I don’t know how to use public transport at 18, can I still work? Watch

Anonymous #1
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Title.
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Anonymous #1
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Also not allowed to go anywhere unaccompanied or at least with public transport
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randomsheep11
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Does this whole not being allowed to go anywhere by yourself some sort of religious thing, or are your parents just overprotective?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by randomsheep11)
Does this whole not being allowed to go anywhere by yourself some sort of religious thing, or are your parents just overprotective?
Overprotective because I was sick all my life.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Overprotective because I was sick all my life.
Well, unless your parents (or whoever accompanies you) is happy to take you to and collect you from work, and you won't go by yourself, then I'm not sure how you can work realistically. Have your health problems resolved?

The best way to learn how to do something is to practise, whether that's alone or with someone else.
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Anonymous #2
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Don’t know how to use public transport? 😂 You pay for a ticket and get on the bus or train, not exactly rocket science. Oh and don’t forget to take a seat.

If it’s really that much of an issue why not just get a job at your local pub or shops?
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YaliaV
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What was the illness?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Don’t know how to use public transport? 😂 You pay for a ticket and get on the bus or train, not exactly rocket science. Oh and don’t forget to take a seat.

If it’s really that much of an issue why not just get a job at your local pub or shops?
Changing lines (eg from DLR to central line) is very hard for me and I always get lost.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by YaliaV)
What was the illness?
That’s irrelevant
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sknudson
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I mean the obvious solution here is to pick a job within walking distance of your home, but that's easier said than done. What about public transport has you confused?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by sknudson)
I mean the obvious solution here is to pick a job within walking distance of your home, but that's easier said than done. What about public transport has you confused?
Changing lines. Also my parents won’t let me use public transport on my own due to my height (4 ft 7, don’t ask why I am a midget I have something that causes primordial dwarfism).
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Anonymous #1
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If I choose a job within walking distance from my home I will most likely end up with a dead end job and not a decent job or a good job, and it doesn’t help with the fact that I have the bare minimum qualifications (GCSEs and an AS level) and had to end my education at 17 due to health issues.
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sknudson
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Changing lines. Also my parents won’t let me use public transport on my own due to my height (4 ft 7, don’t ask why I am a midget I have something that causes primordial dwarfism).
I imagine even the most seasoned Underground user still gets confused with changing lines and services. Whenever I'm in London, I always have to check the service map and direction. Every time. Failing that, you may find the overground buses a bit easier to use for short hops without a connection even if they're dreadfully slow (and have people ringing the damn stop bell 500 times per stop)
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liam.ro
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(Original post by Anonymous)
If I choose a job within walking distance from my home I will most likely end up with a dead end job and not a decent job or a good job, and it doesn’t help with the fact that I have the bare minimum qualifications (GCSEs and an AS level) and had to end my education at 17 due to health issues.
Using the bus seems like the best option for you. You'll have to learn how buses work, how to get on the right ones, how to pay, etc. – that's something unavoidable. It can most certainly be done, unless you happen to have some sort of learning disability.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by sknudson)
I imagine even the most seasoned Underground user still gets confused with changing lines and services. Whenever I'm in London, I always have to check the service map and direction. Every time. Failing that, you may find the overground buses a bit easier to use for short hops without a connection even if they're dreadfully slow (and have people ringing the damn stop bell 500 times per stop)
Yeah I do get confused with maps.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by liam.ro)
Using the bus seems like the best option for you. You'll have to learn how buses work, how to get on the right ones, how to pay, etc. – that's something unavoidable. It can most certainly be done, unless you happen to have some sort of learning disability.
I don’t have a learning disability I don’t think, I do very well academically and did very well at school, but when it comes to the outside world like using transport and rent and stuff I don’t know anything.
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sknudson
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah I do get confused with maps.
Anything in particular? The Underground maps are done according to direction on the line, so you'll see your intended destination on one or the other and it would be a matter of going on that side of the station to get on the train traveling in the right direction. You'll obviously have to be familiar with when to connect and onto what line (DLR to Central) but getting to the right point in the station is relatively straightforward with the overhead direction signs. Choosing the right direction is what I imagine throws most people off. Certainly does me without checking.
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Anonymous #3
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You are not alone mate. I'm 18 and physically able. But still i don't know how to use underground properly. Maybe because i hardly use underground due to my free bus transport.
(Original post by Anonymous)
I don’t have a learning disability I don’t think, I do very well academically and did very well at school, but when it comes to the outside world like using transport and rent and stuff I don’t know anything.
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liam.ro
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I don’t have a learning disability I don’t think, I do very well academically and did very well at school, but when it comes to the outside world like using transport and rent and stuff I don’t know anything.
If that's the case, then it should definitely be possible for you to use public transport, although you'd need to put in a fair amount of effort.

It's common for people with overprotective parents to have a poor understanding of the outside world, so there's no need to be particularly concerned. Start from researching how buses work, how to pay for a ride, how to signal that you'd like to get off, and similar basics. Once you understand the essential information needed to use a bus, get yourself accompanied outside in order to watch people interact with buses at bus stops and consolidate your knowledge.

The next step will be thinking about how to make the process of using a bus easier for you. For example, in order to minimise complications, it may be easier to buy an Oyster card instead of paying each time. It'll allow you to tap onto buses without the fuss of figuring out the money needed, as long as you have topped it up with enough money. Once this is done, you can finally research the specific buses you need in order to get where you need to be. Using some sort of acronym, or drawing a representative illustration that you understand can help you to remember the route you must take.

I know similar people who've managed to figure it out, so there's no need to be disheartened as it's definitely doable.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Changing lines (eg from DLR to central line) is very hard for me and I always get lost.
Follow the signs. They're made to be understrood by tourists who don't speak a word of English. The more you take the tube the more familiar you'll be.
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