grade B. each course was 6 months once a week... I enjoy studying at home as a passtime/hobby instead of video games which I felt was time-wasting. I tried the A Level after those few years gap since the GCSE for 3 weeks but left. however because adult education only really wants people to get a C.. they mostly place everyone on Foundation - I had to do the Higher stuff myself and was the only student doing higher, so my high-B was all my own effort without a teacher. I have no idea in a job or anything, I did AAT level 2 & 3. Diagnosed Aspergers 2013. I've looked at the AQA website and even considered going down the list and could do every course, but it's sustaining it and staying committed.

(Original post by DCDCo)
What are your plans after A-Levels? If you want to study a course that accepts alternatives to A-Levels, you could study an Access to HE course either at a college or via distance learning. The bonus is that the brick and mortar HE course may have older students in it (due to the nature of the course). Also, Access to HE is shorter than A-levels. Bonus!

Of course - If your plans are to go to University and study a course that strictly requires A-Levels... ignore the above! The advice from the previous poster is excellent and worth noting
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ozzyoscy
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If it's just a hobby, save your money and just go to the library, borrow the textbooks and read them. It's the same, but free and no memory test at the end!

If you do want a grade by the end of it, I wouldn't recommend wasting money on A Level exams, especially if you're not fast enough. GCSEs are very easy in comparison, but you're probably going to run out of time in most of the A Level ones. If the grade boundaries are as bad as a few years ago, it's even worse. Though I did sciences and maths, maybe others are different.
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National Extension College
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Hi Jamie,
if the classroom isn't working out, then consider an NEC online course. It's reassuring to have a syllabus laid out so you know you have covered and tested yourself on everything before your exams. We can provide your A level study over one or two years, plus exam venues if needed. It's not the same for every A level, so why not call us and talk it through. 0800 3892839.
Daniel
(Original post by Jamie.B124)
Classroom situation not good for me and I work slower than the rest of the class, I'm 31 the rest of the group were 16 -18 and doing multiple A-Levels... I needed more than 10 minutes to answer 6 questions on topics I'd never seen before. Is it possible I can study at home - not join a college... and sit the exams at college just the exams only. Do I have to join an open-distance-learning for £295 per course and then contact the college for exams as a private student or could I simply study at home.. and do the exams privately anyway without having enrolled onto any kind of official course anywhere.
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